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30 records – page 1 of 3.

A 5-y follow-up of the radiation exposure to in-room personnel during cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224582
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Montreal Heart Institute, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Personnel, Hospital
Quebec
Radiation Dosage
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Abstract
This study documents the radiation doses received by all in-room personnel of three cardiac catheterization laboratories where more than 15,000 cardiac procedures have been performed over a 5-y period. It is shown that all in-room personnel was exposed to a body dose equivalent well below any regulatory limits. However, some workers may have exceeded the occupational 150 mSv y-1 recommended limit for the lens of the eye. The physicians-in-training and the staff physicians are the two groups more likely to reach this limit. It is also demonstrated that a low correlation exists between the annual number of procedures and the annual head dose equivalent of a physician, but more variation is likely to originate from his/her working attitude and techniques. The mean dose equivalent at the collar level of the physicians is estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 mSv per procedure.
PubMed ID
1727405 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 20;157(8):1033-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1995
Author
O. Davidsen
C. Sjøstrøm
L. Thuesen
Author Affiliation
Hjertemedicinsk afdeling, Skejby Sygehus Arhus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Feb 20;157(8):1033-5
Date
Feb-20-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Safety
Abstract
Based upon hospital files and a questionnaire we assessed the patient safety of and the patient attitude towards outpatient coronary angiography (CAG). A total of 115 consecutive patients were included in the study. Thirty two of the patients (28%) were admitted following the angiography, while 83 (72%) were discharged to the home as planned. Of those de facto ambulatory patients one (1%) was readmitted because of a groin haematoma. Of those who returned the questionnaire, 93% of the patients admitted and 97% of the de facto ambulatory patients were satisfied with the level of information, and 76% and 99%, respectively, would prefer out-patient CAG to CAG during admission. We conclude that out-patient CAG can be performed with a very low risk and is well accepted by the patients.
PubMed ID
7879302 View in PubMed
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Associations between acute kidney injury and cardiovascular and renal outcomes after coronary angiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137831
Source
Circulation. 2011 Feb 1;123(4):409-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2011
Author
Matthew T James
William A Ghali
Merril L Knudtson
Pietro Ravani
Marcello Tonelli
Peter Faris
Neesh Pannu
Braden J Manns
Scott W Klarenbach
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. mjames@ucalgary.ca
Source
Circulation. 2011 Feb 1;123(4):409-16
Date
Feb-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Kidney Injury - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Creatinine - blood
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with early mortality after percutaneous coronary revascularization procedures, but its prognostic relevance to long-term clinical outcomes remains controversial.
We conducted a retrospective study of 14782 adults who received coronary angiography in the province of Alberta, Canada, between 2004 and 2006. AKI was identified on the basis of changes in serum creatinine concentration within 7 days of the procedure according to AKI Network criteria. The associations between AKI and long-term outcomes, including mortality, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular and renal hospitalizations, were studied with the use of Cox regression of multiple failure times. The adjusted risk of death increased with increasing severity of AKI; compared with no AKI, the adjusted hazard ratio for death was 2.00 (95% confidence interval, 1.69 to 2.36) with stage 1 AKI and 3.72 (95% confidence interval, 2.92 to 4.76) with stage 2 or 3 AKI. The adjusted risk of end-stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy also increased according to the severity of AKI (hazard ratio, 4.15 [95% confidence interval, 2.32 to 7.42] and 11.74 [95% confidence interval, 6.38 to 21.59], respectively), as did the risks of subsequent hospitalizations for heart failure and acute renal failure.
These findings inform the controversy surrounding AKI after angiography, demonstrating that it is a significant risk factor for long-term mortality, end-stage renal disease, and hospitalization for cardiovascular and renal events after coronary angiography.
PubMed ID
21242477 View in PubMed
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Clinical and procedural characteristics associated with higher radiation exposure during percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary angiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107059
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Oct 1;6(5):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2013
Author
Ronak Delewi
Loes P Hoebers
Truls Råmunddal
José P S Henriques
Oskar Angerås
Jason Stewart
Lotta Robertsson
Magnus Wahlin
Petur Petursson
Jan J Piek
Per Albertsson
Göran Matejka
Elmir Omerovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Interv. 2013 Oct 1;6(5):501-6
Date
Oct-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Artery Bypass
Coronary Occlusion
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Radial Artery - surgery
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Radiometry
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
We aim to study the clinical and procedural characteristics associated with higher radiation exposure in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) and coronary angiography.
