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15 records – page 1 of 2.

Consumers devise drug cost-cutting measures: medical and legal issues to consider.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183802
Source
Health Care Manag (Frederick). 2003 Jul-Sep;22(3):275-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gouranga Ganguli
Author Affiliation
Department of Accounting and Business Law, 1201 W. University Drive, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburgh, TX 78539, USA.
Source
Health Care Manag (Frederick). 2003 Jul-Sep;22(3):275-81
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Cost Control - methods
Drug Costs - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drugs, Generic - economics
Financing, Personal - trends
Humans
Mexico
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Prescription Fees - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Travel
United States
Abstract
Health care costs in general, and prescription drug costs in particular, are rapidly rising. Between 1996 and 2007 the average annual per capita health care cost is projected to increase from dollar 3,781 to dollar 7,100. [AQ1] The single leading component of health care cost is the cost of prescription drugs (currently 10% of total health care spending, projected to become 18% in 2008). The average cost per drug increased 40% during the 1993-1998 period. Forty-one million Americans have no health insurance, and those who have, have inadequate prescription drug coverage. [AQ2] To cope with this situation, many consumers are trying to economize by doing without the prescriptions or the appropriate doses, buying generics or medicines from Canada or Mexico, or splitting pills of higher doses to take advantage of the pricing policy of drug manufacturers. Some of these approaches are medically and/or legally acceptable, while some are dubious. Most adversely affected are the seniors and poor; for certain groups of seniors prescription drugs account for 30% of their health care spending. The problem must receive prompt concerted attention from consumers, insurers, pharmaceutical companies, and lawmakers before it gets out of hand.
PubMed ID
12956230 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consumer-sponsored health centers and health reforms in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216709
Source
J Ambul Care Manage. 1995 Jan;18(1):39-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
R. Lepnurm
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
J Ambul Care Manage. 1995 Jan;18(1):39-46
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Centers - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Consumer Participation - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Fee-for-Service Plans
Health Care Costs
Health Care Reform - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Models, organizational
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
The community health center movement, begun in Saskatchewan, is central to successsfully reforming the Canadian health care system. The arguments of 30 years ago are relevant today. Canadian Medicare is at the crossroads. The evidence shows that the provision of primary health care through community health centers is cost effective and that the quality of care is at least as high in these settings as in traditional fee-for-service settings. Each province must encourage the development of a network of community health centers capable of providing services to every resident who wishes to receive all of his or her primary care "under one roof."
PubMed ID
10139345 View in PubMed
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Crazy for bargains: inventing the irrational female shopper in modernizing English Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128145
Source
Can Hist Rev. 2011;92(4):581-606
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Donica Belisle
Source
Can Hist Rev. 2011;92(4):581-606
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Commerce - economics - education - history
Consumer Participation - economics - history - psychology
Femininity - history
Gender Identity
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Household Articles - economics - history
Household Products - economics - history
Humans
Marketing - economics - education - history
Masculinity - history
Social Behavior - history
Social Change - history
Social Class - history
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Women - education - history - psychology
Women's Health - ethnology - history
Abstract
Between the 1890s and 1930s, anglophone politicians, journalists, novelists, and other commentators living in western, central, and eastern Canada drew upon established connections among greed, luxury, hysteria, and femininity to describe women who went shopping as irrational. Their motivations for doing so included their desires to assuage feelings of guilt about increased abundance; articulate anger caused by spousal conflicts over money; assert the legitimacy of male authority; and assign blame for the decline of small communities’ sustainability, the degradation of labour standards, and the erosion of independent shopkeeping. By calling upon stock stereotypes of femininity, and by repositioning them to fit the current capitalist moment, English-Canadian commentators constructed disempowering representations of women to alleviate their anxieties about what they perceived as the ills of modernization.
PubMed ID
22229163 View in PubMed
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[Current problems in price formation in public health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210604
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;(6):31-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
I V Poliakov
S A Uvarov
V D Seleznev
T M Zelenskaia
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;(6):31-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Reform - economics
Humans
Marketing of Health Services - economics
Public Health - economics
Quality of Health Care - economics
Russia
Abstract
Adequate policy of price formation is one condition for effective development of public health under conditions of market economy. The authors present the fundamentals of price formation in public health under conditions of state financing, insurance, and self-support. Price formation should promote the activities of public health institutions, aimed at improving the quality of medical aid to the population and at the creation of conditions for the welfare of medical workers.
