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212 records – page 1 of 22.

[Adverse effects after use of oral contraceptives. A comparison of 1966-70 and 1974-78]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40999
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jun 11;77(24):2249-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-1980
Author
G. Boman
L E Böttiger
B. Westerholm
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Jun 11;77(24):2249-52
Date
Jun-11-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Comparative Study
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
English Abstract
Estradiol Congeners - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Sweden
Thromboembolism - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Contraceptive preparations with a high content of estrogen (75 mcg or more) were prohibited in Sweden in 1974 whereupon the number of reported side effects of the pill markedly declined, both relatively and absolutely. The investigation, which compares the side effects reported during the period 1966-70 when the high dose preparation was on sale and 1974-78 after its prohibition. The decrease in the estrogen content took effect at that time. The risks remain, especially an excess morbidity from thromboembolism among women who use pills. While the risk increases with advancing age, the role played by the pill in the genesis of arterial complications is nonetheless slight. The risk of cardiac infarct among pill users who also smoke is not assessed in this material.
PubMed ID
7401778 View in PubMed
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[A serious discussion concerning p-pills is needed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207920
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Jul 9;94(28-29):2530
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-9-1997

Avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries. Exogenous hormones.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22270
Source
APMIS Suppl. 1997;76:132-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J F Winther
L. Dreyer
L. Tryggvadottir
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society.
Source
APMIS Suppl. 1997;76:132-40
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - adverse effects
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
The well-described influence of several aspects of reproductive life on the risk for cancer in the reproductive organs has raised concern regarding the safety of exogenous hormones, particularly since sex hormones have become one of the most widely used drugs among women in the western world. The major areas of application include oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy in women with menopausal symptoms. Since the introduction of oral contraceptives onto the Nordic market in the late 1960s, the number of users has grown steadily, to reach proportions of long-term users among women aged 15-45 years in 1985 ranging between 6% (Norway) and 19% (Sweden) and proportions of current users in 1994 ranging between 20% (Norway) and 28% (Sweden). Such data on the current and long-term use of oral contraceptives by the female populations, linked with relative estimates of adverse (cancers of the breast and uterine cervix) and beneficial effects (protection against cancers of the ovary and endometrium), indicate that 95 cases of breast cancer and 40 of cervical cancer will be caused by oral contraceptives annually around 2000 in the Nordic countries, which corresponds to 0.6% of all breast cancers and approximately 3% of all cervical cancers. The beneficial effects include an annual prevention around the year 2000 of approximately 350 cases of ovarian cancer and a similar number of endometrial cancer, for a total about 700 cancer cases annually. The prevalence of long-term users (> or = 5 years) of hormone replacement therapy among Nordic women aged 40-69 in 1995 was estimated to be 10-11%, which on the basis of an associated relative risk for breast cancer ranging from 1.2-1.5 suggests than an annual total of 260 cases of breast cancer could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if hormone replacement therapy were eliminated. This corresponds to 1.8% of all notified cases of breast cancer among women in these countries.
PubMed ID
9462825 View in PubMed
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Barriers to use of oral contraceptives in ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190760
Source
Contraception. 2002 Feb;65(2):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Lorna Sent
Sharon Fong
Jessica Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. ewiebe@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Contraception. 2002 Feb;65(2):159-63
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify barriers to the use of oral contraceptives by ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion. Using a qualitative descriptive study design, 40 ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion were recruited. Data were collected in semi-structured interviews by one interviewer who is fluent in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient themes. The attitudes toward oral contraceptives were mostly negative. The most common fears were about weight gain, permanent infertility, and being considered "bad" (promiscuous). These mostly negative attitudes toward oral contraceptives appear to be barriers to their use.
PubMed ID
11927119 View in PubMed
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Brain infarction in young adults (with particular reference to pathogenesis).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56083
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1977 Feb;55(2):145-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1977
Author
B. Hindfelt
O. Nilsson
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 1977 Feb;55(2):145-57
Date
Feb-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Coagulation Disorders - complications
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Craniocerebral Trauma - complications
Female
Heart Diseases - complications
Hematologic Diseases - complications
Humans
Infection - complications
Intracranial Embolism and Thrombosis - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Seasons
Sweden
Vascular Diseases - complications
Virus Diseases - complications
Abstract
Sixty-four young adults (aged 16 to 40 years) with ischemic stroke were analyzed in retrospect with regard to possible pathogenetic mechanisms. In older patients various predisposing factors emerge (arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia etc.) which are rare among younger age groups. In patients lacking predisposing causes the stroke incidence exhibits a seasonal variation. It is suggested that infection may be important for the development of ischemic stroke.
PubMed ID
842286 View in PubMed
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212 records – page 1 of 22.