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636 records – page 1 of 64.

A 5-y follow-up of the radiation exposure to in-room personnel during cardiac catheterization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224582
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Renaud
Author Affiliation
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Montreal Heart Institute, Canada.
Source
Health Phys. 1992 Jan;62(1):10-5
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiac Catheterization
Coronary Angiography - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Personnel, Hospital
Quebec
Radiation Dosage
Thermoluminescent Dosimetry
Abstract
This study documents the radiation doses received by all in-room personnel of three cardiac catheterization laboratories where more than 15,000 cardiac procedures have been performed over a 5-y period. It is shown that all in-room personnel was exposed to a body dose equivalent well below any regulatory limits. However, some workers may have exceeded the occupational 150 mSv y-1 recommended limit for the lens of the eye. The physicians-in-training and the staff physicians are the two groups more likely to reach this limit. It is also demonstrated that a low correlation exists between the annual number of procedures and the annual head dose equivalent of a physician, but more variation is likely to originate from his/her working attitude and techniques. The mean dose equivalent at the collar level of the physicians is estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 mSv per procedure.
PubMed ID
1727405 View in PubMed
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7,528 patients treated with PCI--a Scandinavian real-life scenario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160536
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sune Pedersen
Søren Galatius
Jan Bech
Erik Jørgensen
Kari Saunamaki
Steffen Helqist
Jan Skov Jensen
Henning Kelbaek
Jan Kyst Madsen
Author Affiliation
Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory, Heart Clinic, Copenhagen, Denmark. sunped01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Stents - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Analyze clinical, temporal and procedural characteristics from 7,528 consecutive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in one of the largest published contemporary European PCI-database during a 6-year period.
Retrospective study design.
1998-2004. Temporal and referral changes in a Danish PCI-registry were analyzed. Demographic and angiographic variables were compared with data from randomized clinical trials, US-registries and current guidelines.
22,214 patients were examined with coronary angiography and 7,528 patients were treated with PCI. The annual number of PCI's increased by 15%. Over time, the fraction of patients with risk factors increased, median age increased from 61 to 64 years and the coronary pathology was significantly worsened. ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients primarily admitted to hospitals without facilities for primary angioplasty, were less likely to receive primary PCI. Baseline-data were in general in par with randomized clinical trial study populations and large-scale US data-registries. Interestingly, 14% of all PCI-procedures were performed on patients with a clinical presentation, for which coronary artery bypass grafting would be recommended by guidelines.
PCI is performed in an increasingly sicker population, but generally in accordance with randomized trials and similar to US tradition. However, 14% were treated with PCI even though coronary artery bypass grafting was recommended by guidelines.
PubMed ID
17971658 View in PubMed
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[10-12 years' clinical results in 300 initial patients undergoing aortocoronary bypass at the Montreal Cardiology Institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242152
Source
Union Med Can. 1983 Mar;112(3):229-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983

A 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcome of everolimus-eluting versus sirolimus-eluting coronary stents in patients with diabetes mellitus (the DiabeDES IV randomized angiography trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275976
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Michael Maeng
Arvydas Baranauskas
Evald Høj Christiansen
Anne Kaltoft
Niels Ramsing Holm
Lars Romer Krusell
Jan Ravkilde
Hans-Henrik Tilsted
Per Thayssen
Lisette Okkels Jensen
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2015 Dec 1;86(7):1161-7
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Agents - administration & dosage
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Restenosis - mortality - radiography
Coronary Stenosis - mortality - radiography - therapy
Coronary Thrombosis - mortality - radiography
Denmark
Diabetic Angiopathies - mortality - radiography - therapy
Drug-Eluting Stents
Everolimus - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - radiography
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Risk factors
Sirolimus - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We aimed to compare angiographic and clinical outcomes after the implantation of everolimus-eluting (EES) and sirolimus-eluting (SES) stents in patients with diabetes.
There are limited data on long-term outcome after EES vs SES implantation in diabetic patients.
We randomized 213 patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease to EES (n?=?108) or SES (n?=?105) implantation. Angiographic follow-up was performed 10 months after the index procedure and all patients were followed clinically for 4 years. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late luminal loss at 10-month follow-up. Secondary endpoints included angiographic restenosis rate, the need for target lesion revascularization (TLR) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE; defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, definite stent thrombosis, or TLR) at 4-year follow-up.
At 10-month angiographic follow-up, in-stent late lumen loss was 0.20?±?0.53 mm and 0.11?±?0.49 mm (P?=?0.28), and angiographic restenosis rate was 3.8% and 5.2% (P?=?0.72) in the EES and SES groups, respectively. At 4-year clinical follow-up, MACE had occurred in 22 (20.4%) patients in the EES group and 25 (23.8%) patients in SES group (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.47-1.49; P?=?0.55), with TLR performed in 6 (5.6%) and 10 (9.5%) patients in the two groups (HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.21-1-58; P?=?0.28).
EES and SES had comparable 10-month angiographic and 4-year clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.
