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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Accomplishment level and satisfaction with social participation of older adults: association with quality of life and best correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144806
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Mélanie Levasseur
Johanne Desrosiers
Gale Whiteneck
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12ième avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, QC, J1H 5N4, Canada. Melanie.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Qual Life Res. 2010 Jun;19(5):665-75
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Mobility Limitation
Motor Activity
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Social Perception
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
This study aimed to (1) explore whether quality of life (QOL) is more associated with satisfaction with social participation (SP) than with level of accomplishment in SP and (2) examine respective correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP.
A cross-sectional design was used with a convenience sample of 155 older adults (mean age=73.7; 60% women) having various levels of activity limitations. Accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP (dependent variables) were estimated with the social roles items of the assessment of life habits. Potential correlates were human functioning components.
Correlations between QOL and accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP did not differ (P=0.71). However, best correlates of accomplishment level and satisfaction with SP were different. Higher accomplishment level of SP was best explained by younger age, activity level perceived as stable, no recent stressing event, better well-being, higher activity level, and fewer obstacles in "Physical environment and accessibility" (R2=0.79). Greater satisfaction with SP was best explained by activity level perceived as stable, better self-perceived health, better well-being, higher activity level, and more facilitators in "Social support and attitudes" (R2=0.51).
With some exceptions, these best correlates may be positively modified and thus warrant special attention in rehabilitation interventions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20237957 View in PubMed
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Achieving health for all: a framework of health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234807
Source
Probe. 1987 Sep;21(3):1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987

Addressing the realities [correction of realties] of health care in northern aboriginal communities through participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175481
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Author Affiliation
Center for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. bruce.minore@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - economics - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Rural Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
To address concerns about disruptions in the continuity of health care delivered to residents in three remote aboriginal communities in northern Ontario, Canada, the local health authority initiated a study in collaboration with the department of Health Canada responsible for ensuring that aboriginal reserves receive mandatory health services, and an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from two universities. The study focussed on the delivery of oncology, diabetes and mental health care, specifically, as well as systems issues such as recruitment and retention of health human resources and financial costs. The paper discusses the procedures involved, the benefits derived and the challenges encountered in doing this as a community driven participatory action research project. It also summarizes the findings that led to community formulated policy and program recommendations.
PubMed ID
15801551 View in PubMed
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An Evaluation of In-Person and Online Engagement in Central Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277010
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Peter Wilton
Doreen Neville
Rick Audas
Heather Brown
Roger Chafe
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluates the use of in-person focus groups and online engagement within the context of a large public engagement initiative conducted in rural Newfoundland.
Participants were surveyed about their engagement experience and demographic information. Pre and post key informant interviews were also conducted with organizers of the initiative.
Of the 111 participants in the focus groups, 97 (87%) completed evaluation surveys; as did 23 (88%) out of 26 online engagement participants. Overall, focus group participants were positive about their involvement, with 87.4% reporting that they would participate in a similar initiative. Online participation was below expectations and these participants viewed their experience less positively than in-person participants. Organizers viewed the engagement initiative and the combined use of online and in-person engagement positively.
This study presents a real-world example of the use of two methods of engagement. It also highlights the importance of the successful execution of whatever engagement mechanism is selected.
Notes
Cites: Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):e36-919330662
Cites: Healthc Manage Forum. 2008 Winter;21(4):6-2119363962
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Cites: Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):86-9020523159
PubMed ID
26742117 View in PubMed
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An introduction to the framework project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207737
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
J E Till
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Statistics, Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto. till@oci.utoronto.ca
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Aug;1(3):192-5
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Consumer Participation
Decision Making
Efficiency, Organizational
Ethics
Female
Health planning
Health Priorities
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mass Screening
Neoplasms - prevention & control - therapy
Palliative Care
Population Surveillance
Program Development
Research
Smoking - prevention & control
Social Responsibility
Abstract
The framework project of the Advisory Committee on Cancer Control (ACOCC), National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), was based on the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework for bridging the gap between research and action. The project was carried out under the auspices of the Sociobehavioural Cancer Research Network (SCRN) of the NCIC. It focused on 3 research areas of cancer control research: smoking control, palliative care and screening for breast cancer. In this introductory paper, the criteria and methodology used for the framework project are described, the main features of the framework are outlined and the definitions of terms used in the framework are summarized. It was expected that the framework project would lead to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the NCIC/ACOCC conceptual framework. The project was also expected to assist the SCRN in its ongoing efforts to develop and refine an action-oriented research agenda.
PubMed ID
9765744 View in PubMed
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An urgent need to improve life conditions of seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140269
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Hebert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Consumer Participation
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatrics - education
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Poverty - prevention & control
Public Policy - trends
Quebec
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In the fall of 2007, the Government of Quebec set up a Public Consultation on Living Conditions of Seniors. Fifty sessions were held in 26 cities across all 17 regions of the province. More than 4000 seniors attended the sessions and 275 briefs were received from scientists and associations. Three themes were identified in the report published in 2008: supporting seniors and their caregivers, reinforcing the place of seniors in society, and preventing problems associated with aging (suicide, abuse, addictions). The main actions that I recommended included: Increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement to prevent poverty; Modifying pension plans and working conditions to allow for progressive retirement; Making a major investment in home care to provide access to services regardless of place of residence; Introducing an Autonomy Support Benefit and autonomy insurance program for financing services to support people with disabilities; Generalizing an Integrated Service Delivery Network providing services to frail older people; Better training for professionals in gerontology. I also recommended setting up a National Policy on Seniors to align all government departments and agencies, municipalities and the private sector around a vision, objectives and a set of actions for improving the integration of seniors in an aging society. This would contribute to a more equitable, interdependent and wiser society. Unfortunately, the Government did not support these recommendations. It is now time for scientists to get involved in leading policy on seniors and in the political arena.
PubMed ID
20922350 View in PubMed
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Assessment of consumers’ level of engagement in following recommendations for lowering sodium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105022
Source
Appetite. 2014 Feb;73:51-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Julio Ernesto Mendoza
Grietje Anna Schram
JoAnne Arcand
Spencer Henson
Mary L'Abbe
Source
Appetite. 2014 Feb;73:51-7
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Diet
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Food Handling
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Restaurants
Socioeconomic Factors
Sodium - administration & dosage
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Population-wide sodium reduction strategies encourage consumer participation in lowering dietary sodium. This study aims to measure and rank consumers’ level of engagement in following 23 recommendations to reduce dietary sodium and to compare variation in level of consumers’ engagement by sociodemographic sub-groups. The study included 869 randomly selected participants of an online food panel survey from Ontario during November and December 2010. Rasch modelling was used for the analysis. Consumers were less likely to be engaged in 9 out of the 23 recommendations, in particular those related to avoiding foods higher in sodium and implementing sodium reduction strategies while eating in restaurants. Higher level of consumers’ engagement was observed in relation to food preparation practices, including use of low sodium ingredients. In comparison to the relevant reference group, men, older individuals, with lower educational level, single, and those who do not prepare food from scratch showed an overall lower level of engagement in following recommendations to lowering dietary sodium, particularly related to avoiding processed foods. These data provide novel insights and can inform public education campaigns, and highlight the need for interventions and programs targeted at the food supply that can assist consumers in lowering their sodium intake.
PubMed ID
24511619 View in PubMed
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236 records – page 1 of 24.