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Accident prevention activities in the Norwegian municipalities: the local response to a nationwide campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36240
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
F. Thuen
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adult
Child
Consumer Participation - trends
Health Education - trends
Health Plan Implementation
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Abstract
The Norwegian "Campaign Against Home Accidents" was launched nationwide during 1988 to 1991, with the goal of reducing the incidence of home accidents by 20%. The aim of the campaign was to urge primarily the municipal health services to form local accident prevention groups and to implement local measures for prevention of home accidents. On the basis of two surveys, after one year and at the end of the national campaign, an evaluation was carried out concerning the participation of the municipal health services in the campaign and the impact of the campaign on local accident prevention activities. The results indicate that the national campaign engaged the majority of the municipalities and stimulated local accident prevention work to some extent. Most local activities were health education measures, whereas environmental intervention were less commonly reported. Involvement in the campaign was the variable most related to level of accident prevention activities at the end of the campaign period. However, the relationship was only modest. Restricted economical resources, too little emphasis on environmental change, lack of political involvement and insufficient use of coalition partners at the community level are suggested as the major explanations for the limited effect of the campaign.
PubMed ID
8367680 View in PubMed
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Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256617
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Maggie Mort
Celia Roberts
Blanca Callén
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Aged
Aging - psychology
Coercion
Consumer Participation
Economic Recession
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Spain
Telemedicine - instrumentation - standards - utilization
Abstract
In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.
PubMed ID
23094945 View in PubMed
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A community-based prevention program in western Norway. Organisation and progression model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188245
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Nov-Dec;27(6):977-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arvid Skutle
Erik Iversen
Tone Bergan
Author Affiliation
Bergen Clinics Foundation, Norway. bergenclinics@bergenclinics.hl.no
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Nov-Dec;27(6):977-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health Planning Councils
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Local Government
Models, organizational
Norway
Politics
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper presents the organisation, progression, and main findings from a community-based substance use prevention project in five municipalities in western Norway. At the central level, this project was organised with a steering committee and a principal project leader, who is situated at the Department of Health and Social Welfare at the county level. Locally, the way of organizing differed, as one would expect from the community-based model. Top-down/bottom-up strategies can apply both in the way a community organises its efforts, as well as in the relationship between the central project organisation and the participating local communities. It is argued that it can be beneficial for the success of community action programs if one attains a "good mix" between top-down and bottom-up strategies. Factors of importance for such "mix" in the Hordaland project were that the municipalities applied for participation, the availability of economic funding, the venues for meetings between central and local project management, the position of local coordinators, the possibilities for coupling project work to otherwise existing community planning, and the extent of formal bureaucracy.
PubMed ID
12369479 View in PubMed
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Consumer involvement in dietary guideline development: opinions from European stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118665
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):769-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Kerry A Brown
Maria Hermoso
Lada Timotijevic
Julie Barnett
Inger Therese L Lillegaard
Irena Rehurková
Ainhoa Larrañaga
Azra Loncarevic-Srmic
Lene Frost Andersen
Jirí Ruprich
Laura Fernández-Celemín
Monique M Raats
Author Affiliation
Food Consumer Behaviour and Health Research Centre, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. kerry.brown@surrey.ac.uk
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2013 May;16(5):769-76
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Czech Republic
Decision Making
Diet - standards
Germany
Great Britain
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Norway
Recommended dietary allowances
Serbia
Spain
Abstract
The involvement of consumers in the development of dietary guidelines has been promoted by national and international bodies. Yet, few best practice guidelines have been established to assist with such involvement.
Qualitative semi-structured interviews explored stakeholders' beliefs about consumer involvement in dietary guideline development.
Interviews were conducted in six European countries: the Czech Republic, Germany, Norway, Serbia, Spain and the UK.
Seventy-seven stakeholders were interviewed. Stakeholders were grouped as government, scientific advisory body, professional and academic, industry or non-government organisations. Response rate ranged from 45 % to 95 %.
Thematic analysis was conducted with the assistance of NVivo qualitative software. Analysis identified two main themes: (i) type of consumer involvement and (ii) pros and cons of consumer involvement. Direct consumer involvement (e.g. consumer organisations) in the decision-making process was discussed as a facilitator to guideline communication towards the end of the process. Indirect consumer involvement (e.g. consumer research data) was considered at both the beginning and the end of the process. Cons to consumer involvement included the effect of vested interests on objectivity; consumer disinterest; and complications in terms of time, finance and technical understanding. Pros related to increased credibility and trust in the process.
