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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
Documents
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Adult obesity prevalence in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134392
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Margot Shields
Margaret D Carroll
Cynthia L Ogden
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Health Analysis Division.
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity is a public health challenge throughout the world. Ongoing monitoring of trends in obesity is important to assess interventions aimed at preventing or reducing the burden of obesity. Since the 1960s, measured height and weight have been collected in the United States as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In Canada, data on measured height and weight have been collected from nationally representative samples of the population less regularly. This changed in 2007 with the launch of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), the scope and purpose of which are similar to those of NHANES. The objective of this report is to compare estimates of the prevalence of obesity between Canadian and American adults.
PubMed ID
21592419 View in PubMed
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Aging and health: an examination of differences between older Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100475
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):369-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Kathi Wilson
Mark W Rosenberg
Sylvia Abonyi
Robert Lovelace
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto Mississauga, ON. kathi.wilson@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2010 Sep;29(3):369-82
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Alcoholism - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - ethnology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Expectancy - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - ethnology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - ethnology
Abstract
The Aboriginal population in Canada, much younger than the general population, has experienced a trend towards aging over the past decade. Using data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), this article examines differences in health status and the determinants of health and health care use between the 55-and-older Aboriginal population and non-Aboriginal population. The results show that the older Aboriginal population is unhealthier than the non-Aboriginal population across all age groups; differences in health status, however, appear to converge as age increases. Among those aged 55 to 64, 7 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions compared with 2 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population. Yet, among those aged 75 and older, 51 per cent of the Aboriginal population report three or more chronic conditions in comparison with 23 per cent of the non-Aboriginal population.
PubMed ID
20731890 View in PubMed
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America's Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286886
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Carolyn A Liebler
Sonya R Porter
Leticia E Fernandez
James M Noon
Sharon R Ennis
Source
Demography. 2017 Feb;54(1):259-284
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Censuses
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
A person's racial or ethnic self-identification can change over time and across contexts, which is a component of population change not usually considered in studies that use race and ethnicity as variables. To facilitate incorporation of this aspect of population change, we show patterns and directions of individual-level race and Hispanic response change throughout the United States and among all federally recognized race/ethnic groups. We use internal U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses in which responses have been linked at the individual level (N = 162 million). Approximately 9.8 million people (6.1 %) in our data have a different race and/or Hispanic-origin response in 2010 than they did in 2000. Race response change was especially common among those reported as American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, in a multiple-race response group, or Hispanic. People reported as non-Hispanic white, black, or Asian in 2000 usually had the same response in 2010 (3 %, 6 %, and 9 % of responses changed, respectively). Hispanic/non-Hispanic ethnicity responses were also usually consistent (13 % and 1 %, respectively, changed). We found a variety of response change patterns, which we detail. In many race/Hispanic response groups, we see population churn in the form of large countervailing flows of response changes that are hidden in cross-sectional data. We find that response changes happen across ages, sexes, regions, and response modes, with interesting variation across racial/ethnic categories. Researchers should address the implications of race and Hispanic-origin response change when designing analyses and interpreting results.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28105578 View in PubMed
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The association between length of stay in Canada and intimate partner violence among immigrant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170482
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Apr;96(4):654-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Ilene Hyman
Tonia Forte
Janice Du Mont
Sarah Romans
Marsha M Cohen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Women's Health, 790 Bay St, 7th Fl, Toronto, ON, Canada. ilene.hyman@sw.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Apr;96(4):654-9
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Spouse Abuse - ethnology
Abstract
We examined the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among recent (0-9 years) and nonrecent (>/= 10 years) immigrant women in Canada to determine whether differences in IPV were associated with length of stay in Canada.
We analyzed data from the 1999 General Social Survey, a national cross-sectional telephone survey. We used weighted logistic regression analysis to examine the effect of length of stay in Canada on IPV and controlled for socio-cultural and other factors associated with IPV.
The crude prevalence of IPV was similar among recent and nonrecent immigrant women. However, after adjustment, the risk for IPV was significantly lower among recent immigrant women compared with nonrecent immigrant women. Country of origin, age, marital status, and having an activity limitation (physical/mental disability or health problem) also were associated with a higher risk for IPV.
