Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

Angiography and revascularization in patients with heart failure following fibrinolytic therapy for ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176663
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 15;95(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2005
Author
Amir Kashani
C Michael Gibson
Sabina A Murphy
Marc S Sabatine
David A Morrow
Elliott M Antman
Robert P Giugliano
Author Affiliation
Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 15;95(2):228-33
Date
Jan-15-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology - mortality - surgery
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - drug therapy
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Plasminogen Activators - administration & dosage
Survival Analysis
Thrombolytic Therapy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
We evaluated the use of coronary angiography and clinical outcomes among patients who had heart failure and were enrolled in the Intravenous Novel Plasminogen Activator (NPA) for the Treatment of Infarcting Myocardium Early study, a large international trial of fibrinolytic therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
15642555 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appropriateness of coronary angiography after myocardial infarction among Medicare beneficiaries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195462
Source
N Engl J Med. 2001 Mar 8;344(10):774-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-2001

Are we using cardiovascular medications and coronary angiography appropriately in men and women with chest pain?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137094
Source
Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1331-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Nina Johnston
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Bo Lagerqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, Uppsala University Hospital 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. nina.johnston@akademiska.se
Source
Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1331-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Angina, Stable - etiology - mortality - radiography
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Stenosis - drug therapy - mortality - radiography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Prognosis
Retreatment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
The main purpose of the present study was to analyse the contemporary use of cardiovascular medications and diagnostic coronary angiography in men and women with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Furthermore, we examined the association of outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, repeat coronary angiography, procedural complications) with angiographic findings.
All patients with stable chest pain (n = 12 200) referred for a first-time elective diagnostic coronary angiography during 2006-08 and registered in the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Register (SCAAR) were included. Significant CAD was defined as = 50% luminal narrowing in any epicardial coronary artery.
In the youngest age group (= 59 years), more women than men (78.8 vs. 42.3%, P
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1313-521393339
PubMed ID
21317147 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of changes in health-related quality of life in coronary heart disease with coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53266
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Oct 4;2:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-2004
Author
Marijke Veenstra
Kjell I Pettersen
Arnfinn Rollag
Knut Stavem
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Health Services Research Centre, P.O. Box 7004, St Olavs plass 0130, Oslo, Norway. marijke.veenstra@nhsrc.no
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2004 Oct 4;2:56
Date
Oct-4-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - utilization
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Disease - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Catheterization - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have focused on the association between the sociodemographic characteristics of a patient with the change in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) following invasive coronary procedures, and the results remain inconclusive. The objective of the present study was to measure the temporal changes in HRQOL of patients with coronary heart disease, and assess how these changes are associated with invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics. METHODS: This was a prospective study of 254 patients with angina pectoris and 90 patients with acute coronary syndrome. HRQOL was assessed with the multi-item scales and summary components of the SF-36, both 6 weeks and 2 years after baseline hospitalization in 1998. Paired t-tests and multiple regression analyses were used to assess temporal changes in HRQOL and to identify the associated factors. RESULTS: Physical components of HRQOL had improved most during the 2 years following invasive coronary procedures. Our findings indicated that patients with angina pectoris who were younger, male, and more educated were most likely to increase their HRQOL following invasive coronary procedures. When adjusting for baseline HRQOL scores, invasive coronary procedures and sociodemographic characteristics did not explain temporal changes in patients with acute coronary syndrome, possibly due to higher comorbidity. CONCLUSION: Sociodemographic characteristics should be taken into account when comparing and interpreting changes in HRQOL scores in patients with and without invasive coronary procedures.
PubMed ID
15461816 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of management patterns after acute myocardial infarction in Canada and the United States. The SAVE investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221438
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Mar 18;328(11):779-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-18-1993
Author
J L Rouleau
L A Moyé
M A Pfeffer
J M Arnold
V. Bernstein
T E Cuddy
G R Dagenais
E M Geltman
S. Goldman
D. Gordon
Author Affiliation
Université de Sherbrooke, Que., Canada.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1993 Mar 18;328(11):779-84
Date
Mar-18-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology
Canada
Captopril - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Care Units - utilization
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Myocardial Revascularization - utilization
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care
Random Allocation
Recurrence
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
There are major differences in the organization of the health care systems in Canada and the United States. We hypothesized that these differences may be accompanied by differences in patient care.
To test our hypothesis, we compared the treatment patterns for patients with acute myocardial infarction in 19 Canadian and 93 United States hospitals participating in the Survival and Ventricular Enlargement (SAVE) study, which tested the effectiveness of captopril in this population of patients after a myocardial infarction.
