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Acceptability of an eHealth Intervention to Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Among American Indian/Alaska Native Teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308304
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Jessica D Hanson
Tess L Weber
Umit Shrestha
Valerie J Bares
Michaela Seiber
Karen Ingersoll
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaskan Natives - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Contraception - psychology
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Pregnancy
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
A tribally led Changing High-Risk Alcohol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study (CHOICES) Program has successfully decreased the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEPs) among adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women by either reducing risky drinking or increasing contraception use. However, a community needs assessment revealed a need to implement a similar intervention with AI/AN teens. The goal of the project was to develop and establish the acceptability of CHOICES for AI/AN teens.
Key informant interviews were conducted to review the existing OST CHOICES intervention. After modifications to the existing program, focus groups with AI/AN teens were conducted to ensure validity and to finalize the OST CHAT (CHOICES for American Indian Teens) intervention.
Key informant (N = 15) participants suggested that a Web-based intervention may increase teen engagement by making the intervention more interactive and visually stimulating. Based on this formative research, CHAT was developed via Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Feedback on the online CHAT curriculum was given by focus groups comprised of AI/AN adolescents, and participants felt that this type of intervention would be both acceptable and able to implement with a community of reservation-based teens.
This study outlines the development of a Web-based intervention for an AEP intervention for AI/AN teens and will inform future prevention efforts. Implications include an expansion of the evidence-based CHOICES intervention for AI/AN teens and also development of a Web-based intervention for rural, reservation-based AI/AN communities.
PubMed ID
31693195 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive attitudes and contraceptive failure among women requesting induced abortion in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78817
Source
Hum Reprod. 2007 May;22(5):1320-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Rasch Vibeke
Knudsen L B
Gammeltoft T.
Christensen J T
Erenbjerg M.
Christensen J J Platz
Sorensen J B
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. v.rasch@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Hum Reprod. 2007 May;22(5):1320-6
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion Applicants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Contraception - psychology
Contraception Behavior
Contraception, Postcoital - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Unplanned
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To elucidate how contraceptive attitudes among Danish-born and immigrant women influence the request of induced abortion. METHODS: A case-control study, the case group comprising 1095 Danish-born women and 233 immigrant women requesting abortion, in comparison with a control group of 1295 pregnant women intending to give birth. The analysis used hospital-based questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: Lack of contraceptive knowledge and experience of contraceptive problems were associated with the choice of abortion. This association was most pronounced among immigrant women, where women lacking knowledge had a 6-fold increased odds ratio (OR) and women having experienced problems a 5-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Further, in this group of women, a partner's negative attitude towards contraception was associated with an 8-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Contraceptive failure was prevalent; 21% of the women who did not plan to become pregnant but intended to give birth had experienced contraceptive failure. The same applied, respectively, for 45% of the Danish-born women and 36% of immigrant women, who requested abortion. Women who had experienced contraceptive failure were significantly more likely to request abortion. CONCLUSIONS: Immigrant women seem to have more difficulties in using contraception than Danish-born women. To address this problem, there is a need for culturally sensitive information campaigns targeting this heterogonous group of women.
PubMed ID
17296620 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive practice and attitudes in Sweden 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64415
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 Nov;75(10):932-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
B J Oddens
I. Milsom
Author Affiliation
International Health Foundation, Brussels, Belgium.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1996 Nov;75(10):932-40
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception - psychology
Contraception Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate current contraceptive practice in Sweden and Swedish women's attitudes towards various contraceptive methods. METHODS: In 1994, a random sample of Swedish women (n = 2330), aged 15-45 years (stratified according to age and geographic distribution), were invited by telephone to participate in the study. Women (n = 1788) who accepted the invitation to participate were sent a postal questionnaire. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were returned by 1422 women (overall response rate: 61.0%). The sample was somewhat skewed towards higher educational level, but in other demographic respects no great deviations from the parent population were observed. The distribution of contraceptive methods in fertile, sexually active women who wished to avoid pregnancy was as follows: oral contraceptives (OCs) 33%, OC plus barrier method 5%, intrauterine device 21%, barrier methods 23%, sterilization 5% (female 3%; male 2%) and injectable steroids 2%. The overall pattern of contraceptive use in women aged 15-45 years had changed very little compared to results of a similar survey performed in 1987. However, the use of less effective methods (periodic abstinence, coitus interruptus and no method grouped together) was considerably lower among teenagers in 1994 (3%) than in 1987 (18%). The use of these traditional methods was still high in women aged over 35 years (15-17%). A large number of women considered medical methods of contraception to be reliable and easy to use but many were concerned about the safety for health of medical methods. CONCLUSIONS: Contraceptive practice changed towards more frequent use of medical, effective methods among young Swedish women, but not in the total female population. The latter was among others related to the relatively high use rates of less effective methods among women aged over 35. Women were concerned about the health safety of medical methods and relatively low percentages of women reported having received advice from health care professionals to use effective methods.
