Skip header and navigation

Refine By

24 records – page 1 of 3.

Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
Less detail

An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers and enhancers to dietary behaviour change for Aboriginal people attending a diabetes cooking course.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144096
Source
Health Promot J Austr. 2010 Apr;21(1):33-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Penelope Abbott
Joyce Davison
Louise Moore
Raechelle Rubinstein
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney, New South Wales. pennyab@amsws.org.au
Source
Health Promot J Austr. 2010 Apr;21(1):33-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cooking - methods
Diabetes Mellitus - diet therapy
Family
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - education - psychology
Patient compliance
Patient Education as Topic
Social Environment
Young Adult
Abstract
Aboriginal people access diabetes and nutrition education less than non-Aboriginal people. Culturally appropriate, effective and accessible diabetes and nutrition education for Aboriginal people is urgently needed.
A qualitative approach was used to explore the experiences of Aboriginal people who had attended cooking courses run at the Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney between 2002 and 2007. Data from 23 semi-structured interviews were analysed thematically.
Despite reported improvements in nutrition knowledge and cooking skills, the ability of participants to implement desired dietary changes varied. A new health diagnosis, such as diabetes, pre-diabetes, heart disease or cancer and the desire of participants to influence their families to lead healthier, diabetes-free lives were strong motivators for dietary change. In contrast, lack of family support for dietary change and a sense of social isolation caused by dietary change strongly impeded some participants' attempts to improve their diets. Other significant barriers were poor oral health and depression, the higher cost of healthier food and generational food preferences.
Aboriginal cooking course participants faced multiple barriers to dietary change - social, financial, medical and historical. The family was the most crucial determinant of participant ability to achieve sustained dietary change.
PubMed ID
20406150 View in PubMed
Less detail

Boiled coffee consumption and the risk of prostate cancer: follow-up of 224,234 Norwegian men 20-69 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261765
Source
Br J Cancer. 2015 Feb 3;112(3):576-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-2015
Author
A. Tverdal
Source
Br J Cancer. 2015 Feb 3;112(3):576-9
Date
Feb-3-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coffee
Cooking - methods
Drinking Behavior
Follow-Up Studies
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
There is insufficient epidemiological evidence on the relationship between type of coffee and the risk of prostate cancer.
The risk of prostate cancer by use of boiled vs not boiled coffee were assessed in a prospective study of 224,234 men 20-69 years. 5740 incident prostate cancers were identified.
With no coffee as reference group the hazard ratios of
PubMed ID
25535729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coffee drinking is dose-dependently related to the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178637
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Sep;134(9):2381-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Pertti Happonen
Sari Voutilainen
Jukka T Salonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pertti.happonen@uku.fi
Source
J Nutr. 2004 Sep;134(9):2381-6
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Central Nervous System Stimulants - administration & dosage
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Cooking - methods
Diet Records
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drinking
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Abstract
Heavy coffee consumption has been associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) risk although many studies have not observed any relation. We studied the effect of coffee consumption, assessed with a 4-d food record, on the incidence of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction or coronary death in a cohort of 1971 men who were 42 to 60 y old and free of symptomatic CHD at baseline in 1984-1989. During a mean follow-up of 14 y, 269 participants experienced an acute coronary event. After adjustment for age, smoking, exercise ischemia, diabetes, income, and serum insulin concentration, the rate ratios (95% CIs) in daily nondrinkers and light (375 mL or less), moderate (reference level), and heavy (814 mL or more) drinkers were 0.84 (0.41-1.72), 1.22 (0.90-1.64), 1.00, and 1.43 (1.06-1.94). To address time dependence of the effect, the analysis was repeated for 75 CHD events that occurred during the first 5 y; the respective rate ratios were 0.42 (0.06-3.10), 2.00 (1.16-3.44), 1.00, and 2.07 (1.17-3.65). Further adjustment for serum HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration, diastolic blood pressure, maximal oxygen uptake, and waist-hip ratio slightly increased the rate ratio for heavy coffee intake. Neither the brewing method (boiling vs. filtering) nor the serum LDL cholesterol concentration had any impact on the risk estimates for coffee intake. In conclusion, heavy coffee consumption increases the short-term risk of acute myocardial infarction or coronary death, independent of the brewing method or currently recognized risk factors for CHD.
PubMed ID
15333732 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cooking in prison--from crook to cook.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267555
Source
Int J Prison Health. 2014;10(4):228-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Linda Kjaer Minke
Source
Int J Prison Health. 2014;10(4):228-38
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Humans
Prisoners - psychology
Prisons - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the principle and practice of self-catering system in a Danish prison. Self-catering is a reflection of the Danish correctional principle of normalisation between prison and community life. Unlike some other jurisdiction, issues of control in meal preparation are subordinate to prisoners' right to choose and prepare their own food.
Findings are derived from 13 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish maximum security prison for men, including in-depth interviews with 68 prisoners.
Overall findings showed that thinking about meals and their preparation is time consuming for prisoners who tend to be positive about the system making connections with their ability to exercise responsibility for making healthily choices. The research concludes that prisoners' possibility for developing cooking competences during incarceration could support prisoners change in social identity from crook to cook.
Food is a fundamental need and the ability to choose what to eat and to prepare one's own food should be a right for all people, including prisoners. This research shows that Danish prisoners are very pleased about the system of self-catering. Most prisoners are concerned about preparing their own meals according to their taste and cultural diversity. If the prison offers the opportunity to train as a chef during imprisonment it could support the prisoner's change in social identity from crook to cook on the outside.
PubMed ID
25764291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary habits and health beliefs of Chinese Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150391
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Stephanie Kwok
Linda Mann
Kwan Wong
Ilya Blum
Author Affiliation
Dietitians of Canada, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):73-80
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
China - ethnology
Cooking - methods
Demography
Diet - ethnology - psychology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Fruit
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hong Kong - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Sciences - education
Ontario
Probability
Questionnaires
Taiwan - ethnology
Vegetables
Abstract
The relationships among dietary behaviours, traditional health beliefs (THB), and demographic characteristics of Chinese Canadians living in Toronto were examined, as were their primary sources of nutrition information.
Through the use of probability sampling, 106 adult subjects who originated from China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan were recruited from five Chinese community organizations. A telephone interview, employing a tested questionnaire, was conducted in Cantonese or Mandarin. All data were analyzed with MS Excel and SPSS statistical software.
Dietary acculturation is gradual and individual. Participants reported regular intakes of fruits and vegetables and fat-reducing behaviours. Most used both Chinese and Western cooking methods. Practices based on traditional Chinese health beliefs (THB), such as balancing yin and yang foods to promote health, were prevalent. Participants were grouped as THB-strong, THB-moderate, or THB-weak, on the basis of their health belief scores. Various significant relationships among the variables were identified. Chinese media, friends, and family were the primary sources of nutrition information; dietitians were identified by only 12%.
This is the first study to apply a THB grouping for Chinese Canadians. Results will provide an important basis for nutrition interventions to encourage immigrants to make healthy food choices, using both traditional and Western foods.
PubMed ID
19515270 View in PubMed
Less detail

