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186 records – page 1 of 19.

Acute care in a geriatric facility: five years at Baycrest Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221915
Source
J Long Term Care Adm. 1993-1994 Winter;21(4):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Gordon
M. Cheung
S. Wiesenthal
Author Affiliation
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto.
Source
J Long Term Care Adm. 1993-1994 Winter;21(4):30-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - nursing - therapy
Aged
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospitals, Public - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Nursing
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Progressive Patient Care - organization & administration
Abstract
Although most long-term care facilities cannot always evaluate and treat their residents during acute, intercurrent illnesses, it is possible to design systems that allow for effective care without transfer.
PubMed ID
10132996 View in PubMed
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Adult Day Care centres in British Columbia: models, characteristics and services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222238
Source
Health Rep. 1993;5(2):189-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
G M Gutman
S. Milstein
J. Killam
D. Lewis
M J Hollander
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, Simon Fraser University.
Source
Health Rep. 1993;5(2):189-207
Date
1993
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Day Care - classification - organization & administration
Great Britain
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Leisure Activities
Models, organizational
Organizational Affiliation
Organizational Objectives
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration
Social Work - organization & administration
United States
Abstract
Adult Day Care (ADC) is increasingly being recognized as an important sub-system of the continuing care system. This paper reviews models developed in the United States and Britain and compares them, and the services they offer, with centres in British Columbia, Canada. Data on British Columbia are from a study in which all 49 centres in the province provided detailed information about their staffing, operating characteristics, activities and services. The study found B.C. compared favourably in providing services needed by ADC clients. Key differences between the B.C. centres and those in the U.S. and U.K. were: a larger proportion of B.C. centres were not affiliated with any other organization; B.C. centres admitted a range of clients and were less likely to cater exclusively to special needs groups; and, B.C. centres were more likely than centres in the U.S. to provide a number of services such as: dental care, transportation, bathing and physiotherapy.
PubMed ID
8292758 View in PubMed
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Aftercare, emergency department visits, and readmission in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126698
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;51(3):283-293.e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Corine E Carlisle
Muhammad Mamdani
Russell Schachar
Teresa To
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. corine.carlisle@sickkids.ca
Source
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;51(3):283-293.e4
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aftercare - methods - psychology - standards
Canada
Confidence Intervals
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Discharge - standards
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Young Adult
Abstract
U.S. and Canadian data demonstrate decreasing inpatient days, increasing nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits, and short supply of child psychiatrists. Our study aims to determine whether aftercare reduces ED visits and/or readmission in adolescents with first psychiatric hospitalization.
We conducted a population-based cohort analysis using linked health administrative databases with accrual from April 1, 2002, to March 1, 2004. The study cohort included all 15- to 19-year-old adolescents with first psychiatric admission. Adolescents with and without aftercare in the month post-discharge were matched on their propensity to receive aftercare. Our primary outcome was time to first psychiatric ED visit or readmission. Secondary outcomes were time to first psychiatric ED visit and readmission, separately.
We identified 4,472 adolescents with first-time psychiatric admission. Of these, 57% had aftercare in the month post-discharge. Propensity-score-based matching, which accounted for each individual's propensity for aftercare, produced a cohort of 3,004 adolescents. In matched analyses, relative to those with no aftercare in the month post-discharge, those with aftercare had increased likelihood of combined outcome (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.42), and readmission (HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.14-1.66), but not ED visits (HR = 1.14, 95% CI = 0.95-1.37).
Our results are provocative: we found that aftercare in the month post-discharge increased the likelihood of readmission but not ED visit. Over and above confounding by severity and Canadian/U.S. systems differences, our results may indicate a relative lack of psychiatric services for youth. Our results point to the need for improved data capture of pediatric mental health service use.
PubMed ID
22365464 View in PubMed
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The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146165
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Robyn Blackadar
Mishaela Houle
Author Affiliation
Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:85-90
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Benchmarking - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Coronary Artery Bypass
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Plan Implementation
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Heart Diseases - therapy
Humans
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.
