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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and coronary atherosclerosis progression--the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9388
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Imre Janszky
Kenneth J Mukamal
Kristina Orth-Gomér
Anders Romelsjö
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Bertil Svane
Richard L Kirkeeide
Murray A Mittleman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Thoracic Division, Box 220, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2004 Oct;176(2):311-9
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Angina Pectoris
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of alcohol intake with progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Although moderate drinkers have a lower risk of coronary heart disease than abstainers, the relation of alcohol use and coronary atherosclerosis has not been well studied. METHODS AND RESULTS: In the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Angiographic Study, we evaluated 103 women, aged 65 years or younger, hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris who underwent serial quantitative coronary angiography 3-6 months following their index event and repeated an average of 3 years and 3 months (range 2-5 years) later. Individual alcoholic beverage consumption was assessed by a standardized questionnaire. We used mixed model analysis to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as measured by mean luminal diameter change, controlling for age, smoking, body-mass index, education, physical activity, index cardiac event, menopausal status, diabetes, and history of dyslipidemia. Of the 93 women with complete information on alcohol intake, 14 consumed no alcohol (abstainers), 55 consumed up to 5 g of alcohol per day (light drinkers), and 24 consumed more than 5 g of alcohol per day (moderate drinkers). Coronary atherosclerosis progressed by a multivariate-adjusted average of 0.138 mm (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.027-0.249) among abstainers, 0.137 mm (95% CI: 0.057-0.217) among light drinkers, and -0.054 mm (95% CI: -0.154 to 0.047) among moderate drinkers (P
PubMed ID
15380454 View in PubMed
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Angiographic findings and survival in patients undergoing coronary angiography due to sudden cardiac arrest in western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269292
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 May;90:13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Björn Redfors
Truls Råmunddal
Oskar Angerås
Christian Dworeck
Inger Haraldsson
Dan Ioanes
P. Petursson
Berglind Libungan
Jacob Odenstedt
Jason Stewart
Lotta Robertsson
Magnus Wahlin
Per Albertsson
Johan Herlitz
Elmir Omerovic
Source
Resuscitation. 2015 May;90:13-20
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - mortality - radiography - therapy
Aged
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Occlusion - mortality - radiography - therapy
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Propensity Score
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) accounts for more than half of all deaths from coronary heart disease. Time to return of spontaneous circulation is the most important determinant of outcome but successful resuscitation also requires percutaneous coronary intervention in selected patients. However, proper selection of patients is difficult. We describe data on angiographic finding and survival from a prospectively followed SCA patient cohort.
We merged the RIKS-HIA registry (Register of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive Care Admissions) and SCAAR (Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry) for patients hospitalized in cardiac care units in Western Sweden between January 2005 and March 2013. We performed propensity score-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses on complete-case data as well as on imputed data sets.
638 consecutive patients underwent coronary angiography due to SCA. Severity of coronary artery disease was similar among SCA patients and patients undergoing coronary angiography due to suspected coronary artery disease (n=37,142). An acute occlusion was reported in the majority of SCA patients and was present in 37% of patients who did not have ST-elevation on the post resuscitation ECG. 31% of SCA patients died within 30 days. Long-term risk of death among patients who survived the first 30 days was higher in patients with SCA compared to patients with acute coronary syndromes (P
PubMed ID
25698668 View in PubMed
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An independent association between obstructive sleep apnoea and coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47941
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Jul;14(1):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
Y. Peker
H. Kraiczi
J. Hedner
S. Löth
A. Johansson
M. Bende
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1999 Jul;14(1):179-84
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis
Electrocardiography
Exercise Test
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - diagnosis