The domestic foodscapes of young low-income women in Montreal: cooking practices in the context of an increasingly processed food supply.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149054
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2010 Apr;37(2):211-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Rachel Engler-Stringer
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. rachel.engler-stringer@usask.ca
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2010 Apr;37(2):211-26
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Food Preferences
Food Supply
Gender Identity
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Learning
Poverty
Social Environment
Urban Population
Young Adult
Abstract
Over the course of the past century, the quantity of prepackaged, pre-prepared foods available in the North American context has increased dramatically. This study examines the shifts in food practices that are taking place through an exploration of the day-to-day cooking practices of a group of young, low-income women in Montreal and considers how these contribute to health problems such as obesity and nutritional deficiencies in addition to health inequalities within populations. The participatory study uses data from five focus groups with a total of 22 participants to contribute to our understanding of how social and physical food environments (the "foodscape") shape daily food and cooking practices. Aspects of these environments that were discussed include household roles and responsibilities that require complex management, personal food choice and skill, as well as health, learning, and access to food.
PubMed ID
19690290 View in PubMed
Less detail

Egg consumption patterns and Salmonella risk in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177328
Source
J Food Prot. 2004 Nov;67(11):2416-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
S. Lievonen
A S Havulinna
R. Maiala
Author Affiliation
Department of Risk Assessment, National Veterinary and Food Research Institute, P.O. Box 45, 00581 Helsinki, Finland. satu.lievonen@eela.fi
Source
J Food Prot. 2004 Nov;67(11):2416-23
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cooking - methods
Data Collection - methods
Eggs - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Handling - methods
Humans
Hygiene
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Abstract
To estimate the consumer risk of contracting Salmonella infection via shell eggs and to evaluate the effect of possible preventative measures, quantitative microbiological risk assessment is being developed in Finland. As a part of the risk assessment, a survey of 918 respondents was conducted to study how households purchase, store, handle, and use eggs. In addition, suitability of the Internet as a survey method was compared with a postal survey. Shell eggs were usually purchased once every 2 weeks (41% of all the respondents). Ninety-one percent of the respondents bought eggs in groceries and 93% stored eggs at chilled temperatures. The majority of the respondents (80%) only had eggs in their home for which the best-before date had not expired. Only 34% of the respondents said that they always washed their hands after breaking eggs. Consumption of well-cooked eggs accounted for 84%, consumption of soft-boiled eggs for 12%, and consumption of raw eggs for 4% of the total amount of eggs consumed. The elderly used eggs more frequently than the whole population, but the consumption of raw egg dishes decreased with age. The Internet survey was a rapid method for transmitting information, but its response rate was low (9%), and it did not appear to be a suitable tool for data collection in a general population. The results indicate that although the majority of the respondents had safe egg-handling practices, a substantial minority of the consumers had risk-prone behavior.
PubMed ID
15553622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluating a food bank recipe-tasting program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172905
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(3):183-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Susan J Keller-Olaman
Vicki Edwards
Susan J Elliott
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial & Behavioural Research Unit, Sunnybrook & Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(3):183-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cooking - methods
Female
Food Services
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Menu Planning
Middle Aged
Ontario
Taste
Abstract
Food banks mitigate immediate food insecurity, but their ability to promote healthy nutrition is constrained by how often recipients may visit and the range of foods available. In a descriptive study, a formative evaluation was completed of a combined heart-healthy recipe-tasting and education program that aims to promote healthy eating knowledge and skills in a group of food bank recipients in Hamilton, Ontario. Fifty-five adults were surveyed about food bank attendance, program awareness, perceived enhancement of knowledge and skills, and suggestions for program improvement. Most participants (73%) were positive about the program, and 91% wanted the program to continue. In addition, 78% would prepare the recipes sampled. In contrast, program awareness and planning food bank visits to coincide with the program were generally low. Food banks are potential sites for effective nutrition promotion programs. To reach more recipients, more frequent implementation and seeking the use of a designated room are suggested for the current program. The findings also suggest that the sampling approach to promoting healthy eating to food bank recipients deserves further study. For example, monitoring the selection of featured recipe ingredients would be a useful indicator of behaviour.
PubMed ID
16159412 View in PubMed
Less detail

24 records – page 1 of 3.