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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Beyond "bad manners": the power relations of "consumer participation" in Ontario's community mental health system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209052
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
K. Church
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1996;15(2):27-44
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Ontario
Patient Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient satisfaction
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
This article describes the work of the legislation subcommittee of the steering committee responsible for the implementation of the Graham Report, Ontario's current blueprint for community mental health. It describes barriers to psychiatric survivor participation in the subcommittee's 1990 provincial consultation, including professional/bureaucratic characterization of survivor actions during the event as "bad manners." I argue that this naming is an act of power. Conflicts arose because the two groups operate from different behavioural codes in which the pivotal issue, acted out indirectly in all kinds of interactions, was whether and how deeply to include personal experience and emotions as forms of knowledge. The cultural dimensions of "consumer participation" must be more broadly recognized and more consciously considered if this policy is to remain viable, particularly in a time of major economic restructuring.
PubMed ID
10166895 View in PubMed
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Citizen participation in health decision-making: past experience and future prospects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190185
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(1):12-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
John Church
Duncan Saunders
Margaret Wanke
Raymond Pong
Carol Spooner
Marlene Dorgan
Source
J Public Health Policy. 2002;23(1):12-32
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Decision Making, Organizational
Government
Health Care Reform
Health Planning Organizations
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Policy Making
Politics
Power (Psychology)
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Every couple of decades governments decide that they need to involve citizens more in public decision-making processes. The significant changes that have occurred over the past decade, including a growing loss of faith in the traditional institutions of government, have once again prompted political decision-makers to explore options for enhanced citizen participation. In the health care sector, reforms occurring during the 1990s were couched in terms such as "enhanced responsiveness," "improved accountability," and "increased citizen participation." In the new millennium, governments and regional health authorities have been relatively silent on this issue. As has been the case in the past, a wide range of opinions exist about what citizen participation is and how governments should proceed. Without either conceptual clarity or practical direction, governments have been slow to articulate what they hope to achieve or how they intend to get there. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of citizen participation within the context of a series of basic questions from which decision-makers might draw some policy relevance. Rather than taking a particular disciplinary perspective (i.e. health promotion), the authors have chosen to review a broad spectrum of existing literature to provide a better understanding of what is known about citizen participation, both good and bad. As such, the paper is meant to be a point of departure for an informed discussion of the possibilities for improved citizen participation in health (care) decision-making.
PubMed ID
12013713 View in PubMed
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Community and professional empowerment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231111
Source
Can Nurse. 1989 Mar;85(3):22-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989

Community-based research as a tool for empowerment: the Haida Gwaii Diabetes Project example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3199
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):109-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
C P Herbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Mar-Apr;87(2):109-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Health Aides - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - prevention & control
Faculty, Medical - organization & administration
Family Practice - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Interinstitutional Relations
Power (Psychology)
Research - organization & administration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The evolution of the Haida Gwaii Diabetes Project exemplifies how community-based family practice research can be a tool for empowerment for both the community of research participants and the community based members of the research team. The aims of the project are to develop a better understanding of Haida beliefs about diabetes; to develop culturally sensitive approaches to prevention and management; and to attempt to apply this understanding to the development of a model for preventive health for native people in the province of British Columbia. A participatory research paradigm, coupled with explicit working principles by which the research team agreed to operate, addressed the concerns that the Aboriginal community had about the risks of research. A true working partnership has developed among all members of the research team, and with the Haida community.
PubMed ID
8753639 View in PubMed
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Community development: theoretical and practical issues for community health nursing in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210967
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1996 Oct;24(4):719-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
K I Chalmers
I J Bramadat
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1996 Oct;24(4):719-26
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health education
Health promotion
Humans
Job Description
Models, Economic
Models, Nursing
Nursing Research
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
Despite the importance currently given to community development as an increasingly significant role for community nurses, there is little analysis of the role in the nursing literature. This paper provides background information on the historical origins of community development work through an extensive review of the literature. As well, four models of community development are synthesised from literature in sociology, social psychology, education and political science. These include economic development models, education models both formal and informal, confrontational models, and empowerment models. Each is discussed, and the relevance for community health nursing practice is critiqued. Finally, issues which may arise when community health nurses attempt to practice within a community development model are discussed. Issues are examined related to the structures of organizations in which nurses work, characteristics of nurses themselves, and the communities which nurses serve. The argument is advanced that despite the pitfalls and problems, this new role shows promise as an important mechanism for community health nurses to promote the community's health. However, much additional work will be needed to test out models for community development in actual practice. Evaluation of the role will also be important to determine the degree to which it can be implemented and the resultant health outcomes for the population.
PubMed ID
8894889 View in PubMed
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Community, empowerment, and resilience: paths to wellness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192944
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2001;20(1):21-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
S. Cadell
J. Karabanow
M. Sanchez
Author Affiliation
Wilfrid Laurier University.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2001;20(1):21-35
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Community Health Planning
Consumer Participation
HIV Infections
Health promotion
Homeless Youth - psychology
Humans
Power (Psychology)
Prisoners - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
In this paper, we explore 3 diverse populations: street kids, political prisoners, and caregivers of people with HIV/AIDS. From these explorations, we consider the concepts of empowerment, resilience, and community-building. By interweaving these 3 key concepts, we develop a cyclical wellness model which can be applied equally to individuals and communities. This model highlights the strengths of individuals and communities and will, we believe, provide a critical element of hope to societies within our increasingly global economy.
PubMed ID
11599134 View in PubMed
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Community empowerment: the alternative resources movement in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219710
Source
Community Ment Health J. 1993 Dec;29(6):535-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
C. Rousseau
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Unit, Douglas Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 1993 Dec;29(6):535-46
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Community Psychiatry - trends
Consumer Participation - trends
Continuity of Patient Care - trends
Forecasting
Health Resources - trends
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Power (Psychology)
Quebec
Rehabilitation, Vocational - trends
Social Support
Abstract
In order to achieve true community participation in mental health care, a redistribution of decision-making power is needed. Currently, this power is almost exclusively in the hands of psychiatric institutions and the state. Community participation would require greater representation from community organizations. This paper describes the history of the alternative resources movement in Quebec. This movement has challenged the health care system and promoted innovative therapeutic approaches. In this process, community organizations have been faced with the difficult task of gaining more power while maintaining strong links with the communities they serve.
PubMed ID
8275676 View in PubMed
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Community participation in Quebec's health system: a strategy to curtail community empowerment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224645
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1992;22(2):287-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
M. O'Neill
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1992;22(2):287-301
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Centers - organization & administration - trends
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Governing Board
Health promotion
Humans
Politics
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Quebec
Abstract
Since the beginning of the 1970s, the province of Quebec has undergone a major reform of its health and social services system. Following this reform, the state has become a major protagonist, and the participation of the population is a built-in element in the system, guaranteed by law. Now, about 20 years later, there is a major effort to reorganize health services, in the wake of a "dewelfarization" mood that has reached Canada and Quebec. This article reviews the successes and pitfalls of public participation in Quebec's health system, presents the way in which participation is dealt with in current reform proposals, and draws lessons for people in many countries who have recently been encouraged to jump onto the bandwagon of participation as a strategy to promote the health of populations.
PubMed ID
1601547 View in PubMed
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Consumer participation in cancer system planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216210
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(4):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
R. Gray
M. Fitch
M. Greenberg
S. Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(4):27-33
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Female
Health Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
PubMed ID
8648519 View in PubMed
Less detail

33 records – page 1 of 4.