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies of sleep and breathing suggest an independent association between coronary artery disease (CAD) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in middle-aged males and females. These studies, however, were criticized because they did not properly adjust for all important confounding factors. In order to better control for the impact of these confounders, a case-control study was performed, matching for age, sex and body mass index (BMI), and additionally adjusting for hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus and current smoking. A consecutive selection of 62 patients (44 males and 18 females, mean age 69 yrs, range 44-88 yrs) requiring intensive care for angina pectoris or myocardial infarction at the County Hospital of Skaraborg, Skövde, Sweden, as well as 62 age-, sex- and BMI- matched control subjects without history or signs of heart disease underwent an overnight sleep/ventilatory monitoring study. The time interval between discharge from the intensive care unit and the overnight study ranged between 4 and 21 months. OSA, defined as a Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) of > or =10 x h(-1), was present in 19 CAD patients but only in eight control subjects (p=0.017). Using a univariate logistic regression analysis, current smoking (odds ratio (OR) 8.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-29.0), diabetes mellitus (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1-16.1) and OSA (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.2-7.5), but not hypertension (OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.2) and hypercholesterolaemia (OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.7-4.1) were significantly correlated with CAD. In a multiple logistic regression model, current smoking (OR 9.8, 95% CI 2.6-36.5), diabetes mellitus (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1-17.1) and OSA (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2-8.3) all remained independently associated with CAD. In summary, these data suggest a high occurrence of obstructive sleep apnoea in middle-aged and elderly patients with coronary artery disease requiring intensive care, which should be taken into account when considering risk factors for coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
10489848 View in PubMed
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Are we using cardiovascular medications and coronary angiography appropriately in men and women with chest pain?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137094
Source
Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1331-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Nina Johnston
Karin Schenck-Gustafsson
Bo Lagerqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Center, Uppsala University Hospital 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. nina.johnston@akademiska.se
Source
Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1331-6
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Angina, Stable - etiology - mortality - radiography
Cardiovascular Agents - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography - utilization
Coronary Stenosis - drug therapy - mortality - radiography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Prognosis
Retreatment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Unnecessary Procedures
Abstract
The main purpose of the present study was to analyse the contemporary use of cardiovascular medications and diagnostic coronary angiography in men and women with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Furthermore, we examined the association of outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, repeat coronary angiography, procedural complications) with angiographic findings.
All patients with stable chest pain (n = 12 200) referred for a first-time elective diagnostic coronary angiography during 2006-08 and registered in the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Register (SCAAR) were included. Significant CAD was defined as = 50% luminal narrowing in any epicardial coronary artery.
In the youngest age group (= 59 years), more women than men (78.8 vs. 42.3%, P
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2011 Jun;32(11):1313-521393339
PubMed ID
21317147 View in PubMed
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Aspirin (75 mg/day) after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease: long-term effects on the risk for myocardial infarction, occurrence of severe angina and the need for revascularization. Research Group on Instability in Coronary Artery Disease in Southeast Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55199
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1587-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1991
Author
L C Wallentin
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1587-93
Date
Dec-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Angina, Unstable - drug therapy - epidemiology - radiography
Aspirin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Life tables
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Myocardial Revascularization - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
In this study, 796 men with unstable coronary artery disease (that is, unstable angina or non-Q wave myocardial infarction) were randomized to double-blind placebo-controlled treatment with aspirin (75 mg/day). The long-term efficacy was judged from the occurrence of myocardial infarction or death or severe angina necessitating referral to coronary angiography. The risk of myocardial infarction or death was reduced during aspirin treatment--after 1 year, the risk ratio was 0.52 (confidence interval 0.37 to 0.72). Severe angina necessitating referral to coronary angiography was less common during aspirin therapy--after 3 months, the risk ratio was 0.59 (0.42 to 0.84) and after 1 year 0.71 (0.56 to 0.91). The combined event rate of myocardial infarction or death or referral to coronary angiography was reduced; after 3 months, the risk ratio was 0.44 (0.30 to 0.66) and after 1 year 0.65 (0.54 to 0.79). The 75-mg aspirin dose was well tolerated and had a high level of patient compliance. Treatment with aspirin (75 mg/day) should be recommended to all men for greater than or equal to 3 months after an episode of unstable coronary artery disease. Long-term therapy should be considered if there are no contraindications or side effects.
