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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Abundance and diversity of human-biting flies (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, Culicidae, Tabanidae, Simuliidae) around a nickel-copper smelter at Monchegorsk, northwestern Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169895
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
M V Kozlov
N K Brodskaya
A. Haarto
K. Kuusela
M. Schäfer
V. Zverev
Author Affiliation
Section ofEcology, Department ofBiology, University of Turku, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland.
Source
J Vector Ecol. 2005 Dec;30(2):263-71
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bites and Stings - epidemiology
Ceratopogonidae - growth & development
Copper - toxicity
Culicidae - growth & development
Diptera - growth & development
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Humans
Nickel - toxicity
Population Density
Population Dynamics
Russia
Seasons
Simuliidae - growth & development
Species Specificity
Abstract
In the summers of 2001 and 2002, we quantitatively sampled human-biting flies in twelve sites located 1.6 to 63 km from a large copper-nickel smelter at Monchegorsk on the Kola Peninsula, Russia. We collected 429 specimens of three species of Ceratopogonidae, 92 specimens of seven species of Culicidae, 76 specimens of seven species of Tabanidae, and 4,788 specimens of 19 species of Simuliidae. Culicoides chiropterus was for the first time reported from the Kola Peninsula. Catches of Culicidae and Simuliidae decreased near the smelter, presumably due to the combined action of toxicity of pollutants, pollution-induced forest damage, and decline in vertebrate density. An abundance of Ceratopogonidae and Tabanidae, the size of the most common black fly species, Simulium pusillum, and the diversity of all families did not change along the pollution gradient.
PubMed ID
16599161 View in PubMed
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Copper toxicity in Bristol Bay headwaters: Part 1-Acute mortality and ambient water quality criteria in low-hardness water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299742
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 01; 38(1):190-197
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-2019
Author
Jeffrey M Morris
Stephen F Brinkman
Michael W Carney
Joshua Lipton
Author Affiliation
Abt Associates, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 01; 38(1):190-197
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Bays
Biological Assay
Copper - toxicity
Cyprinidae - physiology
Fresh Water
Hardness
Ligands
Oncorhynchus mykiss - physiology
Toxicity Tests
Water - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Quality
Abstract
The world-class Alaskan Bristol Bay salmon fishery and vast deposits of copper (Cu) and other metals in the watershed warrant further investigation into the potential toxicity of Cu to salmonids under the low water-hardness conditions that occur in the watershed. Therefore we investigated the acute toxicity of Cu to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in low-hardness water (~ 30?mg/L as CaCO3 ) formulated in the laboratory and collected from the Bristol Bay watershed. The median lethal concentration (LC50) for rainbow trout exposed to Cu in low-hardness laboratory water was 16?µg Cu/L (95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 12, 21; dissolved Cu, filtered to 0.45?µm). The LC50 values for fathead minnows exposed to Cu in low-hardness laboratory water or site water were 29 and 79?µg Cu/L (95% CIs: 23, 35 and 58, 125; dissolved Cu), respectively. The biotic ligand model (BLM) LC50 estimates for these bioassays were 1.3 to 2.3 times higher than the actual LC50 values. We also calculated and analyzed acute Cu water quality criteria, also known as criterion maximum concentration (CMC), using hardness-based methods and the BLM for water samples collected throughout the Bristol Bay watershed in 2007. Biotic ligand model CMCs ranged from 0.05 to 17.5?µg Cu/L and hardness-based CMCs ranged from 2.3 to 6.1?µg Cu/L for the 65 samples analyzed. Our results show the need for site-specific research and subsequent water quality guidelines in low-hardness aquatic habitats. Environ Toxicol Chem 2019;38:190-197. © 2018 SETAC.