PubMed ID
25640050 View in PubMed
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The 2011 outcome from the Swedish Health Care Registry on Heart Disease (SWEDEHEART).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108055
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Jan Harnek
Johan Nilsson
Orjan Friberg
Stefan James
Bo Lagerqvist
Kristina Hambraeus
Asa Cider
Lars Svennberg
Mona From Attebring
Claes Held
Per Johansson
Tomas Jernberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Coronary Heart Disease, Skåne University Hospital, Institution of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. jan.harnek@skane.se
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2013 Jun;47 Suppl 62:1-10
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Care Units - standards
Female
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Quality Improvement - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Registries
Secondary Prevention
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (SWEDEHEART) collects data to support the improvement of care for heart disease.
SWEDEHEART collects on-line data from consecutive patients treated at any coronary care unit n = (74), followed for secondary prevention, undergoing any coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, percutaneous valve or cardiac surgery. The registry is governed by an independent steering committee, the software is developed by Uppsala Clinical Research Center and it is funded by The Swedish national health care provider independent of industry support. Approximately 80,000 patients per year enter the database which consists of more than 3 million patients.
Base-line, procedural, complications and discharge data consists of several hundred variables. The data quality is secured by monitoring. Outcomes are validated by linkage to other registries such as the National Cause of Death Register, the National Patient Registry, and the National Registry of Drug prescriptions. Thanks to the unique social security number provided to all citizens follow-up is complete. The 2011 outcomes with special emphasis on patients more than 80 years of age are presented.
SWEDEHEART is a unique complete national registry for heart disease.
PubMed ID
23941732 View in PubMed
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The ability to achieve complete revascularization is associated with improved in-hospital survival in cardiogenic shock due to myocardial infarction: Manitoba cardiogenic SHOCK Registry investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134718
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
Farrukh Hussain
Roger K Philipp
Robin A Ducas
Jason Elliott
Vladimír D┼żavík
Davinder S Jassal
James W Tam
Daniel Roberts
Philip J Garber
John Ducas
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology Dept. of Cardiac Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. fhussain@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - mortality
Cardiovascular Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Catheterization, Swan-Ganz
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Odds Ratio
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Shock, Cardiogenic - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To identify predictors of survival in a retrospective multicentre cohort of patients with cardiogenic shock undergoing coronary angiography and to address whether complete revascularization is associated with improved survival in this cohort.
Early revascularization is the standard of care for cardiogenic shock. Coronary bypass grafting and percutaneous intervention have complimentary roles in achieving this revascularization.
A total of 210 consecutive patients (mean age 66 ± 12 years) at two tertiary centres from 2002 to 2006 inclusive with a diagnosis of cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate predictors of in-hospital survival were identified utilizing logistic regression.
ST elevation infarction occurred in 67% of patients. Thrombolysis was administered in 34%, PCI was attempted in 62% (88% stented, 76% TIMI 3 flow), CABG was performed in 22% (2.7 grafts, 14 valve procedures), and medical therapy alone was administered to the remainder. The overall survival to discharge was 59% (CABG 68%, PCI 57%, medical 48%). Independent predictors of mortality included complete revascularization (P = 0.013, OR = 0.26 (95% CI: 0.09-0.76), hyperlactatemia (P = 0.046, OR = 1.14 (95% CI: 1.002-1.3) per mmol increase), baseline renal insufficiency (P = 0.043, OR = 3.45, (95% CI: 1.04-11.4), and the presence of anoxic brain injury (P = 0.008, OR = 8.22 (95% CI: 1.73-39.1). Within the STEMI with concomitant multivessel coronary disease subgroup of this population (N = 101), independent predictors of survival to discharge included complete revascularization (P = 0.03, OR = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.1-6.2)) and peak lactate (P = 0.02).
The ability to achieve complete revascularization may be strongly associated with improved in-hospital survival in patients with cardiogenic shock.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):549-5021953751
PubMed ID
21547996 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of noninvasive stress myocardial imaging for detecting coronary artery disease in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143550
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Leonard Schwartz
Christopher B Overgaard
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. Dr.Leonard.Schwartz@uhn.on.ca
Source
Hosp Pract (1995). 2010 Apr;38(2):14-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Coronary Angiography - standards
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Echocardiography - standards
Exercise Test - standards
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Sensitivity and specificity
Sex Distribution
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon - standards
Abstract
There is a wide variation in reported accuracy ofnoninvasive stress myocardial imaging as a screening tool for coronary artery disease (CAD). This study was undertaken to determine its current accuracy in a wide spectrum of patients with chest pain syndromes using invasive coronary angiography as the gold standard.
The patient population consisted of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography in whom noninvasive stress imaging, either nuclear or echocardiographic, was performed within 6 months prior to the angiogram. The specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive values, and diagnostic accuracy for detecting > or =1 lesions with > or =50% diameter coronary stenosis were determined for each modality.
Of the 227 eligible patients, 141 were men and 86 were women; 70% had significant CAD. The diagnostic accuracy overall was 71% and was no different for nuclear or echocardiographic testing. The positive predictive value (86% vs. 52%; P = 0.002) and diagnostic accuracy (83% vs. 51%; P = 0.002) were better in men than in women.
In this study, noninvasive stress imaging lacked the accuracy of a good screening test for significant CAD. This finding was particularly true for women, for whom it was not much better than a coin toss.
PubMed ID
20469609 View in PubMed
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Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
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636 records – page 1 of 64.