Notes
Comment On: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1991 Dec;18(7):1617-261960305
PubMed ID
1960301 View in PubMed
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Association between high levels of growth factors in plasma and progression of coronary atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55077
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 Nov;232(5):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
J. Nilsson
S. Volk-Jovinge
J. Svensson
C. Landou
U. De Faire
A. Hamsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 Nov;232(5):397-404
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Growth Substances - blood
Humans
Linear Models
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Platelet Factor 4 - analysis
Platelet-Derived Growth Factor - analysis
Radioimmunoassay
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
beta-Thromboglobulin - analysis
Abstract
Although intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) is recognized as one of the key mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis, our knowledge of the role of circulating growth factors for SMC in this process is limited. In the present study the plasma levels of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG), platelet factor 4 (PF 4) and total growth factor activity were determined in a group of 30 young postinfarction patients who had participated in an angiographic study of mechanisms associated with progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Significant correlations were found between the total growth factor activity in plasma and progression (r = 0.42, P
PubMed ID
1453123 View in PubMed
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Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds in a Real-World Patient Population-Results From a Mid-Term Angiographic Follow-Up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281934
Source
J Interv Cardiol. 2016 Aug;29(4):341-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Mohammed Saad
Amr Abdin
Holger Thiele
Steffen Desch
Pranvera Ibrahimi
Gerhard Wikstroem
Martin Hoeher
Michael Henein
Source
J Interv Cardiol. 2016 Aug;29(4):341-7
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorbable Implants - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Coronary Angiography - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) in daily use in a real-world patient population.
Between March 2013 and September 2014, 224 patients (233 lesions) were treated with BVS at a tertiary care center. Patients underwent follow-up coronary angiography 3-6 months after implantation. Clinical presentations were stable angina in 101 patients (45.1%), unstable angina in 47 (21.0%), NSTEMI in 38 (17.0%), and STEMI in 38 (17.0%) patients. Twenty-two patients (27 lesions) had chronic total occlusion (CTO). Procedural success was achieved in all patients. Two patients died in the follow-up period due to BVS thrombosis (0.9%). In-hospital death occurred in further 3 patients (1.3%) due to other causes not related to the BVS implantation. Total BVS thrombosis was 3.1% (7 patients) and there was only 1 case of relevant restenosis on angiographic follow-up. The overall incidence of major adverse cardiac events was 11 (4.9%).
Mid-term follow-up after implantation of BVS suggests a satisfactory safety profile and low restenosis rate in routine daily practice involving a large range of complex lesions.
PubMed ID
27329969 View in PubMed
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Bivalirudin versus heparin with primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299494
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 07; 201:9-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Dimitrios Venetsanos
Sofia Sederholm Lawesson
Stefan James
Sasha Koul
David Erlinge
Eva Swahn
Joakim Alfredsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Electronic address: dimitrios.venetsanos@liu.se.
Source
Am Heart J. 2018 07; 201:9-16
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Antithrombins - therapeutic use
Cause of Death - trends
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Restenosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Heparin - therapeutic use
Hirudins
Humans
Incidence
Male
Peptide Fragments - therapeutic use
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - methods
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Registries
Retrospective Studies
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - surgery
Stents
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Optimal adjunctive therapy in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with primary PCI (PPCI) remains a matter of debate. Our aim was to compare the efficacy and safety of bivalirudin to unfractionated heparin (UFH), with or without glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI) in a large real-world population, using data from the Swedish national registry, SWEDEHEART.
From 2008 to 2014 we identified 23,800 STEMI patients presenting within 12?hours from symptom onset treated with PPCI and UFH?±?GPI or bivalirudin±GPI. Primary outcomes included 30-day all-cause mortality and major in-hospital bleeding. Multivariable regression models and propensity score modelling were utilized to study adjusted association between treatment and outcome.
Treatment with UFH?±?GPI was associated with similar risk of 30-day mortality compared to bivalirudin±GPI (5.3% vs 5.5%, adjusted HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.82-1.07). The adjusted risk for 1-year mortality, 30-day and 1-year stent thrombosis and re-infarction did not differ significantly between UFH?±?GPI and bivalirudin±GPI. In contrast, treatment with UFH?±?GPI was associated with a significant higher risk of major in-hospital bleeding (adjusted OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.30-2.03). When including GPI use in the multivariable analysis, the difference was attenuated and no longer significant (adjusted OR 1.25; 95% CI 0.92-1.70).
Bivalirudin±GPI was associated with significantly lower risk for major inhospital bleeding but no significant difference in 30-day or one year mortality, stent thrombosis or re-infarction compared with UFH?±?GPI. The bleeding reduction associated with bivalirudin could be explained by the greater GPI use with UFH.
PubMed ID
29910059 View in PubMed
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68 records – page 1 of 7.