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1427 records – page 1 of 143.

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness, part 1: contextualizing case management for ending homelessness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130590
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, AB, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2011 Nov-Dec;16(6):281-7; quiz 288-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management
Community Health Services
Concept Formation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Homeless Persons
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, organizational
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Program Development - methods
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and part-2 articulates the 6 Dimensions of Quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are: (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
21986969 View in PubMed
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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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[2009 3M clinical award for innovation. Home care: collaboration between nurses' aide and nurse].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143928
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2010 May-Jun;7(3):7
Publication Type
Article

'About time!' Insights from Research with Pride: a community-student collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131754
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kira A Abelsohn
Jessica M Ferne
Kyle A Scanlon
Broden L Giambrone
Sivan B Bomze
Author Affiliation
The 519 Church Street Community Centre, Toronto, Canada. kira.abelsohn@gmail.com
Source
Health Promot Int. 2012 Sep;27(3):372-81
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Community-Based Participatory Research
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Homosexuality, Female
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Ontario
Students
Universities
Abstract
Research with Pride (RwP) was a community-student collaborative initiative to promote and build capacity for community-based research exploring health and wellness in lesbian, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) communities. The event took place at University of Toronto's Dalla Lana School of Public Health (DLSPH) in September 2009, and engaged over 100 students, community members and academic researchers in a full day of discussion, learning and networking. RwP was initiated by a group of graduate students in Health Promotion who identified a gap in resources addressing LGBTQ health, facilitating their further learning and work in this area. By engaging in a partnership with a community service organization serving LGBTQ communities in downtown Toronto, RwP emerges as a key example of the role of community-student partnerships in the pursuit of LGBTQ health promotion. This paper will describe the nature of this partnership, outline its strengths and challenges and emphasize the integral role of community-student partnerships in health promotion initiatives.
PubMed ID
21880613 View in PubMed
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Academic administrators' attitudes towards interprofessional education in Canadian schools of health professional education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173370
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Vernon R Curran
Diana R Deacon
Lisa Fleet
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care
Questionnaires
Schools, Health Occupations
Abstract
Interprofessional education is an approach to educating and training students and practitioners from different health professions to work in a collaborative manner in providing client and/or patient-centred care. The introduction and successful implementation of this educational approach is dependent on a variety of factors, including the attitudes of students, faculty, senior academic administrators (e.g., deans and directors) and practitioners. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education amongst academic administrators of post-secondary health professional education programs in Canada. A web-based questionnaire in English and French was distributed via e-mail messaging during January 2004 to academic administrators in Canada representing medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, occupational therapy and physiotherapy post-secondary educational programs. Responses were sought on attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education, as well as opinions regarding barriers to interprofessional education and subject areas that lend themselves to interprofessional education. In general, academic administrators responding to the survey hold overall positive attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education practices, and the results indicate there were no significant differences between professions in relation to these attitudinal perspectives. The main barriers to interprofessional education were problems with scheduling/calendar, rigid curriculum, turf battles and lack of perceived value. The main pre-clinical subject areas which respondents believed would lend themselves to interprofessional education included community health/prevention, ethics, communications, critical appraisal, and epidemiology. The results of this study suggest that a favourable perception of both interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education exists amongst academic administrators of Canadian health professional education programs. If this is the case, the post-secondary system in Canada is primed for the introduction of interprofessional education initiatives which support the development of client and patient-centred collaborative practice competencies.
