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The 1000 Canadian faces of lupus: determinants of disease outcome in a large multiethnic cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151515
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Christine A Peschken
Steven J Katz
Earl Silverman
Janet E Pope
Paul R Fortin
Christian Pineau
C Douglas Smith
Hector O Arbillaga
Dafna D Gladman
Murray Urowitz
Michel Zummer
Ann Clarke
Sasha Bernatsky
Marie Hudson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba Arthritis Center, RR149-800 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1M4, Canada. cpeschken@exchange.hsc.mb.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Jun;36(6):1200-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups
Female
Health status
Humans
Income
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - economics - ethnology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Social Class
Abstract
To describe disease expression and damage accrual in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and determine the influence of ethnicity and socioeconomic factors on damage accrual in a large multiethnic Canadian cohort.
Adults with SLE were enrolled in a multicenter cohort. Data on sociodemographic factors, diagnostic criteria, disease activity, autoantibodies, treatment, and damage were collected using standardized tools, and results were compared across ethnic groups. We analyzed baseline data, testing for differences in sociodemographic and clinical factors, between the different ethnic groups, in univariate analyses; significant variables from univariate analyses were included in multivariate regression models examining for differences between ethnic groups, related to damage scores.
We studied 1416 patients, including 826 Caucasians, 249 Asians, 122 Afro-Caribbeans, and 73 Aboriginals. Although the overall number of American College of Rheumatology criteria in different ethnic groups was similar, there were differences in individual manifestations and autoantibody profiles. Asian and Afro-Caribbean patients had more frequent renal involvement and more exposure to immunosuppressives. Aboriginal patients had high frequencies of antiphospholipid antibodies and high rates of comorbidity, but disease manifestations similar to Caucasians. Asian patients had the youngest age at onset and the lowest damage scores. Aboriginals had the least education and lowest incomes. The final regression model (R2=0.27) for higher damage score included older age, longer disease duration, low income, prednisone treatment, higher disease activity, and cyclophosphamide treatment.
There are differences in lupus phenotypes between ethnic populations. Although ethnicity was not found to be a significant independent predictor of damage accrual, low income was.
PubMed ID
19369456 View in PubMed
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Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Dec-30-2017
Author
Jon Røyne Kyllingstad
Author Affiliation
Norsk Teknisk Museum/The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology, Oslo, Norway, jon.kyllingstad@tekniskmuseum.no.
Source
J Anthropol Sci. 2017 Dec 30; 95:319-327
Date
Dec-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Anthropology
Continental Population Groups - ethnology - history
Emigration and Immigration
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Minority Groups
Norway - ethnology
Racism - ethnology - history
Science
PubMed ID
28708062 View in PubMed
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Abusive head trauma among children in Alaska: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107670
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Jared Parrish
Cathy Baldwin-Johnson
Margaret Volz
Yvonne Goldsmith
Author Affiliation
MCH-Epidemiology Unit, Alaska Division of Public Health, Anchorage, AK, USA. jwp22@live.unc.edu
Source
Pages 472-479 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):472-479
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Child Abuse - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Age
Young Adult
Abstract
Serious physical abuse resulting in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been implicated as an underreported cause of infant mortality. Nearly 80% of all abusive head trauma (AHT) occurs among children
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986886 View in PubMed
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Acetabular dysplasia in the Sami population: a population study among Sami in north Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86462
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):147-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Johnsen Knut
Goll Rosmus
Reikerås Olav
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sami Health Research, Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. knut.johnsen@unn.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Feb;67(1):147-53
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Bone Diseases, Developmental - complications - ethnology
Continental Population Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hip Joint
Humans
Low Back Pain - complications - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the acetabular coverage of the femoral head as measured by the centre-edge (CE) angle of Wiberg and to evaluate any association between low back pain and hip dysplasia in a Sami-dominated area (the municipalities of Karasjok and Kautokeino) in north Norway. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population-based study, which included questionnaires and a radiographic examination of the hips. METHODS: A total of 1723 individuals were invited to participate in a general health survey. Of these, 78.2% attended the screening and filled out a questionnaire that included questions about ethnicity and symptoms of back problems; 836 participants returned the questionnaire. Back problems were reported by 210 participants, the rest had no complaints. All 210 participants with back problems and a random sample of 206 with no back pain were invited for a radiographic examination, 75% and 76%, respectively, showed up for the examination. RESULTS: The centre-edge (CE) angle of Wiberg was found to be 28 (+/-7) and 27 (+/-7) degrees for the left and right hip, respectively. Our results showed that 17% of the Sami had definite dysplasia, 21% had light dysplasia and 62% had normal hip joints. Thus, 38% of the Sami had more or less dysplastic hips. The oldest participants had a significantly smaller CE-angle than the younger ones. However, no associations were found between acetabular dysplasia and back complaints. CONCLUSIONS: A high prevalence of hip dysplasia was found in this Sami-dominant area. No significant association could be found between low back pain and dysplasia.