PubMed ID
9003096 View in PubMed
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Contraceptive use and associated factors among Swedish high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163101
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2007 Jun;12(2):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Margareta Larsson
Tanja Tydén
Ulf Hanson
Elisabet Häggström-Nordin
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. margareta.larsson@kbh.uu.se
Source
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2007 Jun;12(2):119-24
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Contraception - psychology - utilization
Contraception Behavior - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Students
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate self-reported sexual experiences, abortions, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), use of contraception and possible influencing factors on contraceptive use among Swedish high school students.
An anonymous classroom survey was distributed to a random sample (n = 924) of 18-year-old high school students in a medium-sized Swedish city. The response rate was 78% (n = 718).
Three out of four students had experienced intercourse and the majority of them stated that they were satisfied with their sexual life. Few students reported having had an abortion (5%) or a STI (4%). Alcohol use appeared the most important contributing risk factor for non-use of contraception in relation to both first and latest intercourse, and the young men reported more unprotected latest intercourse than the young women did.
The fact that young men appear less inclined to use contraception is disturbing, and must be addressed in sexual education and individual counseling to promote a better sexual health for adolescents.
PubMed ID
17559009 View in PubMed
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Disease knowledge and reproductive attitudes of parents having a child with cystic fibrosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219361
Source
Ann Genet. 1994;37(2):89-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. de Braekeleer
F. Murray
J. Daigneault
C. Allard
F. Simard
G. Aubin
Author Affiliation
Institut National d'Etudes Démographiques, Paris, France.
Source
Ann Genet. 1994;37(2):89-92
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child
Contraception - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cystic Fibrosis - epidemiology - genetics - prevention & control - psychology
Family Health
Family Planning Services
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ), a geographically isolated region located in northeastern Quebec, has an incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF) of 1 in 902 live births and a carrier rate of 1 in 15 inhabitants. Forty two families among those registered at the local chapters of the Canadian CF Foundation were randomly selected. A multiple-choice questionnaire was applied during an interview. It included 102 questions pertaining to the sociodemographic status of the participants, their knowledge of the disease and their reproductive attitudes. All the educational and socioeconomic levels were represented in the sample; 76% of the respondents were married. Before answering the questionnaire, 86% estimated their knowledge of the transmission of CF to be good or excellent; in fact, the rate of good answers to various questions ranged from 71 to 95%. The birth of a child with CF had a major impact on further pregnancy planning (a 69% reduction or arrest). Seventy one percent of the respondents used a more effective contraception method (including vasectomy and tubal ligation) after the birth of the CF child; in 63% of them, the decision was a direct consequence of the presence of the disease in the family. Thirty four respondents (81%) knew that prenatal diagnosis was available; 90% were in favor of such a prenatal test but only 17% would have required an abortion should the fetus be affected.
PubMed ID
7985985 View in PubMed
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Ethnic Chinese women's perceptions about condoms, withdrawal and rhythm methods of birth control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179995
Source
Contraception. 2004 Jun;69(6):493-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Ellen R Wiebe
Patricia A Janssen
Angela Henderson
Iris Fung
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, 1013-750 West Broadway, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1H9 Canada. ewiebe@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Contraception. 2004 Jun;69(6):493-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Contraception - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Abstract
To gain a better understanding of ethnic Chinese women's perceptions and experiences of using barrier and rhythm methods of contraception in order to improve contraceptive counseling at abortion clinics.
Qualitative descriptive study.
Urban abortion clinic.
Forty ethnic Chinese women presenting for abortion.
Data were collected in semi-structured interviews by one interviewer who is fluent in English, Mandarin and Cantonese. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient themes.
All of the women interviewed had used condoms (none with spermicide), 20 had used rhythm and 17 withdrawal, usually a combination of two or three of these methods. Many women noted that these methods are under male control and talked about the difficulty negotiating their use with partners. The majority of women using rhythm were unable to correctly identify "safe periods."
PubMed ID
15157795 View in PubMed
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Family planning in Russia: experience and attitudes of gynecologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221013
Source
Adv Contracept. 1993 Jun;9(2):93-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
A P Visser
N. Bruyniks
L. Remennick
Author Affiliation
International Health Foundation, Brussels, Belgium.
Source
Adv Contracept. 1993 Jun;9(2):93-104
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Communication
Contraception - psychology
Contraceptives, Oral
Counseling
Family Planning Services - economics
Female
Gynecology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician-Patient Relations
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Russia
Abstract
A survey was made of 375 Russian gynecologists. The questionnaire on family planning and contraceptives was distributed at the beginning of three local educational symposia. Almost all participants filled in the questionnaire on attitudes, knowledge and experience with family planning. The sample consisted of departmental specialists and heads of departments/clinics, working mainly at in- or out-patient women's health clinics. The mean age was 37 years; 83% were women, living in medium-sized or large cities (80%). Half of them had been working as a gynecologist for more than 10 years. Only 55% had been trained in family planning. The main reasons mentioned for the high abortion rate in Russia were the lack of education, non-involvement of male partner, and lack of modern contraceptives. Most of the gynecologists were in favor of special family planning clinics with special attention to services for the users. About half of the physicians knew how the pill works and estimated that 41% of women know that the pill contains estrogens. Sixty-two percent found that patients are badly informed about available contraception. Main sources of information on contraception were journals/books, colleagues and mass media. The majority reported having a directive style of patient counseling, and stated that parents should be informed of their teenagers' sexual experiences. The more experienced physicians with a training in family planning were better informed on contraception and showed a more patient-concerned attitude. It is concluded that health care providers should be the main target group of training and education in family planning, and need the support of Western European family planning organizations.
