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33 records – page 1 of 4.

An introduction to the framework project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207737
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
J E Till
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto. till@oci.utoronto.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Consumer Participation
Decision Making
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics
Female
Health planning
Health Priorities
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - prevention & control - therapy
Palliative Care
Population Surveillance
Program Development
Research
Smoking - prevention & control
Social Responsibility
Abstract
The framework project of the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control (ACOCC), National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), was based on the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework for bridging the gap between research and action. The project was carried out under the auspices of the Sociobehavioural Cancer Research Network (SCRN) of the NCIC. It focused on 3 research areas of cancer control research: smoking control, palliative care and screening for breast cancer. In this introductory paper, the criteria and methodology used for the framework project are described, the main features of the framework are outlined and the definitions of terms used in the framework are summarized. It was expected that the framework project would lead to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework. The project was also expected to assist the SCRN in its ongoing efforts to develop and refine an action-oriented research agenda.
PubMed ID
9765744 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Nancy Cavanaugh
Kaats Saa Waa Della Cheney
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, USA.
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Health Care Coalitions
Health status
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Public Health Administration
State Government
Abstract
This article describes the collaborative efforts of the Sitka Turning Point Towards Health partnership in Sitka, Alaska. Key steps to its success include defining our terms, finding consensus, maintaining an attitude of respect, engaging people--building relationships, creating work groups, sharing leadership, committing to collaborative leadership, building in sustainability, and telling our story. We have chosen to interlace a weaving metaphor to reflect our Alaskan Native American culture and the vision of our partnership.
Notes
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):34-511789035
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):36-811789036
PubMed ID
11789032 View in PubMed
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Community participation in Quebec's health system: a strategy to curtail community empowerment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224645
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1992;22(2):287-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. O'Neill
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1992;22(2):287-301
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Centers - organization & administration - trends
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Governing Board
Health promotion
Humans
Politics
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Quebec
Abstract
Since the beginning of the 1970s, the province of Quebec has undergone a major reform of its health and social services system. Following this reform, the state has become a major protagonist, and the participation of the population is a built-in element in the system, guaranteed by law. Now, about 20 years later, there is a major effort to reorganize health services, in the wake of a "dewelfarization" mood that has reached Canada and Quebec. This article reviews the successes and pitfalls of public participation in Quebec's health system, presents the way in which participation is dealt with in current reform proposals, and draws lessons for people in many countries who have recently been encouraged to jump onto the bandwagon of participation as a strategy to promote the health of populations.
PubMed ID
1601547 View in PubMed
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Developing guidelines for quality community health nursing clinical placements for baccalaureate nursing students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138261
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2011;8:Article 23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marie A Dietrich Leurer
Donna Meagher-Stewart
Benita E Cohen
Patricia M Seaman
Sherri Buhler
Morag Granger
Heather Pattullo
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan. marie.dietrichleurer@usask.ca
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2011;8:Article 23
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education
Consumer Participation
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Needs Assessment
Preceptorship - standards
Program Development
Abstract
Rapidly increasing enrollment in Canadian schools of nursing has triggered the development of innovative clinical placement sites. There are both opportunities and challenges inherent in the delivery of clinical nursing education in diverse community settings. As part of the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing's (CASN) ongoing work to assist its members and ensure baccalaureate graduates are prepared to meet the Canadian Community Health Nursing Standards of Practice at an entry-to-practice level, the CASN Sub-Committee on Public Health (funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada) conducted extensive national consultations with representatives from both academic and practice settings, as well as key national organizations. The resultant Guidelines for Quality Community Health Nursing Clinical Placements, released by CASN in 2010, aim to provide direction to Canadian schools of nursing and practice settings in addressing the challenges and opportunities arising from the changing context of community health nursing student clinical placements.
PubMed ID
22718669 View in PubMed
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Developing rural communities' capacity for palliative care: a conceptual model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159895
Source
J Palliat Care. 2007;23(3):143-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Mary Lou Kelley
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Centre for Education and Research on Aging and Health, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2007;23(3):143-53
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Planning
Consumer Participation
Focus Groups
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Program Development
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
The population in Canada and other developing countries is aging, increasing the need for palliative care services. In rural communities, care of dying people is normally provided by health care professionals as part of a generalist practice, not by palliative care specialists. Despite a lack of specialists and resources, some rural communities have developed local palliative care programs. The goal of this research was to conceptualize rural communities' process of developing palliative care programs using a theoretical perspective of community capacity development. Data were from nine focus groups of interdisciplinary rural health care providers who provided palliative care in seven provinces/territories of Canada. The outcome is a theoretical model that conceptualizes the process of developing palliative care programs in four sequential phases: antecedent community conditions, a catalyst, creating the team, and growing the program. The activities of each phase are outlined. This research offers practical and theoretical knowledge to guide practitioners and planners seeking to develop palliative care programs in other rural communities.
