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Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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Balancing empiricism and local cultural knowledge in the design of prevention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174453
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Philip A Fisher
Thomas J Ball
Author Affiliation
Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR 97401-2426, USA. philf@oslc.org
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Empirical Research
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Models, organizational
Primary Prevention - methods - organization & administration
Research Design
Abstract
Prevention research aims to address health and social problems via systematic strategies for affecting and documenting change. To produce meaningful and lasting results at the level of the community, prevention research frequently requires investigators to reevaluate the boundaries that have traditionally separated them from the subjects of their investigations. New tools and techniques are required to facilitate collaboration between researchers and communities while maintaining scientific rigor. This article describes the tribal participatory research approach, which was developed to facilitate culturally centered prevention research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This approach is discussed within the broader context of community-based participatory research, an increasingly prevalent paradigm in the prevention field. Strengths and limitations of the approach used in the study are presented.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15933330 View in PubMed
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The best laid schemes of mice and men... ParticipACTION's legacy and the future of physical activity promotion in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179220
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95 Suppl 2:S37-42
Publication Type
Article

Big changes in the Indian Health Service: are nurses aware?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192011
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Patricia A Holkup
Author Affiliation
University of Iowa College of Nursing, USA.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):47-53
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Consumer Participation
Cost Control
Cultural Diversity
Decision Making, Organizational
Forecasting
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Managed Care Programs - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment
Nurses - psychology
Transcultural Nursing
United States
United States Indian Health Service - organization & administration
Abstract
Unparalleled challenges currently face the Native American health care system. These challenges are a result of several factors, including (a) external pressures to reduce the overall cost of health care in the United States, (b) increased assumption of responsibility for delivery of health care by tribal governments, (c) decreased direct supervision by the Indian Health Service (IHS), (d) insufficient funding for Indian health care, and (e) increased interest of managed care to contract with tribal service units for health care. This article explores the opportunities and challenges facing Native American health care delivery and examines nursing policy issues pertinent to the current state of the IHS.
PubMed ID
11776015 View in PubMed
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The "Canadian model" in the international context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184894
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Hirschfeld
Author Affiliation
Long-Term Care, World Health Organization, Geneva,Switzerland.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Developing Countries
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Internationality
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Poverty
Technology Transfer
World Health Organization
Abstract
The focus of this commentary is on the relevance of the Canadian experience for developing countries. It highlights the growing urgency poor countries face in preserving their major human and social capital--community solidarity and family care. Developing countries face a double burden of disease--communicable and non-communicable diseases alike, with very few, and often shrinking, resources. While poorer countries will be able to learn about the essential elements of home-based care from the examples of Canada and other industrialized countries, they do need to develop their own systems based upon their economic, social, political and cultural realities. The primary health care system would seem to provide a foundation for the provision of long-term care on a sustainable and cost-effective basis. In contrast to the often-prevailing practice in developed countries, home-based care services could be integrated into the overall health and social system. Functional disability, regardless of disease aetiology or age of the care recipient, as well as the needs of family caregivers would thus become the defining elements of service eligibility. While the question remains open as to how much poor countries can learn from the experience of others, developing countries do have the opportunity to initiate a rational process where they first provide support to communities and informal caregivers and help to maintain patients in their homes and only later develop other service elements.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2000 Fall;1(4):9-3612811170
PubMed ID
12811182 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular health in Canadian women: the bigger picture revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171903
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2005;15(3):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jo-Ann V Sawatzky
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. joanne_sawatzky@umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2005;15(3):53-62
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Educational Status
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Forecasting
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health planning
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Nurse's Role
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Social Support
Social Values
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's health
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in Canadian women. Recent projections suggest that the number of cardiovascular-related deaths among women will continue to increase for at least another decade (Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2003). Nurses are in pivotal roles to facilitate the development of strategies to promote cardiovascular health and prevent CVD in this population. These strategies must move beyond the current focus on the individual, to encompass the bigger picture of population health promotion. This paper revisits the current state of knowledge of the population-based determinants of cardiovascular health in women, incorporates a Canadian perspective by including relevant epidemiological data, and recommends strategies that extend beyond the individual to the broader community, policy, health services and research domains.