PubMed ID
16096147 View in PubMed
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Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
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Academic vascular unit collaboration with advertising agency yields higher compliance in screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263583
Source
J Med Screen. 2014 Dec;21(4):216-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Moncef Zarrouk
Anders Gottsäter
Martin Malina
Jan Holst
Source
J Med Screen. 2014 Dec;21(4):216-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - economics
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Cooperative Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Odds Ratio
Patient compliance
Sweden
Abstract
To improve compliance with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening in low compliance areas, individually tailored invitations were developed in collaboration with a professional advertising agency. Compliance increased in two intervention municipalities from 71.4% in 2010-2012 to 78.1% in 2013 (p?=?0.025), and was then higher [odds ratio 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.6; p?=?0.013] than in two control municipalities in which compliance was unchanged (417/552 [75.5%] in 2010-12 and 122/180 [67.8%] in 2013). Compliance with AAA-screening can be increased by collaboration with a professional advertising agency, albeit at a comparably high cost.
PubMed ID
25118161 View in PubMed
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'Access arrangements' for biobanks: a fine line between facilitating and hindering collaboration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141708
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2011;14(2):104-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
S. Fortin
S. Pathmasiri
R. Grintuch
M. Deschênes
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Montreal, Montreal, Que., Canada.
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2011;14(2):104-14
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - economics - organization & administration
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Genetic Research
Genomics
Humans
Informed consent
Public Health
Public Policy
Tissue Banks - organization & administration
Abstract
This decade is witnessing the proliferation of large-scale population-based biobanks. Many biobanks have reached the stage of offering access to their collection of data and samples to the scientific community. This, however, requires that access arrangements be established to govern the relationship between biobanks and users. Access arrangements capture the convergence of all normative elements in the life cycle of a biobank: policies, laws, common practices, commitments made by the biobank to participants, the expectations of funders, and the needs of the scientific community. Furthermore, access arrangements shape new legal agreements between 'biobankers' and researchers to ensure appropriate, regulated and efficient use of biobank materials. This paper begins by examining the particularities of access arrangements, identifying the key elements of these new regulatory instruments. Second, the paper looks at various strategies used by biobanks to regulate access and surveys the underlying motivations of these strategies and the impact they can have on potential international collaboration. Third, an example of the challenges encountered in creating access policy is illustrated using the case of CARTaGENE, a biobank based in Montreal, Canada. Last, the paper presents how Public Population Project in Genomics (P(3)G) facilitates the work of biobankers and improves collaboration throughout the international human genomics research community.
PubMed ID
20689244 View in PubMed
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Access Governance for Biobanks: The Case of the BioSHaRE-EU Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279361
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Jane Kaye
Linda Briceño Moraia
Colin Mitchell
Jessica Bell
Jasper Adriaan Bovenberg
Anne-Marie Tassé
Bartha Maria Knoppers
Source
Biopreserv Biobank. 2016 Jun;14(3):201-6
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - legislation & jurisprudence
Cooperative Behavior
Databases, Factual
European Union
Finland
Germany
Humans
Information Dissemination - legislation & jurisprudence
Interprofessional Relations
Netherlands
Norway
United Kingdom
Abstract
Currently, researchers have to apply separately to individual biobanks if they want to carry out studies that use samples and data from multiple biobanks. This article analyzes the access governance arrangements of the original five biobank members of the Biobank Standardisation and Harmonisation for Research Excellence in the European Union (BioSHaRE-EU) project in Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom to identify similarities and differences in policies and procedures, and consider the potential for internal policy "harmonization." Our analysis found differences in the range of researchers and organizations eligible to access biobanks; application processes; requirements for Research Ethics Committee approval; and terms of Material Transfer Agreements relating to ownership and commercialization. However, the main elements of access are the same across biobanks; access will be granted to bona fide researchers conducting research in the public interest, and all biobanks will consider the scientific merit of the proposed use and it's compatibility with the biobank's objectives. These findings suggest potential areas for harmonization across biobanks. This could be achieved through a single centralized application to a number of biobanks or a system of mutual recognition that places a presumption in favor of access to one biobank if already approved by another member of the same consortium. Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure-European Research Infrastructure Consortia (BBMRI-ERIC), a European consortium of biobanks and bioresources with its own ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) common service, could provide a platform by developing guidelines for harmonized internal processes.
PubMed ID
27183185 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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1427 records – page 1 of 143.