Our findings have important implications for both prevention and detection of IPV among immigrant women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16507740 View in PubMed
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The association between race/ethnicity and the effectiveness of direct antiviral agents for hepatitis C virus infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284948
Source
Hepatology. 2017 Feb;65(2):426-438
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Feng Su
Pamela K Green
Kristin Berry
George N Ioannou
Source
Hepatology. 2017 Feb;65(2):426-438
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual
Drug Therapy, Combination
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hepacivirus - drug effects - genetics
Hepatitis C - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology - mortality
Hepatitis C, Chronic - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Hispanic Americans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interferon-alpha - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Risk assessment
Simeprevir - therapeutic use
Sofosbuvir - therapeutic use
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with lower rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) to interferon-based treatments for chronic hepatitis C virus infection, whereas Asian race was associated with higher SVR rates compared to white patients. We aimed to describe the association between race/ethnicity and effectiveness of new direct-acting antiviral regimens in the Veterans Affairs health care system nationally. We identified 21,095 hepatitis C virus-infected patients (11,029 [52%] white, 6,171 [29%] black, 1,187 [6%] Hispanic, 348 [2%] Asian/Pacific Islander/American Indian/Alaska Native, and 2,360 [11%] declined/missing race or ethnicity) who initiated antiviral treatment with regimens containing sofosbuvir, simeprevir + sofosbuvir, ledipasvir/sofosbuvir, or paritaprevir/ombitasvir/ritonavir/dasabuvir during the 18-month period from January 1, 2014, to June 30, 2015. Overall SVR rates were 89.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 89.2-90.4) in white, 89.8% (95% CI 89.0-90.6) in black, 86.0% (95% CI 83.7-88.0) in Hispanic, and 90.7% (95% CI 87.0-93.5) in Asian/Pacific Islander/American Indian/Alaska Native patients. However, after adjustment for baseline characteristics, black (adjusted odds ratio = 0.77, P
PubMed ID
27775854 View in PubMed
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Blindness registrations and socioeconomic factors in Canada: an ecologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178364
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004 Jul;11(3):199-211
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Arthur J Sit
Mary Chipman
Graham E Trope
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004 Jul;11(3):199-211
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blindness - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ecology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate the socioeconomic factors associated with blindness registration in Canada and its regions using an ecologic approach.
Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) blindness registration data for 1996 were divided into units of analysis using postal codes and correlated with demographic and socioeconomic information collected by the 1996 Census of Canada. A total of 1250 units were analyzed representing 28,429,519 persons (98.55% of the population of Canada). Six socioeconomic factors were examined using weighted linear multivariate regression analysis: I) Percentage of the population aged 65 years and over; 2) Median household income; 3) Percentage of the population with university education; 4) Percentage of income derived from government transfer payments; 5) Recent immigrants; and 6) Visible minorities (blacks, Chinese, South Asians). Regression models were created for Canada as well as five geographic regions within Canada.
For Canada as a whole, blindness registration prevalence was positively correlated with age distribution and percentage of recent immigrants, and negatively correlated with level of government assistance income and percentage ethnic Chinese population. For five regional regression models, the common predictor variables were age distribution, median household income and percentage of the population who are black. None of the regional models produced an identical set of correlations.
Socioeconomic factors associated with blindness registration prevalence varied across different regions. Median household income was the second most common factor after age distribution, suggesting that areas with lower incomes tend to utilize more blind services. Higher blindness registration rates were associated with areas that had a higher percentage of the population who were black. Differences in blindness registration rates may reflect under-utilization of blind services and/or variations in disease and treatment rates in different populations.
PubMed ID
15370552 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer incidence among American Indian and Alaska Native women: US, 1999-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92369
Source
Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1191-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2008
Author
Wingo Phyllis A
King Jessica
Swan Judith
Coughlin Steven S
Kaur Judith S
Erb-Alvarez Julie A
Jackson-Thompson Jeannette
Arambula Solomon Teshia G
Author Affiliation
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA.