PubMed ID
30125979 View in PubMed
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Copper toxicity in Bristol Bay headwaters: Part 2-Olfactory inhibition in low-hardness water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299737
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 01; 38(1):198-209
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
01-2019
Author
Jeffrey M Morris
Stephen F Brinkman
Ryan Takeshita
Andrew K McFadden
Michael W Carney
Joshua Lipton
Author Affiliation
Abt Associates, Boulder, Colorado, USA.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2019 01; 38(1):198-209
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Animals
Bays
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Biological Assay
Copper - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Hardness
Olfactory Bulb - drug effects
Oncorhynchus mykiss - physiology
Probability
Toxicity Tests
Video Recording
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Water Quality
Abstract
We investigated the olfactory toxicity of copper (Cu) to rainbow trout in low-hardness (27?mg/L as CaCO3 ) water formulated in the laboratory over a 120-h period using a flow-through design. The fish's response to an alarm cue (e.g., reduction in activity) was recorded to determine the exposure concentrations and durations that inhibited olfactory detection of the cue after 3, 24, 48, and 96?h of Cu exposure and after 24?h of clean water recovery following the 96-h exposure period. Exposures were conducted with a range of Cu concentrations from 0.13 (control) to 7.14?µg Cu/L (dissolved Cu). We observed a dose-dependent response in olfactory inhibition with a 20% reduction in the probability of responding to the alarm cue, relative to controls, at 2.7 and 2.4?µg Cu/L after 24 or 96?h of exposure, respectively. Olfactory inhibition manifested between 3 and 24?h of exposure. Our 24- and 96-h 20% olfactory inhibition estimates fell between the criteria derived using the biotic ligand model (BLM; criterion maximum concentration [CMC] and criterion continuous concentration [CCC] values were 0.63 and 0.39?µg Cu/L, respectively) and water hardness-based criteria (CMC and CCC values were 3.9 and 2.9?µg Cu/L, respectively). Therefore, the hardness-based criteria do not appear to be protective and the BLM-derived criteria do appear to be protective against Cu-induced olfactory inhibition given our test water chemistry. Neither the hardness-based criteria nor the BLM-derived criteria appear to be protective against our estimated Cu behavioral avoidance response concentrations at 24- and 96-h exposures (0.54 and 0.50?µg Cu/L, respectively). Environ Toxicol Chem 2019;38:198-209. © 2018 SETAC.
PubMed ID
30298944 View in PubMed
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Effects of copper on enchytraeids in the field under differing soil moisture regimes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82689
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2006 Feb;25(2):604-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Maraldo Kristine
Christensen Bent
Strandberg Beate
Holmstrup Martin
Author Affiliation
Department of Terrestrial Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, PO Box 314, Silkeborg, Denmark.
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2006 Feb;25(2):604-12
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Copper - toxicity
Environmental Exposure
Oligochaeta
Risk assessment
Seasons
Soil
Soil Pollutants - toxicity
Water
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate the combined effects of drought stress and copper pollution on enchytraeids under natural conditions in the field and to compare the results of laboratory toxicity tests with results of the field study. Such studies were conducted to increase the understanding of interactions between chemicals and natural stressors and assess the predictive value of standardized laboratory tests with enchytraeids. The combined effect of copper and summer drought on enchytraeids was investigated in an old copper-contaminated field site at Hygum, Denmark, in three areas with different copper burdens. Each area consisted of five plots, which were divided into two subplots: one control and one drought subplot in which precipitation was excluded for a 45-d period during summer. Enchytraeids were sampled in spring (before the enforced drought began) and in autumn (after recovery from drought). Clear effects of copper were evident in both the field and the laboratory experiment. The field population density and species composition was highly affected by copper at concentrations in the range 300 to 500 mg Cu/kg dry soil and higher. In particular, a greatly impoverished species diversity was found in the copper-polluted areas. The effects of copper in the field compared reasonably well with the results of the laboratory tests. Surprisingly, possible effects of summer drought in the field were not detected in the autumn sampling, perhaps because of rapid recovery of the enchytraeid populations in both unpolluted and copper-polluted areas.
PubMed ID
16519325 View in PubMed
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Effects of copper sulfate on black bindweed (Polygonum convolvulus L.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96010
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 1996 Mar;33(2):110-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
Kjaer C.
Elmegaard N.
Author Affiliation
Department of Terrestrial Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, Silkeborg, Denmark.