PubMed ID
8237572 View in PubMed
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The first abortion - and the last? A study of the personality factors underlying repeated failure of contraception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244477
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1981 Jun;19(3):193-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1981
Author
P. Niemelä
P. Lehtinen
L. Rauramo
R. Hermansson
R. Karjalainen
H. Mäki
C A Storå
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1981 Jun;19(3):193-200
Date
Jun-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Adult
Contraception - psychology
Contraception Behavior
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland
Humans
Marriage
Personality
Pregnancy
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The causes leading to a second abortion were outlined in a psychological study comparing 30 women expecting a second abortion with 29 women who had successfully prevented conception after a first abortion. It was found that both groups improved their contraceptive practices after the first abortion. However, while the latter group continued with their improved practices, the former group went back to the earlier inefficient or non-existent contraceptive behavior. The inability to improve contraception in the long run was not related to differences in educational level or knowledge about contraceptive techniques but to the developmental level of personality structures. The women expecting their second abortion rated lower in control of impulsivity, emotional balance, realism, self-esteem and stability of life as well as capacity for more integrated personal relationships. The differences in personality development and consequently in the capacity for long-term contraception were found to be due to growth conditions in childhood.
PubMed ID
6120865 View in PubMed
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Increased number of induced abortions in Norway after media coverage of adverse vascular events from the use of third-generation oral contraceptives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210279
Source
Contraception. 1997 Jan;55(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
F E Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Contraception. 1997 Jan;55(1):11-4
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Contraception - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Contraceptives, Oral, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - economics
Desogestrel - administration & dosage - adverse effects - economics
Female
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Single Person - statistics & numerical data
Students - statistics & numerical data
Thrombophlebitis - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
After the press release in Lancet (October 18, 1995) of increased risks for adverse vascular events in users of pills containing desogestrel and gestodene the total sales of oral contraceptives dropped over a two-month period by 17%, while sales of the only desogestrel brand available (Marvelon) dropped by over 70% in Norway. From sales, we can estimate that more than 45,000 women either changed from Marvelon to a second or first-generation brand or stopped using OCs. In total, more than 25,000 women discontinued OC use in Norway during November and December of 1995. Abortion data from one Norwegian county, representing 6-7% of the Norwegian population, show no statistically significant changes in the total number of induced abortions from the first quarter of 1996 as compared with that of the first quarter in preceding years. However, abortion rates that had been steadily decreasing from 1992 through 1995 in women 24 years old or younger, were promptly interrupted by a significant 36% increase during the first quarter of 1996. Most of the additional cases were found among single, childless students. The observed increased abortion rate among younger women is most probably linked to changes in contraceptive use during the pill scare of the late October through December of 1995, during which time these women conceived.
Notes
Comment In: Contraception. 1997 Jul;56(1):55-89306032
PubMed ID
9013055 View in PubMed
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Induced abortion. Decision and need for medical information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65525
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Nov;4(4):225-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1986
Author
F E Skjeldestad
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1986 Nov;4(4):225-30
Date
Nov-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced - psychology
Adolescent
Adult
Consumer Participation
Contraception - psychology
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Marriage
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Role
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This study gives attention to the preabortion encounter: to what extent medical information was provided and to what extent professional health workers took part in the decision-making process concerning abortion. During the first half year of 1983, 405 women demanding abortion at the Gynecological Department, University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway were interviewed. Ninety-five per cent of the women had a preabortion visit at a physician's office. Nearly 44% of the women were informed about the surgical procedure, while only 26% of the women were informed about the possible medical risks. Upon arrival at the hospital to have the abortion carried out 53% of the women wanted information about the surgical procedures, while 72% wanted information about possible medical complications related to the intervention. Fifty-six per cent of the women decided on abortion themselves. Seventy-six per cent (304/405) of the women had discussed termination of the pregnancy with their partners. Of these women 54% (164/304) decided on abortion together with their partners. Married women and cohabitants decided more often together with their partners than women living alone did (p less than 0.01). Only seven per cent of the women who had a preabortion visit discussed the abortion decision with their physician, while less than one per cent of the women decided on abortion during consultation with their physician. At the time of conception over 70% of the women were not using any contraceptives. Among those women who became pregnant as a result of contraceptive failure, significantly more women were either married or cohabitants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3797884 View in PubMed
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21 records – page 1 of 3.