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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory teaching: do approaches to learning predict the site and preceptor characteristics valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172409
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M Dianne Delva
Karen W Schultz
John R Kirby
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mdd2@post.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Learning
Ontario
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
In a study to determine the site and preceptor characteristics most valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting we wished to confirm whether these would support effective learning. The deep approach to learning is thought to be more effective for learning than surface approaches. In this study we determined how the approaches to learning of clerks and residents predicted the valued site and preceptor characteristics in the ambulatory setting.
Postal survey of all medical residents and clerks in training in Ontario determining the site and preceptor characteristics most valued in the ambulatory setting. Participants also completed the Workplace Learning questionnaire that includes 3 approaches to learning scales and 3 workplace climate scales. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict the preferred site and preceptor characteristics as the dependent variables by the average scores of the approaches to learning and perception of workplace climate scales as the independent variables.
There were 1642 respondents, yielding a 47.3% response rate. Factor analysis revealed 7 preceptor characteristics and 6 site characteristics valued in the ambulatory setting. The Deep approach to learning scale predicted all of the learners' preferred preceptor characteristics (beta = 0.076 to beta = 0.234, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
16225666 View in PubMed
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The benefits and risks of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination among infants at high risk for both tuberculosis and severe combined immunodeficiency: assessment by Markov model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170405
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2006;6:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Michael Clark
D William Cameron
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1H 8L6, Canada. mclar018@uottawa.ca
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2006;6:5
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - adverse effects
Blindness - etiology - psychology
Brain Damage, Chronic - etiology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Choice Behavior
Cohort Studies
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Markov Chains
Models, Theoretical
Monte Carlo Method
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk
Risk assessment
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tuberculosis, Meningeal - complications - psychology
Vaccination - adverse effects - mortality - psychology
Vision, Monocular
Abstract
Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is given to Canadian Aboriginal neonates in selected communities. Severe reactions and deaths associated with BCG have been reported among infants born with immunodeficiency syndromes. The main objective of this study was to estimate threshold values for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) incidence, above which BCG is associated with greater risk than benefit.
A Markov model was developed to simulate the natural histories of tuberculosis (TB) and SCID in children from birth to 14 years. The annual risk of tuberculous infection (ARI) and SCID incidence were varied in analyses. The model compared a scenario of no vaccination to intervention with BCG. Appropriate variability and uncertainty analyses were conducted. Outcomes included TB incidence and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs).
In sensitivity analyses, QALYs were lower among vaccinated infants if the ARI was 0.1% and the rate of SCID was higher than 4.2 per 100,000. Assuming an ARI of 1%, this threshold increased to 41 per 100,000. In uncertainty analyses (Monte Carlo simulations) which assumed an ARI of 0.1%, QALYs were not significantly increased by BCG unless SCID incidence is 0. With this ARI, QALYs were significantly decreased among vaccinated children if SCID incidence exceeds 23 per 100,000. BCG is associated with a significant increase in QALYs if the ARI is 1%, and SCID incidence is below 5 per 100,000.
The possibility that Canadian Aboriginal children are at increased risk for SCID has serious implications for continued BCG use in this population. In this context, enhanced TB Control--including early detection and treatment of infection--may be a safer, more effective alternative.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16515694 View in PubMed
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Choice and participation in the health services: a survey of preferences among Swedish residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208717
Source
Health Policy. 1997 May;40(2):157-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A. Anell
P. Rosén
C. Hjortsberg
Author Affiliation
Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund.
Source
Health Policy. 1997 May;40(2):157-68
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Decision Making
Health Care Surveys
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Medicine
Patient Education as Topic
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians, Family
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization
Sweden
Abstract
Extending the possibilities for health-service consumers to choose among providers has been an important objective on the political agenda in Sweden and elsewhere. Little is known, however, about individual and group preferences concerning the demand for choices. It is often implicitly assumed that individuals can be treated as a group with similar values and demands, but is this true? To what extent do individuals want more options in health care? Do preferences vary depending on age, education and place of living? This article explores these questions, starting from a survey of 2,000 residents in four Swedish counties. The results of the survey point to many similarities, but also indicate important differences among residents. In particular, preferences seem to vary significantly depending on age and level of education. On the other hand, older people are more favourably inclined towards the free choice of physician. On the other hand, members of the younger generation, as well as well-educated residents, demand a more active part in the process of medical decision making. These differences, as well as expectations from younger generations, pose a great challenge to the future management of health services.
PubMed ID
10167069 View in PubMed
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Cigarette brand preference as a function of price among smoking youths in Canada: are they smoking premium, discount or native brands?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148240
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):466-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
S T Leatherdale
R. Ahmed
A. Barisic
D. Murnaghan
S. Manske
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada. scott.leatherdale@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):466-73
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Canada - epidemiology
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Smoking - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
Given that little is known about the price-related cigarette brand preferences of youths, the current study seeks to characterise cigarette brand preferences and examine factors associated with smoking discount or native cigarette brands among Canadian youths who are current smokers.
This study used nationally representative data collected from 71,003 grade 5-12 students as part of the 2006-7 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey (YSS). Using data from current smokers, logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with smoking discount or native cigarette brands relative to premium cigarette brands.