Source
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 1996 Mar;33(2):110-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomass
Copper - toxicity
Copper Sulfate
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Greenhouse Effect
Lethal Dose 50
Plants, Medicinal - drug effects - growth & development - physiology
Reproduction - drug effects
Seeds - drug effects - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - toxicity
Sulfates - toxicity
Abstract
Seedlings of black bindweed (Polygonum convolvulus L.) were transplanted to soil contaminated with copper sulfate at different dosages. These plants were followed until maturity under greenhouse conditions, and measures of mortality, growth, and reproduction were obtained from harvests 21, 34, and 105 days after the transplant. It was found that application of 125 mg Cu2+ kg-1 resulted in 1.7% lifetime mortality increasing to 100% at 500 mg kg-1. The mortality was dependent on exposure time. No further mortality was observed after 50 days. The population consisted of a relatively tolerant and a sensitive group. This was indicated by differences in lifetime of plants treated with 500 mg kg-1 and by a diversification in biomass of individuals dying from treatment with 315 mg kg-1. The plants surviving treatment had reduced biomass and seed production at dosages above 200 mg kg-1.
PubMed ID
8723747 View in PubMed
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Gill metal binding and stress gene transcription in brown trout (Salmo trutta) exposed to metal environments: the effect of pre-exposure in natural populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77611
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2007 May;26(5):944-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Hansen Bjørn Henrik
Garmo Oyvind A
Olsvik Pål A
Andersen Rolf A
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology. bjorn.h.hansen@sinetef.no
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2007 May;26(5):944-53
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cadmium - toxicity
Catalase - genetics - metabolism
Copper - toxicity
Gills - drug effects - metabolism
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Glutathione Reductase - genetics - metabolism
HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Metallothionein - genetics - metabolism
Metals - toxicity
Norway
Oxidative Stress - drug effects - physiology
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
Transcription, Genetic - drug effects - physiology
Trout
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Zinc - toxicity
Abstract
Brown trout (Salmo trutta) from two native populations from the Røros area in Central Norway, acclimated in mining-affected habitats to different levels of Cd/Zn and Cu, together with trout from a nearby unaffected river (reference) were transferred to a nearby lake with higher levels of Cu, Cd, and Zn than those in their respective native rivers. This experiment was conducted to gain information about the underlying resistance mechanisms developed in fish exposed to metal environments. The focus was on gill metal accumulation and transcription of the metal-responsive stress genes metallothionein-A (MT-A), Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70). The only shared response shown between the three groups after transfer were Cu accumulation and MT-A induction. The Cu-acclimated trout produced mucus to reduce the uptake of Cu into the gills. The MT-A levels were highest in the Cd/Zn-acclimated trout both before and after transfer. Before transfer, antioxidant transcription (SOD and GPx) was higher in gills of Cu-acclimated compared to the Cd/Zn-acclimated trout, but increased transcription of antioxidant stress genes was observed after transfer in both metal-acclimated groups. The metal-acclimated trout groups also showed an increase in the transcription of HSP-70. Compared to the reference population not previously exposed to metals, stress gene transcription increased faster in the metal-acclimated populations. The exception was induction of CAT, which appeared to be depressed after transfer in Cd/Zn-acclimated trout. The data indicate that acclimation to chronic metal exposure involves different strategies to cope with different metals and that these strategies involve both physiological mechanisms (mucus production) as well as metal-related stress gene transcription.