Stakeholders acknowledged benefits to consumer involvement during the development of dietary guidelines, but remained unclear on the advantage of direct contributions to the scientific content of guidelines. In the absence of established best practice, clarity on the type and reasons for consumer involvement would benefit all actors.
PubMed ID
23182406 View in PubMed
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Consumer involvement in seafood as family meals in Norway: an application of the expectancy-value approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195456
Source
Appetite. 2001 Apr;36(2):173-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S O Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Science and Marketing, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Appetite. 2001 Apr;36(2):173-86
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Aged
Animals
Attitude
Consumer Participation - psychology
Diet Surveys
Eating
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Seafood
Social Environment
Social Responsibility
Abstract
A theoretical model of involvement in consumption of food products was tested in a representative survey of Norwegian households for the particular case of consuming seafood as a common family meal. The empirical study is based on using structural equation approach to test construct validity of measures and the empirical fit of the theoretical model. Attitudes, negative feelings, social norms and moral obligation were proved to be important, reliable and different constructs and explained 63% of the variation in seafood involvement. Negative feelings and moral obligation was the most important antecedents of involvement. Both our proposed model and modified model with seafood involvement as a mediator fit well with the data and proved our expectations in a promising way.
PubMed ID
11237353 View in PubMed
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The dimensions of 'traditional food' in reflexive modernity: Norway as a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108393
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Nov;93(14):3455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Virginie Amilien
Atle Wehn Hegnes
Author Affiliation
SIFO-The National Institute for Consumer Research, P.B. 4682 Nydalen, N-0405, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Sci Food Agric. 2013 Nov;93(14):3455-63
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooking
Culture
Data Collection - methods
Diet - trends
Food - classification
Food Industry - trends
Humans
Norway
Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This article aims to better understand the definition(s) of 'traditional' food. The authors discuss and exemplify how this rhetorical concept is used in the specialist literature and in Norwegian public debate. The authors ultimately propose a set of central dimensions of traditional food and their relevance across various discourses.
After examining the use of the concept 'tradition' in scientific publications, the authors note that it is based on two main axes: time and know-how. These are interwoven in a 'meaning' dimension in the connection between time and culture, but also in a 'place' dimension that is systematically materialised in food. In order to better describe and understand the dynamic that emerges from the interplay of innovation and tradition, the article goes through the broadest use of 'traditional food' in public discourses, in national and regional newspapers, and in consumers' attitudes. There, the concept of 'traditional food' is used for both preserving historic values and renewing sense of identity.
The article can be regarded as an empirical example which elaborates the understanding of tradition in reflexive modernity. It concludes that the concept of traditional food is neither fixed nor finite but is a fluid and energetic concept which, based on the tensions between four central axes, can adapt to the discourses of preservation, moderation and innovation.
PubMed ID
23893890 View in PubMed
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Documentation of and satisfaction with the service delivery process of electric powered scooters among adult users in different national contexts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122547
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2013 Mar;8(2):151-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Terje Sund
Susanne Iwarsson
Mette C Andersen
Åse Brandt
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Labour and Welfare Service, Department of Assistive Technology, Oslo, Norway. terje.sund@nav.no
Source
Disabil Rehabil Assist Technol. 2013 Mar;8(2):151-60
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Documentation
Electricity
Female
Humans
Internationality
Linear Models
Male
Marketing - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Quality Control
Questionnaires
Self-Help Devices - statistics & numerical data
Statistics, nonparametric
Wheelchairs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate how different service delivery systems for assistive devices were associated with the service delivery process (SDP) and user satisfaction in two national contexts when electric powered scooters were provided.
The study had a follow-up design based on a consecutive inclusion of 50 Danish and 86 Norwegian adults as they were about to be provided a scooter. A study-specific structured questionnaire for documentation of the SDP was administered. The Satisfaction with Assistive Technology Services was used for documenting user satisfaction with the SDP. Besides descriptive statistics, regression analysis was used to identify contributors of variance and predictors of user satisfaction.
