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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of men and women who complete or exit from an on-line internet sexuality questionnaire: a study of instrument dropout biases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52047
Source
J Sex Res. 2003 Nov;40(4):396-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Michael W Ross
Kristian Daneback
Sven-Axel Mansson
Ronny Tikkanen
Al Cooper
Author Affiliation
WHO Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, School of Public Health, University of Texas, PO Box 20036, Houston, TX 77225, USA. mross@sph.uth.tmc.edu.
Source
J Sex Res. 2003 Nov;40(4):396-402
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Participation - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Patient Dropouts - psychology
Questionnaires - standards
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sexuality - psychology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
This study compared respondents who completed an Internet sexuality questionnaire and those who dropped out before completion. The study was in Swedish and comprised 3,614 respondents over a 2-week period (53% males, 47% females). There were significant differences between males, of whom 51% dropped out before completion of the 175-item questionnaire, and females, of whom 43% dropped out. Dropout in both genders followed a curve of negative acceleration. The data suggest that dropout is likely to be significant and gender and demographically biased, and to occur significantly earlier for men than for women. Geography, education, sexual orientation, age, relationship status, living arrangements, and Internet connection speed were related to dropout for men, while only relationship status and living arrangements, which were in the opposite direction from men, were related to dropout in women.
PubMed ID
14735413 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys, 1987-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51830
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mette Kjøller
Henrik Thoning
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. mk@niph.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Consumer Participation - trends
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Refusal to Participate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The types and quantity of non-response in surveys influence the extent to which the results may be generalized. This study analysed trends in non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys from 1987 to 1994 and used the National Patient Registry to assess whether non-response biased the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on responders. METHODS: The data were for the 23,096 adults sampled for the Danish Health Interview Surveys in 1987, 1991 and 1994. All were followed using the National Patient Registry to obtain such information as hospital admissions. RESULTS: Non-response increased from 20.0% in 1987 to 22.6% in 1994. Four combinations of background variables characterized the non-response: gender and age; gender and civil status; county of residence and age; survey year and age. Non-respondents and respondents had identical gender- and age-standardized hospital admission rates for approximately 5 years before and 2 years after data collection, but non-respondents had a significantly higher rate immediately before and during data collection. Admissions rates were analysed according to reasons for non-response. Refusers had a lower admission rate than respondents before data collection but similar during and after data collection. The rate was higher during the whole period among ill or disabled non-respondents. Among people who could not be contacted during the data collection period a higher admission rate was only found immediately before and during data collection. CONCLUSIONS: Although admission rates differed between respondents and non-respondents these differences were too small to bias the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on respondents.
PubMed ID
16051660 View in PubMed
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Community-based research as a tool for empowerment: the Haida Gwaii Diabetes Project example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3199
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):109-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
C P Herbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):109-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Health Aides - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - prevention & control
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration
Family Practice - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Interinstitutional Relations
Power (Psychology)
Research - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The evolution of the Haida Gwaii Diabetes Project exemplifies how community-based family practice research can be a tool for empowerment for both the community of research participants and the community based members of the research team. The aims of the project are to develop a better understanding of Haida beliefs about diabetes; to develop culturally sensitive approaches to prevention and management; and to attempt to apply this understanding to the development of a model for preventive health for native people in the province of British Columbia. A participatory research paradigm, coupled with explicit working principles by which the research team agreed to operate, addressed the concerns that the Aboriginal community had about the risks of research. A true working partnership has developed among all members of the research team, and with the Haida community.
PubMed ID
8753639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community-building versus career-building research: the challenges, risks, and responsibilities of conducting research with Aboriginal and Native American communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3870
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):41-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Terry Leigh Mitchell
Emerance Baker
Author Affiliation
Native American Cancer Research, Pine, CO 80470-7830, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(1 Suppl):41-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - ethics - methods
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Patient Selection - ethics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
United States
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Aboriginal Women's Cancer Care Project used a participatory research model guided by an Aboriginal advisory group. METHODS: The researchers attempted to conduct cancer research with 5 culturally and geographically different communities in North America. RESULTS: We discuss the challenges of conducting ethical research in keeping with the emergent research principles of community ownership and control of the research process and products. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are many perils for researchers and communities in conducting participatory research, clearer practice guidelines will ensure that research in Aboriginal communities will increasingly prioritize community- versus career-building outcomes.
PubMed ID
15916520 View in PubMed
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Co-operation, participation and conflicts faced in public health--lessons learned from a long-term prevention programme in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48448
Source
Health Educ Res. 1994 Sep;9(3):317-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
I. Brännström
M. Emmelin
L. Dahlgren
M. Johansson
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Educ Res. 1994 Sep;9(3):317-29
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - prevention & control
Female
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention
Program Evaluation
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
A comprehensive community-based programme for prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes was established in 1985 in a small municipality in northern Sweden. A cross-sectional survey to the general public was performed and semi-structured open-ended interviews were taken of actors at different levels. Notes from official records were also included in the study. The aim was to describe and discuss some factors that promote or constrain community participation in health programmes. The results generally confirmed that the right of definition concerning the health programme mainly remained with the health professionals. Community participation was mainly defined by the actors based on the medical and health planning approach and, thereby, as a means to transform health policy plans into reality by transmitting health knowledge and increasing consciousness among the citizens of the need for changing lifestyles. However, participation as a means of identifying problems and demonstrating power relationships and as elements in promoting local democracy was hardly represented among the actors at all. Overall, the CVD health programme was characterized by consensus between the actors. Despite this, debates and arguments about interpretations, social interests, personal conflicts and ideological constraints were observed. However, a majority of the public wanted the CVD preventive programme to continue.