PubMed ID
18468266 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of the evolution of atherosclerosis in men over a 25-year period in 11 European and Asiatic cities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54287
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Vikhert
V S Zhdanov
N H Sternby
J. Dusková
I E Galakhov
Author Affiliation
A. L. Myasnikov Institute of Clinical Cardiology, Russian Cardiologic Scientific Centre, Moscow.
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aorta - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - pathology
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Disease Progression
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Repeated epidemiologic study of atherosclerosis in males on the basis of autopsy material with 25-year interval (1963-66 and 1985-89) has been performed in 7 European cities (Malmö, Praha, Riga, Tallinn, Tartu, Kharkov, Yalta) and 4 Asia cities (Ashkhabad, Bishkek, Irkutsk, Yakutsk). Accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the 2nd study has been revealed in males in the majority of cities except Malmö and Praha. No significant differences in atherosclerosis of aorta and coronary arteries were found in these two cities. An increase of the calcinosis surface in the coronary arteries combined with a higher incidence of coronary stenosis was typical for the 2nd study. Atherosclerosis was less pronounced in the indigenous population of Ashkhabad, Bishkek and Yakutsk in both studied than in non-indigenous populations. There was a positive correlation in males between lethality of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis. Thus, the course of atherosclerosis can change within the life of one generation.
PubMed ID
9949896 View in PubMed
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ADH and ALDH polymorphisms among Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10681
Source
Alaska Med. 1999 Jan-Mar;41(1):9-12, 23
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Segal
Author Affiliation
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage 99508, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 1999 Jan-Mar;41(1):9-12, 23
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Alcohol Dehydrogenase - genetics
Alcoholism - genetics
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase - genetics
Alleles
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups - genetics
Ethanol - metabolism
Female
Genotype
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Inuits - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHs) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) involved in alcohol metabolism are polymorphic. Different alleles encode subunits of the enzymes that are related to differences in alcohol metabolism with different ethnic groups. This study examined the allele frequencies at the ADH1, ADH2, ADH3 and ALDH2 loci in Alaska Natives entering treatment for alcoholism to determine if allele frequencies at these loci differ among five distinct Alaska Native groups: Yupik and Inupiat Eskimos, Athabascan, Tlingit and Aleut. It was found that all persons were homozygous for the ADH1*1, ADH2*1 and ALDH2*1 alleles. Variations, however, were found for the allele distribution of the ADH3 genotype. Comparison with a general population sample found no differences in allele distributions for ADHs and ALDH2*1, but differences were found when comparisons were made with four Asian Groups. The study's findings suggest that the Alaska Natives are not protected from the risk of alcoholism in the same way that Asians who possess the ALDH2*2 genotype are considered to have a negative risk factor. Nor, does there appear to be any generalized differences between Alaska Native alcoholics and members of the general population with respect to the ALDH and ADH polymorphisms studied herein.