PubMed ID
20057256 View in PubMed
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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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An agenda for occupational therapy's contribution to collaborative chronic disease research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133487
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Carri L Hand
Lori J Letts
Claudia M von Zweck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, 1400 Main St. W. Hamilton, ON, L8S 1C7. handc@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2011 Jun;78(3):147-55
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Chronic Disease - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Occupational Therapy - organization & administration
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Abstract
To meet the needs of adults with chronic diseases, Canadian health care is moving toward more interdisciplinary, collaborative practice. There is limited high-quality evidence to support practice in this area. Occupational therapists can play a significant role in this area of practice and research.
To develop an agenda of priority areas within collaborative chronic disease research to which occupational therapy can make a contribution.
The project involved literature and Internet review, a consensus meeting with a range of stakeholders, a survey of occupational therapists, and synthesis of findings to create a research agenda.
An interdisciplinary and intersectoral group of stakeholders identified seven main priority areas. One priority is specific to occupational therapy while the remaining six cross disciplines.
The research agenda can support funding applications and encourage interdisciplinary research collaboration to ultimately produce research evidence that can benefit people with chronic diseases.
PubMed ID
21699008 View in PubMed
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[Analysis and management of comorbidity among the elderly must be coordinated. Treatment can be evaluated with the DBU method implemented at community centers for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175189
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Mar 7-13;102(10):758-9, 762-3, 765
Publication Type
Article

Assessing the educational needs of Canadian gastroenterologists and gastroenterology nurses: challenges to optimal care in Crohn's Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146668
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Dec;23(12):805-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Martin Dupuis
John K Marshall
Sean M Hayes
Kayla Cytryn
Suzanne Murray
Author Affiliation
AXDEV Group Inc, Brossard, Quebec J4W 3H2, Canada. dupuism@axdevgroup.com
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2009 Dec;23(12):805-10
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada
Communication
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - therapy
Data Collection
Disease Progression
Female
Gastroenterology - education - organization & administration - standards
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Patient compliance
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Young Adult
Abstract
A national needs assessment of Canadian gastroenterologists and gastroenterology nurses was undertaken to determine the perceived and unperceived educational and performance barriers to caring for patients with Crohn's disease (CD).
A triangulated, mixed-method approach (qualitative and quantitative) was used to determine the nature and extent of knowledge gaps and barriers in the care of patients with CD.
Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine gastroenterologists, four gastroenterology nurses and nine patients with CD. Based on this exploratory research, a survey was designed and launched nationally (37 gastroenterologists, 36 gastroenterology nurses). Findings indicated that Canadian gastroenterologists and gastroenterology nurses lacked clarity regarding their roles and responsibilities across the continuum of CD care, and face communication gaps within the health care team, undermining their effectiveness. Gastroenterologists identified challenges in optimal diagnosis due to unclear testing and diagnostic criteria. They recognized knowledge gaps when treating patient subgroups and in prescribing biological therapies. Furthermore, gastroenterologists self-identified gaps in skill, knowledge, and confidence in monitoring disease progression and effectively assessing response to therapy. When managing patients with CD, gastroenterologists expressed challenges with patient issues outside their domain of medical expertise, particularly with the skills needed to facilitate effective patient communication and education that would enhance adherence to recommended treatments.
Educational initiatives should address diagnostic and treatment guidelines, as well as enhancement of clinical performance gaps in health care team processes and the patient-professional therapeutic relationship. To impact care and patient outcomes, these initiatives must be relevant to clinical practice settings and applicable to the practice context.
Notes
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Apr;98(4):844-912738466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jan;101(1):110-816405542
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jul;101(7):1559-6816863561
Cites: Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2009 Mar;15(3):429-3518942744
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Mar;27 Suppl 1:1-818307643
Cites: Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008 May;14(5):709-2018095316
Cites: Gastroenterology. 2007 Sep;133(3):769-7917628557
PubMed ID
20011732 View in PubMed
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186 records – page 1 of 19.