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Beyond SARS: ethnic community organization's role in public health -- a Toronto experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153820
Source
Promot Educ. 2008 Dec;15(4):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Weizhen Dong
Author Affiliation
PhD, University of Waterloo, Canada. weizhen@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Promot Educ. 2008 Dec;15(4):53-5
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology
China - ethnology
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Disaster planning
Disease Outbreaks
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Public Health
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
The SARS outbreak in Toronto was a public health crisis. It was particularly frightening to the Chinese-Canadians, because of the origin of the deadly disease. The Chinese-Canadian community organizations launched various activities to help the Chinese-Canadians as well as other Asian-Canadian communities to fight against SARS and its social side-effects. From launching the SARS Supporting Line, distributing health promotional material, disseminating SARS related information, paying tribute to frontline health workers, and promoting local business, to fundraising for SARS related research; they played an active role in easing the public's anxiety, especially for the Chinese-Canadians in the great Toronto area. The culturally diverse population brought problems as well as solutions. Ethnic groups have expertise in almost all areas, including people with leadership skills. The Toronto Chinese community's experience in combating SARS is a good example. The Chinese-Canadian community organizations' activities during the SARS outbreak demonstrate that ethnic minority organizations can play an important role in public health, especially in a public health crisis, and beyond.
PubMed ID
19066240 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for heart health promotion: results of a 5-year experience in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186929
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
David R MacLean
Jane Farquharson
Stephanie Heath
Kari Barkhouse
Celeste Latter
Christine Joffres
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, 5849 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4H7 Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Education
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Nova Scotia
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
To present the outcomes of a capacity-building initiative for heart health promotion.
Follow-up study combining quantitative and qualitative methods.
The Western Health Region of Nova Scotia, Canada.
Twenty organizations, including provincial and municipal agencies and community groups engaged in health, education, and recreation activities.
Two strategies were used for this study: partnership development and organizational development. Partnership development included the creation of multilevel partnerships in diverse sectors. Organizational development included the provision of technical support, action research, community activation, and organizational consultation.
Quantitative data included number and type of partnerships, learning opportunities, community activation initiatives, and organizational changes. Qualitative data included information on the effectiveness of partnerships, organizational consultation, and organizational changes.
Results included the development of 204 intersectoral partnerships, creation of a health promotion clearinghouse, 47 workshops attended by approximately 1400 participants, diverse research products, implementation of 18 community heart health promotion initiatives, and increased organizational capacity for heart health promotion via varied organizational changes, including policy changes, fund reallocations, and enhanced knowledge and practices.
Partnership and organizational development were effective mechanisms for building capacity in heart health promotion. This intervention may have implications for large-scale, community-based, chronic-disease prevention projects.
PubMed ID
12545589 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease prevention in Russia: challenges and opportunities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172489
Source
Public Health. 2006 Jul;120(7):664-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
M. Levintova
Author Affiliation
Institute for Global Health, University of California San Francisco, 74 New Montgomery Street, Ste 508, San Francisco, CA 94105, USA. mlevintova@psg.ucsf.edu
Source
Public Health. 2006 Jul;120(7):664-70
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Female
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Male
Public Opinion
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper examines the challenges that have faced the implementation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention programmes in Russia since the 1980s in two regions of Russia, and identifies opportunities for improving such efforts.
This study used a mixed methods design consisting of archival data review of health-related policy documents and legislation, and key informant interviews.
CVD is the leading cause of death in Russia, with rapid increases in prevalence following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The MONICA, Tacis and CINDI programmes have played major roles in the development of non-communicable and CVD prevention policies and programmes in Russia since the 1980s. These programmes have assisted in policy and guideline development, and programme implementation. However, significant barriers in realizing such policies and sustaining prevention programmes have been encountered.
Numerous barriers exist in developing and implementing CVD prevention programmes in Russia. More government engagement backed by strong public support is necessary in order to sustain and build capacity for CVD prevention in Russia.
PubMed ID
16214186 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular health in Canadian women: the bigger picture revisited.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171903
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2005;15(3):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Jo-Ann V Sawatzky
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. joanne_sawatzky@umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2005;15(3):53-62
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cause of Death
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Educational Status
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Forecasting
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health planning
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Nurse's Role
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Social Support
Social Values
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's health
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in Canadian women. Recent projections suggest that the number of cardiovascular-related deaths among women will continue to increase for at least another decade (Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2003). Nurses are in pivotal roles to facilitate the development of strategies to promote cardiovascular health and prevent CVD in this population. These strategies must move beyond the current focus on the individual, to encompass the bigger picture of population health promotion. This paper revisits the current state of knowledge of the population-based determinants of cardiovascular health in women, incorporates a Canadian perspective by including relevant epidemiological data, and recommends strategies that extend beyond the individual to the broader community, policy, health services and research domains.