In 2006, premium cigarettes were the most prevalent brand of cigarette youths report usually smoking (49.4%); a substantial number of youths do report usually smoking either discount (12.9%) or native (9.3%) cigarette brands. Occasional smokers were more likely to report usually smoking premium cigarettes whereas daily smokers were more likely to report smoking either discount or native cigarettes. In particular, discount and native brands appear to be appealing among smoking youths with less spending money or those who are heavier smokers compared to youths smoking premium brands.
Discount and native cigarette brands are commonly used by a substantial number of smoking youths in Canada. Additional research is required to better understand the reasons behind different cigarette brand preferences and how youths are able to access premium, discount and illicit native cigarettes. Moreover, ongoing surveillance of the cigarette brand preferences of youths is required for guiding future tobacco control policy and programming activities.
PubMed ID
19797534 View in PubMed
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Client and responder perceptions of a personal emergency response system: Lifeline.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161528
Source
Home Health Care Serv Q. 2007;26(3):1-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Wendy M Fallis
Diane Silverthorne
Jonathon Franklin
Susan McClement
Author Affiliation
Victoria General Hospital/University of Manitoba, Clinical Institute of Applied Research and Education, 2340 Pembina Hwy, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2E8. wfallis@vgh.mb.ca
Source
Home Health Care Serv Q. 2007;26(3):1-21
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems
Female
Health Care Surveys
Home Care Services
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Abstract
A mixed methodology mail survey was used to gauge level of customer satisfaction with, and identify issues that may help improve, personal emergency response system service delivery. A total of 1,236 surveys were mailed out to subscribers of Victoria Lifeline (Canada; n = 618) and their designated responders (n = 618). Overall response rate was 50%. Significant predictors of subscriber and responder satisfaction were satisfaction with the service during an emergency and whether expectations of service were met. In addition, for responders, customer service also predicted satisfaction. Thematic analysis of subscriber and responder comments identified the need for improvement in several areas: equipment, cost of the service, training sessions for users, and communication between subscribers and service providers. Although more than 95% of subscribers and responders were satisfied with the service, the findings provide direction to personal emergency response service providers about ways in which their product and service delivery might be enhanced, and underscore the need for research examining the impacts of response systems on family caregivers and public policy regarding community care solutions.
PubMed ID
17804350 View in PubMed
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Climate for work group creativity and innovation: Norwegian validation of the team climate inventory (TCI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177483
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Nov;45(5):383-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Gro Ellen Mathisen
Ståle Einarsen
Kari Jørstad
Kolbjørn S Brønnick
Author Affiliation
Stavanger University College, 4068 Stavanger, Norway. gro.e.mathisen@his.no
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Nov;45(5):383-92
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Creativity
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Norway
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The present study assessed the psychometric properties and the validity of the Norwegian translation of the Team Climate Inventory (TCI). The TCI is a measure of climate for innovation within groups at work and is based on the four-factor theory of climate for innovation (West, 1990). Cronbach's alpha revealed satisfactory reliabilities and exploratory factor analysis successfully extracted the four original factors as well as a fifth factor that has also been reported in other studies (N = 195 teams from a wide range of professions). Results from confirmatory factor analysis, using a different sample (N = 106 teams from the Norwegian public postal service), suggested that the five-factor solution had the most parsimonious fit. Criterion validity was explored by correlating TCI scores from 92 post offices and 395 postal distribution teams with customer satisfaction scores. Significant positive relationships were found between three of four TCI scales and customer satisfaction.
PubMed ID
15535807 View in PubMed
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Consumer satisfaction and supplier induced demand.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195945
Source
J Health Econ. 2000 Sep;19(5):731-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
F. Carlsen
J. Grytten
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway. fredrik.carlsen@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Health Econ. 2000 Sep;19(5):731-53
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Rationing
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medically underserved area
Models, Statistical
Norway
Physicians, Family - supply & distribution
Abstract
This study examines the relationship between supply of primary physicians and consumer satisfaction with access to, and quality of, primary physician services in Norway. The purpose is to throw light on a long-standing controversy in the literature on supplier inducement (SID): the interpretation of the positive association between physician density and per capita utilization of health services. We find that an increase in the number of physicians leads to improved consumer satisfaction, and that the relationship between satisfaction and physician density exhibits diminishing returns to scale. Our results suggest that policy-makers can compute the socially optimal density of physicians without knowledge about whether SID exists, if one accepts the (controversial) assumption that consumer satisfaction is a valid proxy for patient utility.
PubMed ID
11184802 View in PubMed
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Current and preferred housing of psychiatric consumers/survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178102
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(1):5-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Geoffrey Nelson
G Brent Hall
Cheryl Forchuk
Author Affiliation
Wilfrid Laurier University.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(1):5-19
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Female
Group Homes - utilization
Halfway Houses - utilization
Health Care Surveys
Housing
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Ontario
Public Assistance
Quality of Life
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
As part of a participatory action research project, we surveyed 300 psychiatric consumers/survivors from southwestern Ontario regarding their housing preferences and housing satisfaction. We found that, while 79% of the sample preferred independent living, 76% were living in some other type of setting (e.g., temporary shelter, supportive housing, sheltered care). Those living in temporary shelters reported the lowest levels of housing satisfaction, and those who were living in the type of housing that they preferred had the highest levels of housing satisfaction. This information is being used by stakeholder groups involved in the project to help build the capacity of the community to provide the types of housing that are preferred by consumers/survivors.
PubMed ID
15462577 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.