PubMed ID
16295798 View in PubMed
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Circles of Support & Accountability: a Canadian national replication of outcome findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147472
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):412-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Robin J Wilson
Franca Cortoni
Andrew J McWhinnie
Author Affiliation
Florida Civil Commitment Center, Arcadia, FL, USA. dr.wilsonrj@verizon.net
Source
Sex Abuse. 2009 Dec;21(4):412-30
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Workers - education - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Deinstitutionalization
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Models, organizational
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pilot Projects
Program Evaluation
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Risk Management
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration
Sex Offenses - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Social Responsibility
Social Support
Abstract
Circles of Support & Accountability (COSA) started 15 years ago in Ontario, Canada, as an alternate means of social support to high-risk sexual offenders released at the end of their sentences without any community supervision. The pilot project in South-Central Ontario has since assisted almost 200 offenders. Projects based on this model are now in place in the United Kingdom, several jurisdictions in the United States, and throughout Canada. Initial research into the efficacy of the COSA pilot project showed that participation reduced sexual recidivism by 70% or more in comparison with both matched controls and actuarial norms. The current study sought to replicate these findings using an independent Canadian national sample. A total of 44 high-risk sexual offenders, released at sentence completion and involved in COSA across Canada, were matched to a group of 44 similar offenders not involved in COSA. The average follow-up time was 35 months. Recidivism was defined as having a charge or conviction for a new offense. Results show that offenders in COSA had an 83% reduction in sexual recidivism, a 73% reduction in all types of violent recidivism, and an overall reduction of 71% in all types of recidivism in comparison to the matched offenders. These findings suggest that participation in COSA is not site-specific and provide further evidence for the position that trained and guided community volunteers can and do assist in markedly improving offenders' chances for successful reintegration.
PubMed ID
19901236 View in PubMed
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Citizen Personas: Exploring Challenges of Citizen-Centric eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277534
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lone Stub Petersen
Pernille Bertelsen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Denmark
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Patient Participation
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Within the field of eHealth, there is a shift towards a patient perspective. However, the focus on the patient often fails to acknowledge and achieve a citizen-centric perspective because there is a lack of understanding of the context and complexities of the person and her relations, interests and activities. In this paper we use the persona of 'Citizen Hanne' for two purposes. Firstly, to highlight and provide detail in the understanding of the citizen perspective and thereby facilitate a shift towards a citizen-centric perspective, which is advanced by many in the field of eHealth. Secondly, we want to further nourish a critical goal of highlighting the challenges in doing citizen-centric eHealth and pointing out the barriers for reaching this goal.
PubMed ID
25991215 View in PubMed
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A community-based prevention program in western Norway. Organisation and progression model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188245
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Nov-Dec;27(6):977-88
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arvid Skutle
Erik Iversen
Tone Bergan
Author Affiliation
Bergen Clinics Foundation, Norway. bergenclinics@bergenclinics.hl.no
Source
Addict Behav. 2002 Nov-Dec;27(6):977-88
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health Planning Councils
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Local Government
Models, organizational
Norway
Politics
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Rural health services - organization & administration
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This paper presents the organisation, progression, and main findings from a community-based substance use prevention project in five municipalities in western Norway. At the central level, this project was organised with a steering committee and a principal project leader, who is situated at the Department of Health and Social Welfare at the county level. Locally, the way of organizing differed, as one would expect from the community-based model. Top-down/bottom-up strategies can apply both in the way a community organises its efforts, as well as in the relationship between the central project organisation and the participating local communities. It is argued that it can be beneficial for the success of community action programs if one attains a "good mix" between top-down and bottom-up strategies. Factors of importance for such "mix" in the Hordaland project were that the municipalities applied for participation, the availability of economic funding, the venues for meetings between central and local project management, the position of local coordinators, the possibilities for coupling project work to otherwise existing community planning, and the extent of formal bureaucracy.
PubMed ID
12369479 View in PubMed
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Community Health Action Model: health promotion by the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155375
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2008;22(3):182-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Frances E Racher
Robert C Annis
Author Affiliation
Brandon University, School of Health Studies, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2008;22(3):182-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Manitoba
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality of Life
Rural health services - organization & administration
Social Identification
Systems Analysis
Trust
Abstract
The goal of the Community Health Action (CHA) model is to depict community health promotion processes in a manner that can be implemented by community members to achieve their collectively and collaboratively determined actions and outcomes to sustain or improve the health and well-being of their community; the community as a whole, for the benefit of all. The model is unique in its ability to merge the community development process with a compatible community assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation framework. The CHA model supports community participation leading to community-engaged assessment and change. In this article, the CHA model is depicted, its genesis described, and its utility demonstrated.
PubMed ID
18763474 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.