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343 records – page 1 of 35.

Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165658
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
J. Bruce Prince
David M Andrus
Kevin Gwinner
Author Affiliation
College of Business Administration, Kansas State University, Calvin 101, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA. jbprince@ksu.edu
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2006;33(4):517-24
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Canada
Career Choice
Consumer Product Safety
Delphi Technique
Education, Veterinary - manpower - trends
Food Supply
Forecasting
Humans
Schools, Veterinary - manpower - trends
United States
Veterinary Medicine - manpower - trends
Abstract
The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.
PubMed ID
17220489 View in PubMed
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Advocating safety. "Whistle-blowing" in the U.S. and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190858
Source
AWHONN Lifelines. 2002 Feb-Mar;6(1):18-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Merry Little
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Care Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
AWHONN Lifelines. 2002 Feb-Mar;6(1):18-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Nurses' Association
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Disclosure
Humans
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Societies, Nursing
United States
PubMed ID
11913197 View in PubMed
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Agencies cooperate in ensuring safe use of antineoplastic agents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242019
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Apr 15;128(8):907-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1983
Author
J. Ashwin
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Apr 15;128(8):907-8
Date
Apr-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Agents
Canada
Consumer Product Safety
Health Systems Agencies
Humans
United States
PubMed ID
6831335 View in PubMed
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Analysis of cured meat products for cryptosporidium oocysts following possible contamination during an extensive waterborne outbreak of Cryptosporidiosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124610
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 May;75(5):982-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Lucy J Robertson
Qirong Huang
Author Affiliation
Parasitology Laboratory, Section for Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O. Box 8146 Dep, 0033 Oslo, Norway. Lucy.Robertson@nvh.no
Source
J Food Prot. 2012 May;75(5):982-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Consumer Product Safety
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification
Disease Outbreaks
Food contamination - analysis
Food Parasitology
Humans
Meat Products - parasitology
Oocysts
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of waterborne cryptosporidiosis in a town in northern Sweden during winter 2010 resulted in the potential exposure of cured meat products to Cryptosporidium oocysts during their manufacture. The purpose of this work was to develop a method for analyzing cured meat products for contamination with Cryptosporidium oocysts and use this method to analyze potentially contaminated product samples. A simple method of elution, concentration, separation, and detection was used, based on work with other food matrices but adapted for the relatively high fat content of cured meat surfaces. Using spiking experiments, the recovery efficiency of this method was found to be over 60%. In the analysis of the potentially contaminated products, only one putative Cryptosporidium oocyst was detected, and this was sufficiently deformed so that it could not be confirmed as an oocyst; if it was an oocyst, it was considered to have been probably deformed and inactivated prior to analysis. Based on the results of the analyses, together with data on the probable extent of contamination of the products and on our knowledge of factors, such as water activity, which affect oocyst survival, the products were safely released to the market.
PubMed ID
22564952 View in PubMed
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Analysis of paediatric injuries related to child restraint seats: are children at higher risk of injury outside the vehicle than inside?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161625
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2007 Sep;14(3):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
E B R Desapriya
I. Pike
A. Singhal
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculties of Medicine and Surgery, University of British Columbia, BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit, Centre for Community Child Health Research, Vancouver, BC, Canada. edesap@cw.bc.ca
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2007 Sep;14(3):196-8
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Consumer Product Safety
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Humans
Infant Equipment - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seat Belts - adverse effects
PubMed ID
17729140 View in PubMed
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Anatoxin-a and its metabolites in blue-green algae food supplements from Canada and Portugal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164436
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Mar;70(3):776-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Dorothea F K Rawn
Barbara Niedzwiadek
Benjamin P Y Lau
Martin Saker
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, 2203D, 251 Sir Frederick Banting Driveway, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Food Prot. 2007 Mar;70(3):776-9
