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107 records – page 1 of 11.

[10-12 years' clinical results in 300 initial patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass at the Montreal Cardiology Institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242152
Source
Union Med Can. 1983 Mar;112(3):229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983

30-day mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery has greatly improved over the last decade, but the 1-year mortality remains constant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269410
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laura Sommer Hansen
Vibeke Elisabeth Hjortdal
Jan Jesper Andreasen
Poul Erik Mortensen
Carl-Johan Jakobsen
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Valves - surgery
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a valuable tool in control of the quality of cardiac surgery. However, the validity of the risk score for the individual patient may be questioned. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the continued fall in short-term mortality reflects an actual improvement in late mortality, and subsequently, to investigate EuroSCORE as predictor of 1-year mortality.
A population-based cohort study of 25,602 patients from a 12-year period from three public university hospitals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Analysis was carried out based on EuroSCORE, age and co-morbidity factors (residual EuroSCORE).
During the period the average age increased from 65.1 ± 10.0 years to 68.9 ± 10.7 years (P
Notes
Comment In: Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):143-425849680
PubMed ID
25849679 View in PubMed
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[A 20-year follow-up of Danish coronary artery bypass patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215805
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 13;157(7):889-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-13-1995
Author
C A Bertelsen
K. Høier-Madsen
K. Folke
P F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Thoraxkirurgisk afdeling R., Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 13;157(7):889-92
Date
Feb-13-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
This study describes the influence of complete revascularization on the long term survival of patients following coronary artery bypass surgery. The patient population consists of 100 consecutive patients discharged from our department after undergoing a coronary bypass operation between November 1973 and July 1978. Patients who survived less than 30 days postoperatively are excluded from the study. The patient population consists of 87 males and 13 females. Mean age was 52.2 years at time of surgery. The rate of revascularization was estimated by coronary angiography, performed between one and 34 months postoperatively, in contrast to other similar studies found in the literature, where such estimation was performed peroperatively. Twenty-five of 86 patients were completely revascularized at postoperative angiographic estimation. Long term survival for the patient population and for the group of completely revascularized patients were compared to the expected survival of the Danish background population (comparable age and sex). Long term survival for the patient population as a whole was similar to that found in similar studies. There was an expected increased mortality compared to the Danish background population.
PubMed ID
7701650 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent trends in postoperative mortality and preoperative comorbidity in isolated coronary artery bypass surgery: a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277099
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):391-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Kristinn Thorsteinsson
Kirsten Fonager
Charlotte Mérie
Gunnar Gislason
Lars Køber
Christian Torp-Pedersen
Rikke N Mortensen
Jan J Andreasen
Source
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):391-7
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - surgery
Denmark - epidemiology
Elective Surgical Procedures - mortality
Emergency Treatment - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
An increasing number of octogenarians are being subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The purpose of this study was to examine age-dependent trends in postoperative mortality and preoperative comorbidity over time following CABG.
All patients who underwent isolated CABG surgery between January 1996 and December 2012 in Denmark were included. Patients were identified through nationwide administrative registers. Age was categorized into five different groups and time into three periods to see if mortality and preoperative comorbidity had changed over time. Predictors of 30-day mortality were analysed in a multivariable Cox proportional-hazard models and survival at 1 and 5 years was estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves.
A total of 38 830 patients were included; the median age was 65.4 ± 9.5 years, increasing over time to 66.6 ± 9.5 years. Males comprised 80%. The number of octogenarians was 1488 (4%). The median survival was 14.7 years (60-69 years), 10.7 years (70-74 years), 8.9 years (75-79 years) and 7.2 years (=80 years). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%, increasing with age (1% in patients 80 years), respectively. The proportion of patients >75 years increased from 10 to 20% during the study period as well as the proportion of patients undergoing urgent or emergency surgery. The burden of comorbidities increased over time, e.g. congestive heart failure 13-17%, diabetes 12-21%, stroke 9-11%, in all age groups. Age and emergency surgery were the main predictors of 30-day mortality: age >80 years [hazard ratio (HR): 5.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.41-7.50], emergency surgery (HR: 5.23, 95% CI: 4.38-6.25).