PubMed ID
10224678 View in PubMed
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Adherence to guidelines for follow-up of low-grade cytologic abnormalities among medically underserved women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3866
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jun;105(6):1323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Vicki B Benard
Herschel W Lawson
Christie R Eheman
Christa Anderson
William Helsel
Author Affiliation
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. vdb9@cdc.gov
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2005 Jun;105(6):1323-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group
Age Factors
Colposcopy
Continental Population Groups
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Practice Guidelines
United States
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether women in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) who had findings on a Papanicolaou (Pap) test of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were followed up in accordance with the interim guidelines for management of abnormal cervical cytology. METHODS: For this study period, the guidelines for a Pap result of ASC-US or LSIL specified follow-up by Pap tests repeated every 4 to 6 months for 2 years. If a second report of ASC-US or LSIL was made, the patient was to have colposcopy. We analyzed data from 10,004 women who had a result of ASC-US or LSIL followed by a second ASC-US or LSIL from 1991-2000. RESULTS: As judged by the guidelines, 44% of women who had 2 low-grade abnormalities were followed up appropriately with colposcopy. Among women with 2 ASC-US results, those aged less than 30 years were more likely to receive colposcopy than the other age groups, while women who were aged 60 years and older were more likely to be followed up with a third Pap test. For each of the 4 result groups, American Indian or Alaska Native women had the highest percentages of a third Pap test, whereas Black or African-American women had a higher percentage of no follow-up. CONCLUSION: More than one half of the women studied were not followed up in accordance with the established guidelines for managing abnormal cervical cytology. Factors such as age and race or ethnicity influence whether women with cytologic abnormalities receive appropriate follow-up.
PubMed ID
15932824 View in PubMed
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Adult obesity prevalence in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134392
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Margot Shields
Margaret D Carroll
Cynthia L Ogden
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Health Analysis Division.
Source
NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Mar;(56):1-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Obesity is a public health challenge throughout the world. Ongoing monitoring of trends in obesity is important to assess interventions aimed at preventing or reducing the burden of obesity. Since the 1960s, measured height and weight have been collected in the United States as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In Canada, data on measured height and weight have been collected from nationally representative samples of the population less regularly. This changed in 2007 with the launch of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS), the scope and purpose of which are similar to those of NHANES. The objective of this report is to compare estimates of the prevalence of obesity between Canadian and American adults.
PubMed ID
21592419 View in PubMed
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Adverse outcomes among Aboriginal patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141916
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Sep 21;182(13):1433-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-2010
Author
Manish M Sood
Paul Komenda
Amy R Sood
Martina Reslerova
Mauro Verrelli
Chris Sathianathan
Loretta Eng
Amanda Eng
Claudio Rigatto
Author Affiliation
Departments of Medicine, St. Boniface Hospital, Winnipeg, Man. msood@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Sep 21;182(13):1433-9
Date
Sep-21-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Continental Population Groups
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Peritoneal Dialysis - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Rural Population
Treatment Outcome
Urban Population
Abstract
The Aboriginal population in Canada experiences high rates of end-stage renal disease and need for dialytic therapies. Our objective was to examine rates of mortality, technique failure and peritonitis among adult aboriginal patients receiving peritoneal dialysis in the province of Manitoba. We also aimed to explore whether differences in these rates may be accounted for by location of residence (i.e., urban versus rural).
We included all adult patients residing in the province of Manitoba who received peritoneal dialysis during the period from 1997-2007 (n = 727). We extracted data from a local administrative database and from the Canadian Organ Replacement Registry and the Peritonitis Organism Exit-sites/Tunnel infections (POET) database. We used Cox and logistic regression models to determine the relationship between outcomes and Aboriginal ethnicity. We performed Kaplan-Meier analyses to examine the relationship between outcomes and urban (i.e., 50 km or less from the primary dialysis centre in Winnipeg) versus rural (i.e., more than 50 km from the centre) residency among patients who were aboriginal.
One hundred sixty-one Aboriginal and 566 non-Aboriginal patients were included in the analyses. Adjusted hazard ratios for mortality (HR 1.476, CI 1.073-2.030) and adjusted time to peritonitis (HR 1.785, CI 1.352-2.357) were significantly higher among Aboriginal patients than among non-Aboriginal patients. We found no significant differences in mortality, technique failure or peritonitis between urban- or rural-residing Aboriginal patients.
Compared with non-Aboriginal patients receiving peritoneal dialysis, Aboriginal patients receiving peritoneal dialysis had higher mortality and faster time to peritonitis independent of comorbidities and demographic characteristics. This effect was not influenced by place of residence, whether rural or urban.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20660579 View in PubMed
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494 records – page 1 of 50.