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Altered health status and quality of life in South Asians with coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131706
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Kevin R Bainey
Colleen M Norris
Milan Gupta
Danielle Southern
Diane Galbraith
Merril L Knudtson
Michelle M Graham
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Am Heart J. 2011 Sep;162(3):501-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
People of South Asian (SA) ancestry are susceptible to coronary artery disease (CAD). Although studies suggest that SA with CAD has a worse prognosis compared with Europeans, it is unknown whether corresponding differences in functional status and quality-of-life (QOL) measures exist. Accordingly, we compared symptoms, function, and QOL in SA and European Canadians with CAD using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ).
Using the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease, an outcomes registry that captures patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Alberta, Canada, we identified 635 SA and 18,934 European patients with angiographic CAD from January 1995 to December 2006 who reported health status outcomes using the SAQ at 1 year after the index catheterization. To obtain comparable clinical variables among SA and Europeans, we used a propensity score-matching technique.
One-year adjusted mean (SD) scores were significantly lower in SA compared with European Canadians for most SAQ domains: exertional capacity (75 [23] vs 80 [23], P = .011), anginal stability (77 [28] vs 77 [27], P = .627), anginal frequency (86 [23] vs 88 [20], P
PubMed ID
21884867 View in PubMed
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Comparative analysis of clinical, electrocardiographic, angiographic and echocardiographic data of indigenous and non-indigenous residents of Yakutia with coronary artery atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107890
Source
Pages 314-320 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):314-320
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Natalya Vladimirovna Makharova
Michael Ivanovich Voevoda
Faina Fedorovna Lyutova
Irina Andreevna Pinigina
Vera Evstafievna Tarasova
Author Affiliation
Yakutsk Scientific Center, SB RAMS, Yakutsk, Russia. makharova@mail.ru
Source
Pages 314-320 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):314-320
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Age Factors
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - ethnology
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Female
Hematologic Tests
Humans
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Male
Obesity - ethnology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - ethnology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
The aim of the study is to compare clinical, angiographic, electrocardiographic, echocardiographic data between indigenous and non-indigenous residents of Yakutia.
We performed cross-sectional analysis of the Registry of Selective Coronary Angiography (SCAG) of the Yakutsk Republican Hospital for the period from 2004 to 2007. All patients (n = 1,233) were admitted to hospital from all 35 regions of the Sakha Republic (Yakutia). Initially, 12 (1%) patients, who had abnormal coronary arteries and 259 (21%) patients with normal coronary arteries were excluded from this study. From the remaining 962 (78%) patients with detected coronary artery atherosclerosis 394 (41%) patients were excluded for having congenital heart malformations due to possible influence on the outcomes of examination for myocardial hypertrophy. Finally, only 568 patients were selected for further examinations.
We analyzed clinical data, and the findings of selective angiography, multi-detector computed tomography (CT), electrocardiography (ECG), 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring and echocardiography.
(a) In the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) single-vessel coronary disease, coronary stenosis with 50-75% and 75-90% of constriction were detected more often among indigenous males, while multiple-vessel coronary stenosis was detected more often among non-indigenous males as well as stenosis with more than 90% of constriction. Lower calcium score mean (349.1 ± 129.8 vs. 621.8 ± 115.2) was observed among indigenous patients compared to non-indigenous patients; (b) Painless myocardial infarction, painless ischaemia, arterial hypertension and atrial fibrillation were detected more often among indigenous male compared to non-indigenous participants; (c) Based on the results of ECG and echocardiographic examinations, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, particular eccentric type of hypertrophy, was found more commonly among indigenous than non-indigenous males; and (d) By laboratory findings, indigenous males had significantly lower triglyceride levels, while platelet counts were higher compared to non-indigenous patients. Obesity was observed less frequently among indigenous men compared to non-indigenous men.
The differences observed in this study are disputable and call for further studies. Collection of reliable data for women should be the aim of future studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23967413 View in PubMed
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