Our present study included all coronary angiography and PCI procedures in 5 PCI centers in the Western part of Sweden, between January 1, 2008, and January 19, 2012. The radiation exposure and clinical data were collected prospectively in these 5 PCI centers in Sweden as part of the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR). A prediction model was made for the radiation exposure (dose-area product) expressed in Gy·cm(2). A total of 20?669 procedures were included in the present study, consisting of 9850 PCI and 10?819 coronary angiography procedures. In multivariable analyses, body mass index (ß=1.04; confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.04; P
PubMed ID
24065442 View in PubMed
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[Complications of coronary vessel radiography--a Swedish study compared with international results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224517
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jan 8;89(1-2):30-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-1992
Author
S G Fransson
Author Affiliation
Röntgenavdelningen, thoraxsektionen, universitetssjukhuset, Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jan 8;89(1-2):30-2
Date
Jan-8-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
1734129 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Coronary angiography in a county hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54013
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5889-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2000
Author
J F Prytz
E W Nielsen
E. Hall
R. Røde
Author Affiliation
Nordland Sentralsykehus, radiologisk avdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Oct 30;162(44):5889-94
Date
Oct-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Clinical Competence
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - mortality - standards - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - radiography
English Abstract
Fatal Outcome
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - radiography
Hospitals, County - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: At a county hospital in northern Norway, coronary angiographies have been performed for more than 25 years. We wanted to compare our complication rates with results from larger hospitals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data concerning indication for angiography, findings and complications were collected retrospectively from the files of 837 patients who underwent coronary angiography at our hospital during the last ten years. The number of procedures per year has varied from 30 to 125. RESULTS: 50% of the patients had three-vessel and/or left main coronary artery stenosis. Less than 10% of the patients had no significant coronary stenosis or valvular disease at angiography. The total complication rate was 4.8%. Nine patients (1.1%) had myocardial infarction or stroke with sequelae; three patients died (0.4%). INTERPRETATION: Our complication rates are higher than those from other larger hospitals in Norway and internationally, but they have decreased over time. The high percentage of serious coronary pathology among our patients may have contributed significantly to the complication rate. In addition, the annual number of exams may have been too low to give sufficient operator training. The results require a continuing evaluation of our practice.
PubMed ID
11094546 View in PubMed
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[Coronary angiography in a county hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54017
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Sep 10;120(21):2507-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2000
Author
J F Prytz
E W Nielsen
E. Hall
R. Røde
Author Affiliation
Radiologisk avdeling, Nordland Sentralsykehus, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Sep 10;120(21):2507-11
Date
Sep-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Clinical Competence
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - mortality - standards - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - radiography
English Abstract
Fatal Outcome
Female
Heart Valve Diseases - radiography
Hospitals, County - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: At a county hospital in northern Norway, coronary angiographies have been performed for more than 25 years. We wanted to compare our complication rates with results from larger hospitals. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data concerning indication for angiography, findings and complications were collected retrospectively from the files of 837 patients who underwent coronary angiography at our hospital during the last ten years. The number of procedures per year has varied from 30 to 125. RESULTS: 50% of the patients had three-vessel and/or left main coronary artery stenosis. Less than 10% of the patients had no significant coronary stenosis or valvular disease at angiography. The total complication rate was 4.8%. Nine patients (1.1%) had myocardial infarction or stroke with sequelae; three patients died (0.4%). INTERPRETATION: Our complication rates are higher than those from other larger hospitals in Norway and internationally, but they have decreased over time. The high percentage of serious coronary pathology among our patients may have contributed significantly to the complication rate. In addition, the annual number of exams may have been too low to give sufficient operator training. The results require a continuing evaluation of our practice.