Source
Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1191-202
Date
Sep-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - ethnology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Population Surveillance
Registries
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women. Although published studies have suggested that breast cancer rates among AI/AN women are lower than those among other racial and ethnic populations, accurate determinations of the breast cancer burden have been hampered by misclassification of AI/AN race. METHODS: Cancer incidence data from the National Program of Cancer Registries and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program were combined to estimate age-adjusted rates for the diagnosis years 1999 through 2004. Several steps were taken to reduce the misclassification of AI/AN race: linking cases to Indian Health Service (IHS) patient services database, restricting analyses to Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties, and stratifying results by IHS region. RESULTS: Breast cancer incidence rates among AI/AN women varied nearly 3-fold across IHS regions. The highest rates were in Alaska (134.8) and the Plains (Northern, 115.9; Southern, 115.7), and the lowest rates were in the Southwest (50.8). The rate in Alaska was similar to the rate among non-Hispanic white (NHW) women in Alaska. Overall, AI/AN women had lower rates of breast cancer than NHW women, but AI/AN women were more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage disease. CONCLUSIONS: To the authors' knowledge, this report provides the most comprehensive breast cancer incidence data for AI/AN women to date. The wide regional variation indicates an important need for etiologic and health services research, and the large percentage of AI/AN women with late-stage disease demands innovative approaches for increasing access to screening.
PubMed ID
18720389 View in PubMed
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Burden of tuberculosis in indigenous peoples globally: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112522
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Sep;17(9):1139-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
D. Tollefson
E. Bloss
A. Fanning
J T Redd
K. Barker
E. McCray
Author Affiliation
Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Sep;17(9):1139-50
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - methods
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening
Prevalence
Prognosis
Residence Characteristics
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - ethnology - prevention & control
World Health
Abstract
The burden of tuberculosis (TB) in the estimated 370 million indigenous peoples worldwide is unknown.
To conduct a literature review to summarize the TB burden in indigenous peoples, identify gaps in current knowledge, and provide the foundation for a research agenda prioritizing indigenous health within TB control.
A systematic literature review identified articles published between January 1990 and November 2011 quantifying TB disease burden in indigenous populations worldwide.
Among the 91 articles from 19 countries included in the review, only 56 were from outside Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. The majority of the studies showed higher TB rates among indigenous groups than non-indigenous groups. Studies from the Amazon generally reported the highest TB prevalence and incidence, but select populations from South-East Asia and Africa were found to have similarly high rates of TB. In North America, the Inuit had the highest reported TB incidence (156/100000), whereas the Metis of Canada and American Indians/Alaska Natives experienced rates of
PubMed ID
23823137 View in PubMed
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Cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1999-2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92380
Source
Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2008
Author
Wiggins Charles L
Espey David K
Wingo Phyllis A
Kaur Judith S
Wilson Robin Taylor
Swan Judith
Miller Barry A
Jim Melissa A
Kelly Janet J
Lanier Anne P
Author Affiliation
New Mexico Tumor Registry, University of New Mexico Cancer Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001, USA. cwiggins@salud.unm.edu
Source
Cancer. 2008 Sep 1;113(5 Suppl):1142-52
Date
Sep-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - ethnology
Registries
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cancer incidence rates vary among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations and often differ from rates among non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). However, the misclassification of race for AI/AN cancer cases in central cancer registries may have led to underestimates of the AI/AN cancer burden in previous reports. METHODS: Cases diagnosed during 1999 through 2004 were identified from population-based cancer registries in the United States. Age-adjusted rates were calculated for the 25 most common sites for AI/ANs and NHWs. To minimize the misclassification of race, cancer registry records were linked with patient registration files from the Indian Health Service (IHS). Analyses were restricted to Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties and were stratified by IHS region. RESULTS: In CHSDA counties, cancer incidence rates among AI/ANs varied widely by region, whereas rates among NHWs did not. For all cancer sites combined, AI/AN rates were higher than NHW rates among both males and females in the Northern and Southern Plains, and among Alaska Native Females; AI/AN rates were lower than NHW rates in the Southwest, the Pacific Coast, and the East. Lung cancer and colorectal cancer rates for AI/ANs exceeded rates for NHWs in Alaska and the Northern Plains. Rates for stomach, gallbladder, kidney, and liver cancer were higher among AI/ANs than among NHWs overall, in Alaska, in the Plains regions, and in the Southwest. CONCLUSIONS: Regional differences in cancer incidence rates among AI/AN populations were not obvious from nationwide data and highlighted opportunities for cancer control and prevention. It is unlikely that such differences are explained by race misclassification.
PubMed ID
18720375 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.