In Canada, 51 percent of the patients admitted to a participating coronary care unit had acute myocardial infarctions, as compared with only 35 percent in the United States (P
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1993 Mar 18;328(11):805-78437602
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1993 Sep 23;329(13):964; author reply 965-68361514
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1993 Sep 23;329(13):964-5; author reply 965-68123103
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 1993 Sep 23;329(13):965; author reply 965-68361516
PubMed ID
8123063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of treatment and outcomes for patients with acute myocardial infarction in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, and Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49707
Source
Am Heart J. 2003 Dec;146(6):1023-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Johan Herlitz
Paul McGovern
Mikael Dellborg
Thomas Karlsson
Susan Duval
Björn W Karlson
Seungmin Lee
Russell V Luepker
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Am Heart J. 2003 Dec;146(6):1023-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - utilization
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Echocardiography - utilization
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Minnesota - epidemiology
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is changing, and differences in medical practice are observed within and between countries on the basis of local practice patterns and available technology. These differing approaches provide an opportunity to evaluate medical practice and outcomes at the population level. The primary aim of this study was to compare medical care in patients hospitalized with AMI in 2 large cities in Sweden and the United States. A secondary aim was to compare medical outcomes. METHODS: All resident patients (age range, 30-74 years) hospitalized with AMI in Göteborg, Sweden (1995-1996), and a representative population-based sample of all patients with AMI in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn (1995). RESULTS: Patients with AMI in Göteborg (GB) were older than patients in Minneapolis/St. Paul (MSP), but fewer patients in GB had a prior history of cardiovascular disease. During the AMI admission, coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PTCA), and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were performed twice as frequently in MSP than in GB. Echocardiogram and exercise testing were more frequently performed in GB. During hospitalization, beta-blockers were more frequently prescribed in GB, whereas calcium channel blockers, long- and short-acting nitrates, intravenous nitroglycerine, digitalis, aspirin, oral anticoagulants, heparin, and lidocaine were significantly more common in MSP. Thrombolysis, acute PTCA, ACE inhibitors, and diuretics were similar. Reinfarction was higher in men in GB (4% vs 1%, P
PubMed ID
14660994 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary angiography and bypass surgery in Manitoba and the United States: a first comparison.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219258
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1994 Jan-Feb;10(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
L L Roos
R. Bond
C D Naylor
M R Chassin
A L Morris
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Department of Community Health Sciences, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1994 Jan-Feb;10(1):49-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Artery Bypass - utilization
Coronary Disease - pathology - radiography - surgery
Humans
Manitoba
Middle Aged
United States
Abstract
To compare the appropriateness of use of coronary angiography (CA) and bypass surgery (CABS) in the early 1980s in one Canadian hospital and several American hospitals using explicit case-based criteria. Procedure rates were much lower in Canada during this period.
Canadian subjects, 502 Manitoba residents undergoing CA at one hospital in 1981-82 were tracked forward to determine whether and when they underwent CABS. CA comparisons were made with 351 Canadian patients aged 55 years or older; 1677 American CA patients aged 65 years or older and were drawn in 1981 from three hospitals. Two hundred and forty-five patients undergoing CABS within 12 months of CA made up the Canadian sample. American CABS patients were sampled from three hospitals during 1979-82. Manitoba patients assigned to medical treatment after CA were also appraised.
Criteria were derived by an American panel of clinicians following a Delphi process; indications were rated appropriate, equivocal and inappropriate. A trained abstractor reviewed charts and assigned ratings. Results of exercise electrocardiograms were not available in the Manitoba data set, hence sensitivity analyses were performed to determine how differing proportions of positive exercise electrocardiograms might affect the Manitoba results.
Even assuming only 50% of treadmill tests were positive in the Manitoba sample, the proportion of inappropriate CA was lower in Manitoba than for the American hospitals: 9% versus 15 to 18%. For CABS, only one of the three comparison American hospitals approached the Manitoba hospital level of appropriateness.
In the early 1980s, there was more appropriate use of CA and CABS in a Manitoba hospital compared with several American hospitals. Many Canadian patients undergoing CA and treated medically met American indications for appropriate use of CABS. Whether this represents underprovision of necessary care remains uncertain.
PubMed ID
8111671 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coronary angiography following acute myocardial infarction in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163991
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Apr 23;167(8):808-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-23-2007
Author
Sheldon M Singh
Peter C Austin
Alice Chong
David A Alter
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 2007 Apr 23;167(8):808-13
Date
Apr-23-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - radiography
Ontario
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Abstract
The role of scientific evidence in shaping recommendations on capacity targets and cardiovascular technology utilization is unclear.
The temporal growth in the use of coronary angiography services and the use of statins after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was determined for all patients older than 65 years admitted to any hospital in Ontario, Canada, between 1992 and 2004. A Bayesian change-point regression model was used to determine the rate of maximum uptake (inflection point) for use of cardiac catheterization service and statins after AMI. The inflection points were compared with the corresponding publication dates of the first positive evidence for outcome efficacy of use of cardiac catheterization service and statins after AMI as obtained from randomized control trials.
The use of post-AMI coronary angiography closely mirrored overall temporal increases in cardiac catheterization capacity between 1992 and 2004 (r = 0.95, P
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Oct 22;167(19):2146-717954816
PubMed ID
17452544 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.