The various steps of the SDP were carried out to a various degree. Significantly more total time was spent in the SDP in the Danish sample (p
PubMed ID
22804870 View in PubMed
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Do local inhabitants want to participate in community injury prevention?: a focus on the significance of local identities for community participation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34178
Source
Health Educ Res. 1997 Sep;12(3):333-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
O. Nilsen
P. Kraft
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Health Educ Res. 1997 Sep;12(3):333-45
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child
Consumer Participation
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
During the 1980s the community became the object of new interest and enthusiasm among many health promotion practitioners and researchers, and the principle of community participation was put on the research agenda. However, recent evaluations of major community health promotion programs have questioned the value of community interventions. This paper argues that the community level need not be of less importance in future health promotion initiatives. It is discussed whether the cultural dimension and the significance of local identities, neglected in most community health promotion programs, should receive more attention when local inhabitants are invited to participate in health promotion or disease prevention activities. Results from a study of injury prevention projects in small Norwegian municipalities indicate that the inhabitants' identification with local spatial subarenas might play an important role when they decide to become involved in injury prevention. Contemporary sociological approaches to the community, focusing on developments of local identities in processes of globalization, have formed a theoretical frame of reference in this study.
PubMed ID
10174216 View in PubMed
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Early menopause, association with tobacco smoking, coffee consumption and other lifestyle factors: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162595
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:149
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Thea F Mikkelsen
Sidsel Graff-Iversen
Johanne Sundby
Espen Bjertness
Author Affiliation
Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. theam@studmed.uio.no
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:149
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Coffee - adverse effects
Consumer Participation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Life Style
Menopause, Premature - drug effects
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Norway
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
Early onset of menopause is a risk factor for several health problems. The objective was primarily to investigate the association between early menopause and current, past active and passive smoking. A second aim was to investigate the association between coffee and alcohol consumption and early menopause.
The present population-based cross-sectional study included a sub-sample of 2123 postmenopausal women born in 1940-41 who participated in the Oslo Health Study. Early menopause was defined as menopause occurring at an age of less than 45 years. We applied logistic regression analyses (crude and adjusted odds ratio (OR)) to examine the association between early menopause and selected lifestyle factors.
Current smoking was significantly associated with early menopause (adj. OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.11-2.28). Stopping smoking more than 10 years before menopause considerably reduced the risk of early menopause (adj. OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.05-0.33). Total exposure to smoking (the product of number of cigarettes per day and time as a smoker) was positively related to early menopause and, at the highest doses, nearly doubled the odds (adj. OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.12-3.30). These data suggest a possible dose-response relationship between total exposure to smoking and early menopause, but no dose-response relationship was detected for the other variables examined. We found no significant association of coffee or alcohol consumption with early menopause. Of the lifestyle factors tested, high educational level (adj. OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34-0.72) and high social participation (adj. OR, 0.60, 95% CI, 0.39-0.98) were negatively associated with early menopause.
This cross-sectional study shows an association between current smoking and early menopause. The data also suggest that the earlier a woman stops smoking the more protected she is from early menopause. Early menopause was not significantly associated with passive smoking, or alcohol or coffee consumption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17617919 View in PubMed
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Equality, explicitness, severity, and rigidity: the Oregon plan evaluated from a Scandinavian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217616
Source
J Med Philos. 1994 Aug;19(4):343-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
L F Hansson
O F Norheim
K W Ruyter
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Ethics, University of Oslo.
Source
J Med Philos. 1994 Aug;19(4):343-66
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Costs and Cost Analysis
Government Regulation
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Priorities
Hospitals, Private - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Individuality
Internationality
Norway
Oregon
Patient Advocacy
Patient Selection
Resource Allocation
Social Justice
Social Values
State Health Plans - standards
United States
Vulnerable Populations
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
This article is an attempt to evaluate the Oregon plan from the perspective of a Scandinavian national health care system. The Nordic welfare states are marked by a strong emphasis on equality. As an example of an egalitarian system we present the Norwegian health care model in part one. In part two, the arguments in favor of a one tier system in Norway are presented and compared to Oregon's two tier system. Although we argue, in part three, that a comparison of the degree of explicitness in the prioritization process shows that Norway has much to learn from Oregon, we do believe that the Norwegian system has some attractive elements that may function as an important corrective. In part four we present the Norwegian Guidelines for priority-setting and discuss the weight assigned to the severity of disease criterion. It is argued that the exclusion of information about the severity of disease partly explains the counterintuitive ranking of treatment-condition pairs in Oregon's initial method based on the principle of health maximization. A normative analysis of the conflicting norms of efficiency and equality of results is called for. The final part of the paper is devoted to the problem of rigidity. Henry J. Aaron has argued that the Oregon system is insensitive to inter-individual variations within each diagnosis-treatment pair. This objection is a severe one, since the system might end up treating patients unfairly on the individual level. To overcome this problem, we suggest a selection rule that should be more capable of dealing with the problem of rigidity.
PubMed ID
7996073 View in PubMed
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36 records – page 1 of 4.