Patients are getting older at the time of surgery and have a heavier burden of comorbidities than before. The proportion of patients undergoing urgent or emergency surgery increased with age and over time. Despite this, the 30-day mortality decreased over time and long-term survival increased, except in octogenarians where it was stable. Octogenarians had substantially higher 30-day mortality compared with younger patients but surgery can be performed with acceptable risks and good long-term outcomes.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2016 Feb;49(2):397-826242898
PubMed ID
25698155 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory surveillance of patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalization: a feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125434
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;28(4):497-501
Publication Type
Article
Author
David A Alter
Juda Habot
Sherry L Grace
Terry Fair
David Kiernan
Wendy Clark
David Fell
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. david.alter@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 Jul-Aug;28(4):497-501
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - mortality - rehabilitation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - mortality - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality - rehabilitation
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - mortality - rehabilitation
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Referral and Consultation
Survival Analysis
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Our purpose was to examine the feasibility of implementing an ambulatory surveillance system for monitoring patients referred to cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalizations.
This study consists of 1208 consecutive referrals to cardiac rehabilitation between October 2007 and April 2008. Patient attendance at cardiac rehabilitation, waiting times for cardiac rehabilitation, and adverse events while waiting for cardiac rehabilitation were tracked by telephone surveillance by a nurse.
Among the 1208 consecutive patients referred, only 44.7% attended cardiac rehabilitation; 36.4% of referred patients were known not to have attended any cardiac rehabilitation, while an additional 18.9% of referred patients were lost to follow-up. Among the 456 referred patients who attended the cardiac rehabilitation program, 19 (4.2%) experienced an adverse event while in the queue (13 of which were for cardiovascular hospitalizations with no deaths), with mean waiting times of 20 days and 24 days among those without and with adverse events, respectively. Among the 440 referred patients who were known not to have attended any cardiac rehabilitation program, 114 (25.9%) had adverse clinical events while in the queue; 46 of these events required cardiac hospitalization and 8 patients died.
Ambulatory surveillance for cardiac rehabilitation referrals is feasible. The high adverse event rates in the queue, particularly among patients who are referred but who do not attend cardiac rehabilitation programs, underscores the importance of ambulatory referral surveillance systems for cardiac rehabilitation following cardiac hospitalizations.
PubMed ID
22480901 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use before coronary artery bypass surgery is associated with long-term mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120881
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 10;167(6):2958-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2013
Author
Malin Stenman
Martin J Holzmann
Ulrik Sartipy
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 10;167(6):2958-62
Date
Sep-10-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality - trends
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Preoperative Period
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Depression is common in patients with coronary artery disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous reports on the relationship between antidepressant use before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and survival are conflicting. Our aim was to study the association between preoperative antidepressant use and survival following CABG.
We identified all patients who underwent primary isolated non-emergent CABG in Sweden between 2006 and 2008. We used the SWEDEHEART registry and the Swedish National Patient Register to acquire information about baseline characteristics, and the national Prescribed Drug Register to obtain data regarding exposure, defined as at least one antidepressant prescription dispensed before surgery.
Of the 10,884 patients identified, 1171 (11%) were treated with antidepressants before surgery. Unadjusted 4-year survival was 89% in the antidepressant group compared with 92% in the group without antidepressant use (p=0.002). After multivariable adjustment, antidepressant use was associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.77), compared with non-use of antidepressants. Antidepressant use was also associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization (HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.19-1.65) and the composite endpoint rehospitalization or death (HR 1.44; 95% CI 1.26-1.65).
Among patients who underwent contemporary primary isolated CABG on a nonemergency basis in Sweden, there was a strong and statistically significant association between antidepressant use prior to surgery and long-term survival.