PubMed ID
17521141 View in PubMed
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[Hygienic evaluation of the technological processes of drying and autogenic smelting of copper concentrates in vertical oxygen converters].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235156
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1987 Jun;(6):38-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1987

Impact of effects of acid precipitation on toxicity of metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39452
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1985 Nov;63:169-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1985
Author
G F Nordberg
R A Goyer
T W Clarkson
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1985 Nov;63:169-80
Date
Nov-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - toxicity
Aerosols
Air Pollutants, Environmental - toxicity
Aluminum - toxicity
Animals
Arsenic - toxicity
Asbestos - toxicity
Cadmium - toxicity
Copper - toxicity
Diet
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fetus - drug effects
Forecasting
Hematopoiesis - drug effects
Humans
Lead - toxicity
Mercury - toxicity
Metals - toxicity
Methylmercury Compounds - toxicity
Microtubules - drug effects
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Pregnancy
Rain
Selenium - toxicity
Sweden
United States
Water supply
Abstract
Acid precipitation may increase human exposure to several potentially toxic metals by increasing metal concentrations in major pathways to man, particularly food and water, and in some instances by enhancing the conversion of metal species to more toxic forms. Human exposures to methylmercury are almost entirely by way of consumption of fish and seafood. In some countries, intakes by this route may approach the levels that can give rise to adverse health effects for population groups with a high consumption of these food items. A possible increase in methylmercury concentrations in fish from lakes affected by acid precipitation may thus be of concern to selected population groups. Human exposures to lead reach levels that are near those associated with adverse health effects in certain sensitive segments of the general population in several countries. The possibility exists that increased exposures to lead may be caused by acid precipitation through a mobilization of lead from soils into crops. A route of exposure to lead that may possibly be influenced by acid precipitation is an increased deterioration of surface materials containing lead and a subsequent ingestion by small children. A similar situation with regard to uptake from food exists for cadmium (at least in some countries). Human metal exposures via drinking water may be increased by acid precipitation. Decreasing pH increases corrosiveness of water enhancing the mobilization of metal salts from soil; metallic compounds may be mobilized from minerals, which may eventually reach drinking water. Also, the dissolution of metals (Pb, Cd, Cu) from piping systems for drinking water by soft acidic waters of high corrosivity may increase metal concentrations in drinking water. Exposures have occasionally reached concentrations which are in the range where adverse health effects may be expected in otherwise healthy persons. Dissolution from piping systems can be prevented by neutralizing the water before distribution. Increased aluminum concentrations in water is a result mainly of the occurrence of Al in acidified natural waters and the use of Al chemicals in drinking water purification. If such water is used for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure, it may give rise to cases of dialysis dementia and other disorders. A possible influence on health of persons with normal renal function (e.g., causing Alzheimer's disease) is uncertain and requires further investigation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3908087 View in PubMed
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Mortality among population with exposure to industrial air pollution containing nickel and other toxic metals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124564
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2012 May;54(5):583-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Kari Pasanen
Eero Pukkala
Anu W Turunen
Toni Patama
Ilkka Jussila
Sari Makkonen
Raimo O Salonen
Pia K Verkasalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kari.pasanen@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2012 May;54(5):583-91
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Alzheimer Disease - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Copper - toxicity
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Nickel - toxicity
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess disease mortality among people with exposure to metal-rich particulate air pollution.
We conducted a cohort study on mortality from 1981 to 2005 among 33,573 people living near a nickel/copper smelter in Harjavalta, Finland. Nickel concentration in soil humus was selected as an indicator for long-term exposure. Relative risks--adjusted for age, socioeconomic status, and calendar period--were calculated for three exposure zones.
The relative risks for diseases of the circulatory system by increasing exposure were 0.93 (95% confidence interval = 0.79 to 1.09), 1.20 (1.04 to 1.39), and 1.18 (1.00 to 1.39) among men and 1.01 (0.88 to 1.17), 1.20 (1.04 to 1.38), and 1.14 (0.97 to 1.33) among women. Exclusion of smelter workers from the cohort did not materially change the results.
Long-term environmental exposure to metal-rich air pollution was associated with increased mortality from circulatory diseases.
PubMed ID
22569477 View in PubMed
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Temperature-dependent physiological response of Carcinus maenas exposed to copper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53336
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2004 Aug-Dec;58(2-5):781-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Camus
P E Davies
J I Spicer
M B Jones
Author Affiliation
School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA, UK. lionel.camus@rf.no
Source
Mar Environ Res. 2004 Aug-Dec;58(2-5):781-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Brachyura - drug effects - physiology
Comparative Study
Copper - toxicity
Heart Arrest - chemically induced
Heart Rate - drug effects - physiology
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seawater
Temperature
Abstract
The effect of temperature on the heart rate (fH) of Carcinus maenas exposed to a sublethal nominal concentration (0.5 mg l(-1)) of copper is reported. Adult, intermoult males (4 cm carapace width) were collected from Stavanger Fjord (Norway) in August (seawater TEMPERATURE=17 degrees C) and maintained in the laboratory (fed ad libitum) at 5, 15 and 25 degrees C for 7 days. Following this holding period, crabs were exposed to waterborne copper at the same temperature. After 3 days of exposure, individual fH was measured using the non-invasive Computer Aided Physiological MONitoring system (CAPMON) method. Copper-exposed individuals demonstrated significantly increased fH compared with controls at 5 and 25 degrees C (P
PubMed ID
15178113 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.