PubMed ID
16295798 View in PubMed
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Changing community readiness to prevent the abuse of inhalants and other harmful legal products in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93361
Source
J Community Health. 2008 Aug;33(4):248-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Ogilvie Kristen A
Moore Roland S
Ogilvie Diane C
Johnson Knowlton W
Collins David A
Shamblen Stephen R
Author Affiliation
Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Alaska Office, 4111 Minnesota Drive, Anchorage, AK 99503, USA. kogilvie@pire.org
Source
J Community Health. 2008 Aug;33(4):248-58
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Aerosols
Alaska
Awareness
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community Networks - organization & administration
Consumer Participation - methods
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Abstract
This paper presents results from an application of the Community Readiness Model (CRM) as part of a multi-stage community mobilization strategy to engage community leaders, retailers, parents, and school personnel in preventing youth use of inhalants and other harmful legal products in rural Alaska. The CRM is designed to assess readiness to address a single social problem, based on a limited set of key informant interviews. In this study, researchers conducted 32 baseline and 34 post-intervention community readiness assessment interviews in four rural Alaskan communities. These interviews with key informants from the communities were coded and analyzed using CRM methods to yield readiness scores for each community. The aggregate results were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), and the individual community scores were analyzed in the context of the overall study. Significant positive changes in community readiness were found across six readiness dimensions as well as for the overall readiness score. Variation in the degree of changes in readiness across the four communities is attributed to differences in the intervention's implementation. The implications of these results include the potential for CRM assessments to serve as an integral component of a community mobilization strategy and also to offer meaningful feedback to communities participating in prevention research.
PubMed ID
18392927 View in PubMed
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Citizen Personas: Exploring Challenges of Citizen-Centric eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277534
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lone Stub Petersen
Pernille Bertelsen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Denmark
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Patient Participation
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Within the field of eHealth, there is a shift towards a patient perspective. However, the focus on the patient often fails to acknowledge and achieve a citizen-centric perspective because there is a lack of understanding of the context and complexities of the person and her relations, interests and activities. In this paper we use the persona of 'Citizen Hanne' for two purposes. Firstly, to highlight and provide detail in the understanding of the citizen perspective and thereby facilitate a shift towards a citizen-centric perspective, which is advanced by many in the field of eHealth. Secondly, we want to further nourish a critical goal of highlighting the challenges in doing citizen-centric eHealth and pointing out the barriers for reaching this goal.
PubMed ID
25991215 View in PubMed
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Community-based HIV education and prevention workers respond to a changing environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174734
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):29-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Dale Guenter
Basanti Majumdar
Dennis Willms
Robb Travers
Gina Browne
Greg Robinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):29-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Career Choice
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Prejudice
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to understand the culture, values, skills and activities of staff involved in education and prevention activities in community-based AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) in Ontario, Canada, and to understand the role of evaluation research in their prevention programming. In this qualitative study, 33 staff members from 11 ASOs participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. ASO staff experience tension between a historical grassroots organizational culture characterized by responsiveness and relevance and a more recent culture of professionalization. Target populations have changed from being primarily gay men to an almost unlimited variety of communities. Program emphasis has shifted from education and knowledge dissemination to a broadly based mandate of health promotion, community development, and harm reduction. Integration of evidence of effectiveness, social-behavioral theory, or systematic evaluation is uncommon. Understanding these points of tension is important for the nursing profession when it is engaged with ASOs in programming or evaluation research.
PubMed ID
15903276 View in PubMed
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Community capacity building: a parallel track for health promotion programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189908
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):181-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ronald Labonte
Georgia Bell Woodard
Karen Chad
Glenn Laverack
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU), University of Saskatchewan.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 May-Jun;93(3):181-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
PubMed ID
12050983 View in PubMed
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Community governance of the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project, Kahnawake Territory, Mohawk Nation, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184076
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Sep;18(3):177-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Margaret Cargo
Lucie Lévesque
Ann C Macaulay
Alex McComber
Serge Desrosiers
Treena Delormier
Louise Potvin
Author Affiliation
KSDPP, Kahnawake Territory, Kanien'keh (Mohawk Nation), Québec, Canada. mcargo@total.net
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Sep;18(3):177-87
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advisory Committees
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
School Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
Health promotion emphasizes the importance of community ownership in the governance of community-based programmes, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study examined perceptions of community ownership among project partners taking responsibility for decision-making related to the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). Project partners were surveyed cross-sectionally at 18 months (T1) and 60 months (T2) into the project. The perceived influence of each project partner was assessed at T1 and T2 for three domains: (i) KSDPP activities; (ii) KSDPP operations; and (iii) Community Advisory Board (CAB) activities. Project staff were perceived to have the greatest influence on KSDPP activities, KSDPP operations and CAB activities at both T1 and T2. High mean scores of perceived influence for CAB members and community researchers, however, suggests that project decision-making was a shared responsibility among multiple community partners. Although academic researcher influence was consistently low, they were satisfied with their level of influence. This was unlike community affiliates, who were less satisfied with their lower level of influence. In keeping with Kanien'kehaka (Mohawk) culture, the findings suggest a participatory democracy or shared decision-making as the primary mode of governance of KSDPP.
PubMed ID
12920138 View in PubMed
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Community Health Action Model: health promotion by the community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155375
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2008;22(3):182-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Frances E Racher
Robert C Annis
Author Affiliation
Brandon University, School of Health Studies, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. racher@brandonu.ca
Source
Res Theory Nurs Pract. 2008;22(3):182-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation - methods
Cooperative Behavior
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Manitoba
Models, Nursing
Models, organizational
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Nursing Methodology Research
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality of Life
Rural health services - organization & administration
Social Identification
Systems Analysis
Trust
Abstract
The goal of the Community Health Action (CHA) model is to depict community health promotion processes in a manner that can be implemented by community members to achieve their collectively and collaboratively determined actions and outcomes to sustain or improve the health and well-being of their community; the community as a whole, for the benefit of all. The model is unique in its ability to merge the community development process with a compatible community assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation framework. The CHA model supports community participation leading to community-engaged assessment and change. In this article, the CHA model is depicted, its genesis described, and its utility demonstrated.
PubMed ID
18763474 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.