PubMed ID
11070986 View in PubMed
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[Coronary angiography in octogenarians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53524
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Jun 12;123(12):1668-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-2003
Author
Anders Hovland
Kari Jønland
Rune Wiseth
Author Affiliation
Medisinski avdeling Nordlandsskehuset, Bodø. anders.hovland@nordlandssykehuset.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Jun 12;123(12):1668-70
Date
Jun-12-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve Stenosis - radiography
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - radiography
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prevalence of heart disease increases with age, and the consequences of a more aggressive approach to heart disease among the elderly should be elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a retrospective study we examined the records of 277 patients above 80 years of age who have undergone coronary angiography at our institution. The records were systematically screened for all relevant information regarding complications and clinical consequences of the procedure. RESULTS: 97 % of the catheterisations were done because of coronary artery disease or aortic stenosis. Mortality following coronary angiography was 0.4 %. Severe complications were recorded in 3.6 %, minor complications in 1.8 %, which gives a total complication rate of 5.4 % in this group. 65 % of the patients were referred to invasive treatment (PCI, CABG, aortic valve replacements or combined procedures). INTERPRETATION: Coronary angiography can be done safely in patients above the age of 80. Also in this age group patients are often offered invasive treatment following coronary angiography.
PubMed ID
12821985 View in PubMed
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Coronary angiography of patients with a previous coronary artery by-pass operation is associated with a three times increased risk for neurological complications. A report from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151771
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2009 Dec;43(6):374-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tage Nilsson
Bo Lagerqvist
Per Tornvall
Author Affiliation
PCI unit, Central Hospital, 65185, Karlstad, Sweden. tagenilsson@svenskpci.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2009 Dec;43(6):374-9
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Coronary Artery Bypass
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the incidence of complications of diagnostic coronary angiography that was not followed by percutaneous coronary interventions and to compare differences in complication rates between patients with or without previous coronary artery by-pass surgery.
We evaluated major complications due to diagnostic coronary angiography by merging the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR), the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry and the National Population Registry.
A total of 1 115 complications were recorded (2.2%). There was a higher incidence of any complications in patients with a previous coronary by-pass surgery in uni-variable analysis (2.7% vs. 2.1%, p=0.003) but not in multi-variable analysis after adjustment for differences in background and procedural factors. Neurological complications were not common (0.20%) but after adjustment for differences in background and procedural factors, the risk of neurological complications was nearly three times higher in patients with a previous CABG compared to patients without previous CABG, odds ratio 2.89 (95% CI 1.68-4.97).
Neurological complications are significantly more common in patients with previous by-pass surgery. Considering the risk for neurological complications the risk-benefit ratio may be higher when compared with patients without previous by-pass surgery.
PubMed ID
19333818 View in PubMed
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Correlation between point-of-care platelet function testing and bleeding after coronary angiography according to two different definitions for bleeding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258727
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2014 Nov 1;114(9):1347-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2014
Author
Manne Holm
Per Tornvall
Magnus Dalén
Jan van der Linden
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2014 Nov 1;114(9):1347-53
Date
Nov-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - blood - drug therapy - radiography
Aged
Blood Platelets - physiology
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemorrhage - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Platelet Activation
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Platelet Function Tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Platelet function testing could be useful when assessing the risk for bleeding during treatment with antiplatelet drugs. This has been indicated in several studies, including the Antiplatelet Therapy for Reduction of Myocardial Damage During Angioplasty-Bleeding (ARMYDA-BLEEDS) study, which demonstrated that testing with a point-of-care assay correlated with bleeding events after percutaneous coronary intervention. To standardize bleeding definitions, the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) published a consensus report, which is in need of data-driven validation. Hence, the investigators conducted an observational, prospective, single-center study of 474 patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin who underwent coronary angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention from October 2006 to May 2011. Platelet reactivity was measured with adenosine diphosphate-induced single-platelet function testing (Plateletworks) at the start of coronary angiography. The primary end point was the 30-day incidence of bleeding as defined by BARC and ARMYDA-BLEEDS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between on-treatment platelet reactivity and the 30-day incidence of bleeding complications according to the BARC and ARMYDA-BLEEDS definitions. Patients in the first platelet aggregation quartile had a higher frequency of type 2 or higher BARC bleeding and ARMYDA-BLEEDS-defined bleeding
PubMed ID
25220849 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.