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883 records – page 1 of 89.

[The principle of continuous health care. An example in Heinola City Hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220174
Source
Katilolehti. 1993 Oct;98(5):9-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
E. Montonen
Source
Katilolehti. 1993 Oct;98(5):9-10
Date
Oct-1993
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Finland
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Patient transfer
PubMed ID
8277671 View in PubMed
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Seamless care-safe care. The challenges of interoperability and patient safety in health care. Proceedings of the Tenth European Federation Medical Informatics Special Topic Conference. June 2-4, 2010. Reykjavik, Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140908
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2010;155:3-226
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2010;155:3-226
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Medical Informatics Applications
Safety Management
PubMed ID
20830815 View in PubMed
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Optimizing medication safety at care transitions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128826
Source
Alta RN. 2011 Sep-Oct;67(5):25
Publication Type
Article
Source
Alta RN. 2011 Sep-Oct;67(5):25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Medication Reconciliation
Nurse's Role
PubMed ID
22165795 View in PubMed
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[Wards' home visits quiets patients' anxiety].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225663
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Sep 26;15(16):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-1991
Author
J. Thomasson
Source
Vardfacket. 1991 Sep 26;15(16):8-9
Date
Sep-26-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
House Calls
Humans
Patient Discharge
Rehabilitation
Sweden
PubMed ID
1812670 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Infirm Can. 1985 Mar;27(3):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1985
Author
S. Théoret
E. Perreault
Source
Infirm Can. 1985 Mar;27(3):30-1
Date
Mar-1985
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Primary Health Care
Primary Nursing
Quebec
PubMed ID
3844377 View in PubMed
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[Patient-doctor continuity in primary care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247489
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Feb 14;76(7):507-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-1979
Author
G. Ejertsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Feb 14;76(7):507-9
Date
Feb-14-1979
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Primary Health Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
763026 View in PubMed
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[Midwifery practice in Sweden. Continued care supported by active participation by midwives. Discussion]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65631
Source
Josanpu Zasshi. 1984 Oct;38(10):874-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Author
M. Kroffer
K. Miyazato
F. Inaoka
Source
Josanpu Zasshi. 1984 Oct;38(10):874-80
Date
Oct-1984
Language
Japanese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Female
Humans
Midwifery
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
6568305 View in PubMed
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The family care coordinator: paving the way to seamless care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141539
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;28(2):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mary Jean Howitt
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Center, Halifax, NS, Canada. MaryJean.Howitt@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
J Pediatr Oncol Nurs. 2011 Mar-Apr;28(2):107-13
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Hematologic Diseases - therapy
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Nova Scotia
Abstract
The care of a child/adolescent with cancer or a blood disorder is complex and often long term, involving many interdisciplinary team members across services and geographical boundaries. This experience can be overwhelming for patients and their families, highlighting the need for a family care coordinator (FCC) to help them navigate their care path. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the concept of family care coordination as experienced by the IWK Health Center in Nova Scotia, Canada, with the intent of sharing a valuable model of care with other pediatric hematology/oncology services. Key components of the role are ongoing assessment, education, partnerships, communication, support, and advocacy. Essential resources and pathways are required to implement the role and optimize patient/family outcomes, facilitating consistent and accessible care, enhancing quality and safety, building trust, and gleaning efficiencies. Inherent FCC challenges are identified as time constraints, replacement issues, maintaining professional boundaries, and emotional burnout. A FCC can enable seamless, individualized care for children/adolescents and their families with pediatric oncological and hematological disorders, optimizing the outcomes for all involved.
PubMed ID
20709997 View in PubMed
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[Patient-centered care: integrated patient follow-up].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118179
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Nov-Dec;9(6):20
Publication Type
Article
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Nov-Dec;9(6):20
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Continuity of Patient Care
Home Care Services
Humans
Patient-Centered Care
PubMed ID
23234222 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and continuity in discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134562
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jan;21(1-2):21-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Eva Carlsson
Margareta Ehnfors
Ann Catrine Eldh
Anna Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. eva.carlsson2@orebroll.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jan;21(1-2):21-31
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Continuity of Patient Care
Eating Disorders - etiology
Humans
Patient Discharge
Stroke - complications
Sweden
Abstract
To describe the accuracy and continuity of discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke.
Eating difficulties are prevalent and serious problems in patients with stroke. Screening for eating difficulties can predict undernutrition and subsequent care needs. For optimal care, information transferred between care settings has to be comprehensive and accurate.
Prospective, descriptive.
The study investigated a sample of 15 triads, each including one patient with stroke along with his patient record and discharge summary and two nursing staff in the municipal care to whom the patient was discharged. Data were collected by observations of patients' eating, record audits and interviews with nurses. Data were analysed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.
Accuracy of recorded information on patients' eating difficulties and informational continuity were poor, as was accuracy in the transferred information according to nursing staff's perceptions. All patients were at risk of undernutrition and in too poor a state to receive rehabilitation. Nevertheless, patients' eating difficulties were described in a vague and unspecific language in the patient records. Co-ordinated care planning and management continuity related to eating difficulties were largely lacking in the documentation. Despite their important role in caring for patients with eating difficulties, little information on eating difficulties seemed to reach licensed practical nurses in the municipalities.
Comprehensiveness in the documentation of eating difficulties and accuracy of transferred information were poor based on record audits and as perceived by the municipal nursing staff. Although all patients were at risk of undernutrition, had multiple eating difficulties and were in too poor a state for rehabilitation, explicit care plans for nutritional problems were lacking.
Lack of accuracy and continuity in discharge information on eating difficulties may increase risk of undernutrition and related complications for patients in continuous stroke care. Therefore, the discharge process must be based on comprehensive and accurate documentation.
PubMed ID
21564355 View in PubMed
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883 records – page 1 of 89.