PubMed ID
10150452 View in PubMed
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Ethnic differences in social participation and social capital in Malmö, Sweden: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70807
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Apr;60(7):1527-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Martin Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, Lund University, Malmo University Hospital, S 205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Apr;60(7):1527-46
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - classification - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate ethnic differences in different aspects of social participation in Malmö, Sweden. The public health survey in Malmö 1994 is a cross-sectional study. A total of 5600 randomly chosen individuals aged 20-80 years were asked to complete a postal questionnaire. The participation rate was 71%. The population was divided into categories born in Sweden, Denmark/Norway, other Western countries, former Yugoslavia, Poland, Arabic speaking countries and all other countries. The age-adjusted and multivariate analyses were performed using a logistic regression model in order to investigate the importance of possible confounders (age, education, economic stress and unemployment) on the differences by country of origin in different aspects of social participation. Men and women born in Arabic speaking countries and other countries (Iran, Turkey, Vietnam, Chile and subsaharan Africa) participate to a significantly lower extent in a variety of civic and social activities when compared to the reference population born in Sweden. The differences in participation in these groups compared to the group born in Sweden are observed both for social participation items at the core of the definition of social capital and cultural and other activities unrelated to social capital. This pattern is particularly pronounced for women born in Arabic speaking countries. These women even sharply differ from the participation rates of men born in Arabic speaking countries. The ethnic differences in most cases do not seem to be explained satisfactorily by education, economic stress or possibly unemployment.
PubMed ID
15652685 View in PubMed
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Health perceptions of local community works: network women describe how flows of energy and space of action generate health and ill health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51861
Source
Work. 2005;24(3):215-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Susanne Gustafsson-Larsson
Anne Hammarström
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 85 Umeå Sweden. susanne.gustafsson-larsson@mam.mh.se
Source
Work. 2005;24(3):215-27
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Networks
Consumer Participation - psychology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
This paper presents a theoretical model on how flows of energy and space of action generate health and ill health in a local community work. Local community work was assessed through a case study of women's networks in a peripheral region of northern Sweden. The aim of the study was to analyse what participation in women's networks can mean for the members health perceptions. A purposeful selection of women's networks was made for the purpose of carrying out a qualitative follow-up study. Grounded theory was used to analyse the data and to generate a theoretical model. The meaning of participation in networks proved to be plural, as both health-deteriorating and health-promotive mechanisms were found. Two core categories "flows of energy" and "a space of action" as well as the four ancillary categories: social relations within the network; increased awareness of gender and power; becoming visible; and material prerequisites for networking were grounded in the data. We suggest that under certain circumstances local community work can be of crucial importance for health promotion.
PubMed ID
15912012 View in PubMed
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The impact of market oriented reforms on choice and information: a case study of cataract surgery in outer London and Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72363
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 May;48(10):1415-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
M. Fotaki
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Policy and Administration, London School of Economics and Political Sciences, UK. m.fotaki@lse.ac.uk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1999 May;48(10):1415-32
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cataract Extraction - economics - standards
Comparative Study
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Economic Competition
Female
Health Care Reform
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
London
Male
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Advocacy
Patient satisfaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sweden
Abstract
In the early 1990s, a set of market-oriented reforms was introduced into health care systems of the UK and Sweden, two exemplary cases of reliance on planned budgeting and integrated provision of services. In the pursuit of increased efficiency, several County Councils in Sweden have followed the public competition model, while in the UK internal market reforms were introduced. It was expected that the separation of functions of planners and purchasers from those of providers, which were to be freely chosen by the former, would achieve higher allocative efficiency but also enhance users' satisfaction with care. This paper uses cataract surgery as a case study to trace the impact of competition among providers on choice and information. Qualitative research methods were employed to record the perception of changes in their type and amount as it was given to both purchasers and patients. A set of open ended and standardised questionnaires was designed to elicit the views of all actors involved and to measure the likely transformations. Four study sites from Outer London were selected representing the diversity of responses, and the only existing large provider of eye services to Stockholm County Council was used. The analysis of the data showed that the quasi-market reforms have resulted in a change of attitude of providers. Some improvements in the amount and type of information given to purchasers and patients could also be detected, although as far as direct users were concerned, the demand has not been fully satisfied. However, the impact on choice available to patients and purchasers alike seemed to be adverse, an effect that was particularly strong in the UK case.
PubMed ID
10369441 View in PubMed
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Individual and neighbourhood determinants of social participation and social capital: a multilevel analysis of the city of Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19016
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jun;54(12):1779-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Martin Lindström
Juan Merlo
Per-Olof Ostergren
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health, University Hospital MAS, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. martin.lindstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jun;54(12):1779-91
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Social Adjustment
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of neighbourhood on individual social capital (measured as social participation). The study population consisted of 14,390 individuals aged 45-73 that participated in the Malmö diet and cancer study in 1992-1994, residing in 90 neighbourhoods of Malmö, Sweden (population 250,000). A multilevel logistic regression model, with individuals at the first level and neighbourhoods at the second level, was performed. The study analysed the effect (intra-area correlation and cross-level modification) of the neighbourhood on individual social capital after adjustment for compositional factors (e.g. age, sex, educational level, occupational status, disability pension, living alone, sick leave, unemployment) and, finally, one contextual migration factor. The prevalence of low social participation varied from 23.0% to 39.7% in the first and third neighbourhood quartiles, respectively. Neighbourhood factors accounted for 6.3% of the total variance in social participation, and this effect was reduced but not eliminated when adjusting for all studied variables (-73%), especially the occupational composition of the neighbourhoods (-58%). The contextual migration variable further reduced the variance in social participation at the neighbourhood level to some extent. Our study supports Putnam's notion that social capital, which is suggested to be an important factor for population health and possibly for health equity, is an aspect that is partly contextual in its nature.
PubMed ID
12113435 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.