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid - methods
Chromatography, Liquid
Consumer Product Safety
Cyanobacteria - metabolism
Dietary Supplements - analysis - microbiology - standards
Fluorescence
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Portugal
Sensitivity and specificity
Spirulina - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Tropanes - analysis
Abstract
Blue-green algae and spirulina are marketed in health food stores and over the Internet as food supplements in Canada, the United States, and Europe. The reported benefits of consuming these products include improved digestion, strengthening of the immune system, and relief from the symptoms of attention deficit disorder. Some of these products have been found to contain elevated concentrations of microcystins, which are known hepatotoxins. In addition to producing microcystins, Anabaena sp. and Aphanizomenon sp. also produce the potent neurotoxin anatoxin-a. Samples of food supplements containing blue-green algae and spirulina were collected in Portugal and from urban centers across Canada in 2005. Extracts of these supplements were analyzed to determine the presence and concentrations of anatoxin-a and its two main metabolites, dihydroanatoxin-a and epoxyanatoxin-a. Initial analyses were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection, and confirmation required the use of LC with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The HPLC with fluorescence detection indicated no anatoxin-a, but four samples were suspected to contain either dihydroanatoxin-a or epoxyanatoxin-a at 0.1 to 0.2 microg/g. LC-MS-MS results, however, indicated no trace of either transformation product in any sample analyzed. The detection limits for anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, and epoxyanatoxin-a were similar for both fluorescence detection (0.2 to 0.3, 0.4 to 1.4, and 0.2 to 1.5 pg on the column, respectively) and mass spectrometry (0.3 to 1.5, 0.3 to 0.8, and 0.5 to 0.8 pg on the column, respectively). Because of the higher specificity of the LC-MS-MS analysis, all tested food supplement samples were considered free of anatoxin-a and its transformation products.
PubMed ID
17388076 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of sampling- and culturing methods in the Norwegian action plan against Campylobacter in broilers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75458
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2006 Feb 15;106(3):313-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2006
Author
Marianne Sandberg
Øyvin Østensvik
Agnete Lien Aunsmo
Eystein Skjerve
Merete Hofshagen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, P.O.Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2006 Feb 15;106(3):313-7
Date
Feb-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Campylobacter - growth & development - isolation & purification
Cecum - microbiology
Chickens - microbiology
Cloaca - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial - methods - veterinary
Consumer Product Safety
Feces - microbiology
Food Contamination - analysis - prevention & control
Food-Processing Industry - methods - standards
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Norway
Sensitivity and specificity
Temperature
Abstract
The Norwegian Action Plan against Campylobacter in broilers was implemented in May 2001 with the objective of reducing human exposure to Campylobacter through Norwegian broilers. From each flock, samples collected at the farm about one week prior to slaughter, and then again at the slaughter plant, are examined for the presence of Campylobacter. All farmers with positive flocks are followed up with bio-security advice. Sampling of broiler products at retail level is also included in the Action Plan. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existing sampling and culturing methods of the Norwegian Action Plan against Campylobacter in broilers. The material collected was pooled faecal samples, pooled cloacae samples and caecae samples from individuals. The highest number of positives, from culturing of the pooled faecal samples, the pooled cloacae swabs and the caecae swabs from individuals, were obtained at incubation temperature 41.5 degrees C. When comparing the results at incubation temperature 37 and 41.5 degrees C, the faecal samples from the farms demonstrated a high concordance, with a kappa value of 0.88. The results from culturing cloacae swabs and caecae samples from slaughter plant level at two temperatures did not agree very well with a kappa value of 0.21 and moderate value of 0.57, respectively, but were both disconcordant at a level of 0.05. Modelling farm level data indicated that if increasing the number of pooled samples per flock from two (in existing regime) to three, the flock sensitivity increases from 89% to 95%. Modelling of slaughter plant data indicated that three pooled cloacae swabs are needed to identify 90% of the positive flocks. The results from the modelling of caecae data indicated that samples from seven individuals are sufficient to identify 90% of the positive flocks and caecae samples could thus be an alternative to cloacae sampling at slaughter plant level.
PubMed ID
16263188 View in PubMed
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Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Nov;67(8):5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1990
Author
C. Krogh
Author Affiliation
Canadian Pharmaceutical Association, Ottawa.
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1990 Nov;67(8):5
Date
Nov-1990
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Product Safety - standards
Drug Combinations
Drug Labeling - standards
Humans
Societies, Pharmaceutical
PubMed ID
2276526 View in PubMed
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343 records – page 1 of 35.