PubMed ID
22959870 View in PubMed
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[Aortocoronary bypass surgery; 1970--77, at the thorax clinics, Karolinska Hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56003
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Nov 29;75(48):4479-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-29-1978
Author
S. Ekeström
Source
Lakartidningen. 1978 Nov 29;75(48):4479-81
Date
Nov-29-1978
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Evaluation Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
310007 View in PubMed
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Are even impaired fasting blood glucose levels preoperatively associated with increased mortality after CABG surgery?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47076
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Aug;26(15):1513-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
R E Anderson
K. Klerdal
T. Ivert
N. Hammar
G. Barr
A. Owall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Anaesthesiology, Karolinska University Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. russell.anderson@kirurgi.ki.se
Source
Eur Heart J. 2005 Aug;26(15):1513-8
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality
Fasting - blood
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - surgery
Preoperative Care
ROC Curve
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with macrovascular pathology and increased mortality after percutaneous coronary interventions. The study goal was to determine whether pre-operative fasting blood glucose (fB-glu) is associated with an increased mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). METHODS AND RESULTS: During 2001-03, 1895 patients underwent primary CABG [clinical DM (CDM) in 440/1895; complete data on fB-glu for n=1375/1455]. Using pre-operative fB-glu, non-diabetics were categorized as having normal fB-glu ( or =6.1 mmol/L). fB-glu was normal in 59%. The relative risks of 30 day and 1 year mortality compared with patients with normal fB-glu was 1.7 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-5.5] and 2.9 (CI: 0.8-11.2) with IFG, 2.8 (CI: 1.1-7.2) and 1.9 (CI: 0.5-6.3) with SDM vs. 1.8 (CI: 0.8-4.0) and 1.6 (CI: 0.6-4.3) if CDM, respectively. The receiver operator characteristic area for the continuous variable fB-glu and 1 year mortality was 0.65 (P=0.002). CONCLUSION: The elevated risk of death after CABG surgery known previously to be associated with CDM seems also to be shared by a group of similar size that includes patients with IFG and undiagnosed DM.
PubMed ID
15800018 View in PubMed
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Assessing the outcomes of coronary artery bypass graft surgery: how many risk factors are enough? Steering Committee of the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207414
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 1;30(5):1317-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1997
Author
J V Tu
K. Sykora
C D Naylor
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences in Ontario, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, North York, Canada. tu@ices.on.ca
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 1;30(5):1317-23
Date
Nov-1-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
We sought to determine whether more comprehensive risk-adjustment models have a significant impact on hospital risk-adjusted mortality rates after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) in Ontario, Canada.
The Working Group Panel on the Collaborative CABG Database Project has categorized 44 clinical variables into 7 core, 13 level 1 and 24 level 2 variables, to reflect their relative importance in determining short-term mortality after CABG.
Using clinical data for all 5,517 patients undergoing isolated CABG in Ontario in 1993, we developed 12 increasingly comprehensive risk-adjustment models using logistic regression analysis of 6 of the Panel's core variables and 6 of the Panel's level 1 variables. We studied how the risk-adjusted mortality rates of the nine cardiac surgery hospitals in Ontario changed as more variables were included in these models.
Incorporating six of the core variables in a risk-adjustment model led to a model with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77. The ROC curve area slightly improved to 0.79 with the inclusion of six additional level 1 variables (p = 0.063). Hospital risk-adjusted mortality rates and relative rankings stabilized after adjusting for six core variables. Adding an additional six level 1 variables to a risk-adjustment model had minimal impact on overall results.
A small number of core variables appear to be sufficient for fairly comparing risk-adjusted mortality rates after CABG across hospitals in Ontario. For efficient interprovider comparisons, risk-adjustment models for CABG could be simplified so that only essential variables are included in these models.
PubMed ID
9350934 View in PubMed
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Associations of metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus with 16-year survival after CABG.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105203
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2014;13:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ville Hällberg
Ari Palomäki
Jorma Lahtela
Seppo Voutilainen
Matti Tarkka
Matti Kataja
Author Affiliation
Kanta-Häme Central Hospital, Hämeenlinna, Finland. ville.hallberg@khshp.fi.
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2014;13:25
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - mortality - surgery
Middle Aged
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The associations of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or diabetes mellitus (DM) on long-term survival after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) have not been extensively evaluated. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of MetS and DM on the 16-year survival after CABG.
Diabetic and metabolic status together with relevant cardiovascular data was established in 910 CABG patients operated in 1993-94. They were divided in three groups as follows: neither DM nor MetS (375 patients), MetS alone (279 patients) and DM with or without MetS (256 patients). The 16-year follow-up of patient survival was carried out using national health databases. The relative survival rates were analyzed using the Life Table method comparing the observed survival rates of three patient groups to the rates based on age-, sex- and time-specific life tables for the whole population in Finland. To study the independent significance of MetS and DM for clinical outcome, multivariate analysis was made using an optimizing stepwise procedure based on the Bayesian approach.
Bayesian multivariate analysis revealed together six variables to predict clinical outcome (2 months to 16 years) in relation to the national background population, i.e. age, diabetes, left ventricular ejection fraction, BMI, perfusion time during the CABG and peripheral arterial disease. Our principal finding was that after postoperative period the 16-year prognosis of patients with neither DM nor MetS was better than that of the age-, sex-and time-matched background population (relative survival against background population 1.037, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24447406 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.