PubMed ID
9235267 View in PubMed
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The doctor as double agent: information asymmetry, health insurance, and medical care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227834
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):411-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
A. Blomqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
J Health Econ. 1991;10(4):411-32
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Costs and Cost Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Maintenance Organizations - economics
Humans
Information Theory
Insurance, Physician Services - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, Econometric
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Stochastic Processes
Abstract
In a model incorporating uncertainty and state-dependent utility of health services, as well as information asymmetry between patients/buyers and physicians/sellers, two types of equilibria are compared: (1) when consumers have conventional third-party insurance and doctors are paid on the basis of fee-for-service; and (2) when insurance is through an HMO which provides health services through its own doctors. Conditions are found under which contractual or legal incentives can overcome the information asymmetry problem and bring about an efficient allocation of resources to health services provision.
PubMed ID
10117012 View in PubMed
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Does receiving an earnings supplement affect union formation? Estimating effects for program participants using propensity score matching.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166646
Source
Eval Rev. 2006 Dec;30(6):741-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Kristen Harknett
Author Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania, USA.
Source
Eval Rev. 2006 Dec;30(6):741-78
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation - economics
Employment - economics
Female
Humans
Marriage - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
New Brunswick
Single Parent
Social Welfare - economics
Abstract
This article demonstrates a novel application of propensity score matching techniques: to estimate nonexperimental impacts on program participants within the context of an experimental research design. The author examines the relationship between program participation, defined as qualifying for an earnings supplement by working full-time, and marital union formation among low-income mothers in two Canadian provinces. The author finds that receipt of an earnings supplement substantially increased union formation in one province but not the other. A subgroup analysis based on propensities of program participation revealed that the positive effect on unions was concentrated among relatively disadvantaged participants. The techniques demonstrated in the article are broadly applicable to studies in which take-up is less than 100% among those randomly assigned to a program group.
PubMed ID
17093107 View in PubMed
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Do vehicle grants and vehicle adaptations grants promote transport mobility and community access for children with disabilities in Sweden?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127655
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2012 Feb;59(1):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Linda Sjödin
Angus Buchanan
Beate Mundt
Emelie Karlsson
Torbjörn Falkmer
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Clinic, Landstinget Kronoberg, SE, Ljungby, Sweden. linda.sjodin@ltkronoberg.se
Source
Aust Occup Ther J. 2012 Feb;59(1):10-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Automobiles - economics
Child
Consumer Participation - economics
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Financing, Organized - economics
Humans
Mobility Limitation
Occupational therapy
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Safety - economics
Sweden
Travel
Abstract
A vast majority of the journeys made by children with disabilities in Sweden are in the family car, which usually is bought and adapted for the child with governmental subsidies. Despite the important philosophical views about accessible vehicles, little is known about the impact of vehicle adaptations on families' lives. The aim of the study was to investigate parent views about the impact of vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants on their children's transport mobility and community access.
In total, 434 parents of children with disabilities in Sweden who had received vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants between 1998-2007 responded to a questionnaire comprising questions with both pre-selected and open-ended answers. A non-responder analysis was performed.
Children with disabilities were found to increase their transport mobility and community access in society as vehicle grants and/or vehicle adaptation grants were given to their parents. Their travel patterns and their travel priorities with their family car indicated that family friends and relatives and leisure activities were frequently visited and prioritised destinations. The grants were linked to access to social and family activities, provided environmental gains and led to increased experienced security. The results also showed that the potential to make spontaneous trips had increased substantially and that families experienced feelings of freedom and enhanced community access. The non-responder analysis confirmed these results.
According to parents, vehicle grants and vehicle adaptation grants for children with disabilities have a positive impact on the children's transport mobility and community access.
PubMed ID
22272878 View in PubMed
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Economic considerations for dispensing pharmacists: the impact of price-quality evaluations on brand categorization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235445
Source
J Pharm Mark Manage. 1986;1(1):41-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
M. Laroche
J. Rosenblatt
L. Wahler
F. Bliemel
Source
J Pharm Mark Manage. 1986;1(1):41-60
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Making
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Models, Psychological
Abstract
This paper examines consumer brand categorization in view of price-quality evaluations. In particular it examines the relationship of the Brisoux and Laroche (1980) brand categorization process and the Bliemel (1984) conceptualization of consumers' price-quality evaluations, in a pharmaceutical marketing context. The findings suggest that: the Brisoux-Laroche conceptualization is supported in a pharmaceutical/industrial marketing scenario; and, the pharmacists' categorization of brands (i.e., into the evoked, hold, foggy, and reject sets) can be partially explained as an outcome of a price-quality evaluation process.
PubMed ID
10312129 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hospital reimbursement - back to the drawing board.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244515
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 May;58(5):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981

15 records – page 1 of 2.