PubMed ID
18069435 View in PubMed
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Developing the health promotion knowledge of the municipalities in South-Savo County in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167857
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 Sep;14(6):490-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Sirpa Luukkainen
Author Affiliation
Mikkeli Polytechnic, Campus of Health Care, Savonlinna, Finland. sirpa.luukkainen@mikkeliamk.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2006 Sep;14(6):490-3
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Decision Making, Organizational
Finland
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Knowledge
Local Government
Models, organizational
Population Surveillance
Program Development
Regional Medical Programs - organization & administration
Abstract
Health determinants are not only biology and genetic endowment, but also income and social status, education, employment and working conditions, physical environment, social support networks, healthy childhood development, health services and personal health practices and coping skills. Successful health promotion means working together with local and regional authorities and politicians in every administrative sector in firm cooperation with health education, health professionals and local residents. The project for developing health promotion knowledge in management and decision-making contributes to the requirements of partnership working.
PubMed ID
16919127 View in PubMed
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The development and implementation of a revised municipal bylaw to control environmental tobacco smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221613
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Brigden
S H Peck
P. Coy
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Education, Capital Regional District Health, Victoria, B.C.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):118-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Humans
Local Government
Politics
Program Development
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Relations
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Urban health
Abstract
A bylaw to regulate the contamination of the environment by tobacco smoke was introduced in the Capital Regional District, Victoria, British Columbia as of January 1st, 1991. This smoking control bylaw rigorously limits smoking in all public premises and restricts size, ventilation and location of designated smoking areas. As of January 1st, 1992 all workplaces in this area have become completely smoke-free. This paper describes the process of developing and implementing a municipal smoking control bylaw. Publicity is essential to raise awareness of the issue and to provide information. Engendering of political and public support and the adoption of an appropriate time line for introduction of the bylaw are also important components of the process. Legislation to control tobacco use has been shown to be an effective component of a comprehensive tobacco reduction strategy. Public health officials are urged to consider the implementation of similar policies to combat the health risks posed by environmental tobacco smoke.
PubMed ID
8334603 View in PubMed
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Development of a culturally appropriate, home-based nutrition and physical activity curriculum for Wisconsin American Indian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161262
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2007 Oct;4(4):A109
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tara L LaRowe
Deborah P Wubben
Kate A Cronin
SuAnne M Vannatter
Alexandra K Adams
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 777 South Mills Street, Madison, WI 53714, USA. tara.larowe@fammed.wisc.edu
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2007 Oct;4(4):A109
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Community Health Workers - education
Consumer Participation
Curriculum
Exercise
Food Habits
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Life Style
Obesity - ethnology - prevention & control
Program Development
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Wisconsin
Abstract
We designed an obesity prevention intervention for American Indian families called Healthy Children, Strong Families using a participatory approach involving three Wisconsin tribes. Healthy Children, Strong Families promotes healthy eating and physical activity for preschool children and their caregivers while respecting each community's cultural and structural framework. Academic researchers, tribal wellness staff, and American Indian community mentors participated in development of the Healthy Children, Strong Families educational curriculum. The curriculum is based on social cognitive and family systems theories as well as on community eating and activity patterns with adaptation to American Indian cultural values. The curricular materials, which were delivered through a home-based mentoring model, have been successfully received and are being modified so that they can be tailored to individual family needs. The curriculum can serve as a nutrition and physical activity model for health educators that can be adapted for other American Indian preschool children and their families or as a model for development of a culturally specific curriculum.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17875253 View in PubMed
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Development of the Northern Plains Native Family Cancer Caregiver Education Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124434
Source
J Palliat Care. 2012;28(1):52-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Leah Frerichs
Karen Schumacher
Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway
Florence Duran
Author Affiliation
University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion, Social and Behavioral Health, 984365 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-4365, USA. leah.frerichs@unmc.edu
Source
J Palliat Care. 2012;28(1):52-9
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Consumer Participation
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Neoplasms - therapy
Palliative Care
Program Development
United States
PubMed ID
22582473 View in PubMed
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Drug mishap reporting system created for consumers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142223
Source
CMAJ. 2010 Aug 10;182(11):E515-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2010

33 records – page 1 of 4.