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52 records – page 1 of 6.

Advocating safety. "Whistle-blowing" in the U.S. and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190858
Source
AWHONN Lifelines. 2002 Feb-Mar;6(1):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Merry Little
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Care Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
AWHONN Lifelines. 2002 Feb-Mar;6(1):18-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Nurses' Association
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure
Humans
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Societies, Nursing
United States
PubMed ID
11913197 View in PubMed
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Bacterial contamination of animal feed and its relationship to human foodborne illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51655
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):859-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2002
Author
John A Crump
Patricia M Griffin
Frederick J Angulo
Author Affiliation
Foodborne and Diarrheal Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. jcrump@cdc.gov
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;35(7):859-65
Date
Oct-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed - microbiology
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Disease Outbreaks
Food Contamination
Humans
Meat Products - microbiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Salmonella enterica
Sweden
Typhoid Fever - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Animal feed is at the beginning of the food safety chain in the "farm-to-fork" model. The emergence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has raised awareness of the importance of contaminated animal feed, but less attention has been paid to the role of bacterial contamination of animal feed in human foodborne illness. In the United States, animal feed is frequently contaminated with non-Typhi serotypes of Salmonella enterica and may lead to infection or colonization of food animals. These bacteria can contaminate animal carcasses at slaughter or cross-contaminate other food items, leading to human illness. Although tracing contamination to its ultimate source is difficult, several large outbreaks have been traced back to contaminated animal feed. Improvements in the safety of animal feed should include strengthening the surveillance of animal feed for bacterial contamination and integration of such surveillance with human foodborne disease surveillance systems. A Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point program should be instituted for the animal feed industry, and a Salmonella-negative policy for feed should be enforced.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Apr 1;36(7):933-4; author reply 934-512652398
PubMed ID
12228823 View in PubMed
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Brain-Computer Interface devices: risks and Canadian regulations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156376
Source
Account Res. 2008 Apr-Jun;15(2):63-86
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sheri Alpert
Author Affiliation
Novel Tech Ethics, Intellectual Commons, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. salpert@dal.ca
Source
Account Res. 2008 Apr-Jun;15(2):63-86
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Device Approval - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Equipment Design
Equipment Safety
Humans
Prostheses and Implants - adverse effects - standards
Risk assessment
Self-Help Devices - adverse effects - standards
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Implantable Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) devices are currently in clinical trials in the U.S., and their introduction into the Canada could follow in the next few years. This article provides an overview of the research, developments, design issues, and risks in BCIs and an analysis of the adequacy of the regulatory framework in place for the approval of medical devices in Canada, emphasizing device investigational testing. The article concludes that until better safeguards are in place, to best protect potential research subjects, BCIs should not be approved for investigational testing in Canada.
PubMed ID
18593098 View in PubMed
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The Canadian Natural Health Products (NHP) regulations: industry perceptions and compliance factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169089
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Hina Laeeque
Heather Boon
Natasha Kachan
Jillian Clare Cohen
Joseph D'Cruz
Author Affiliation
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. hina.laeeque@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2006;6:63
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Supplements - standards
Drug Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence
Minerals - standards
Product Line Management - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Questionnaires
Vitamins - standards
Abstract
The use of natural health products, such as vitamins, minerals, and herbs, by Canadians has been increasing with time. As a result of consumer concern about the quality of these products, the Canadian Department of Health created the Natural Health Products (NHP) Regulations. The new Canadian regulations raise questions about whether and how the NHP industry will be able to comply and what impact they will have on market structure. The objectives of this study were to explore who in the interview sample is complying with Canada's new NHP Regulations (i.e., submitted product licensing applications on time); and explore the factors that affect regulatory compliance.
Twenty key informant interviews were conducted with employees of the NHP industry. The structured interviews focused on the level of satisfaction with the Regulations and perceptions of compliance and non-compliance. Interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed verbatim. Data were independently coded, using qualitative content analysis. Team meetings were held after every three to four interviews to discuss emerging themes.
The major finding of this study is that most (17 out of 20) companies interviewed were beginning to comply with the new regulatory regime. The factors that contribute to likelihood of regulatory compliance were: perceptions and knowledge of the regulations and business size.
The Canadian case can be instructive for other countries seeking to implement regulatory standards for natural health products. An unintended consequence of the Canadian NHP regulations may be the exit of smaller firms, leading to industry consolidation.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Nov 11;280(18):1569-759820257
PubMed ID
16734916 View in PubMed
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The Canadian perspective: trends in drug and medical device class actions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167389
Source
Food Drug Law J. 2006;61(3):569-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
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Class actions in breast implant litigation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212868
Source
Health Law Can. 1996 Feb;16(3):78-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
M J Peerless
M A Eizenga
Author Affiliation
Siskind, Cromarty, Ivey & Dowler, London, Ontario.
Source
Health Law Can. 1996 Feb;16(3):78-83
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Implants - standards
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Equipment Failure
Female
Humans
Liability, Legal
Silicones - adverse effects
PubMed ID
10173416 View in PubMed
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Costs of two alternative Salmonella control policies in Finnish broiler production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159999
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2007;49:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Susanna Kangas
Tapani Lyytikäinen
Jukka Peltola
Jukka Ranta
Riitta Maijala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 66, Agnes Sjöberginkatu 2, FI-00014, University of Helsinki, Finland. susanna.kangas@iki.fi
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2007;49:35
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Chickens
Communicable Disease Control - economics
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Food Contamination
Food Microbiology
Humans
Poultry
Salmonella Food Poisoning - economics - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - economics - prevention & control
Zoonoses
Abstract
Costs and benefits of two Salmonella control policies for broiler production were described and compared. The control options were the Zoonosis Directive 92/117/EC and the more intense strategy, the Finnish Salmonella Control Programme (FSCP).
The comparison included the Salmonella control costs in primary and secondary production and the direct and indirect losses due to Salmonella infections in humans in 2000.
The total annual costs of the FSCP were calculated to be 990 400 EUR (0.02 euro/kg broiler meat). The average control costs in the broiler production chain were seven times higher with the FSCP than with the Zoonosis Directive alone. However, the public health costs were 33 times higher with the Zoonosis Directive alone. The value of one prevented loss of life per year exceeded the annual control costs of the FSCP.
Due to significant savings in public health costs compared to costs of FSCP, the FSCP was found to be economically feasible.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18053202 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.