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Antecedents and effects of consumer involvement in fish as a product group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197952
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H J Juhl
C S Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Information Science, MAPP Centre, The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark.
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Causality
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Denmark
Fish Products - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Psychological
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Abstract
The importance of the symbolic value and of the product utility for a consumer's involvement in fish products was determined by applying a model to data collected in Denmark in 1999. The relative importance of these two antecedents of product involvement differed between two segments of consumers important to marketing strategies. However, the potential effects of involvement did not differ between the segments. Rather, the customer's involvement ensures that sign value and utility have effects such as greater enjoyment of shopping and higher frequency of usage.
PubMed ID
10888289 View in PubMed
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[Basic education. Less mothering--more responsibility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230944
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1989 Apr 26;89(17):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1989
Author
G. Kjaergaard
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1989 Apr 26;89(17):4-7
Date
Apr-26-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Education, Nursing - trends
Humans
Social Responsibility
Students, Nursing
Teaching - methods
PubMed ID
2749573 View in PubMed
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[Being together is better than medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223772
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 20-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1992
Author
G. Kjaergaard
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 20-1
Date
May-20-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Humans
Primary Health Care
Self Care
PubMed ID
1455331 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys, 1987-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51830
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mette Kjøller
Henrik Thoning
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. mk@niph.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Consumer Participation - trends
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Refusal to Participate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The types and quantity of non-response in surveys influence the extent to which the results may be generalized. This study analysed trends in non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys from 1987 to 1994 and used the National Patient Registry to assess whether non-response biased the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on responders. METHODS: The data were for the 23,096 adults sampled for the Danish Health Interview Surveys in 1987, 1991 and 1994. All were followed using the National Patient Registry to obtain such information as hospital admissions. RESULTS: Non-response increased from 20.0% in 1987 to 22.6% in 1994. Four combinations of background variables characterized the non-response: gender and age; gender and civil status; county of residence and age; survey year and age. Non-respondents and respondents had identical gender- and age-standardized hospital admission rates for approximately 5 years before and 2 years after data collection, but non-respondents had a significantly higher rate immediately before and during data collection. Admissions rates were analysed according to reasons for non-response. Refusers had a lower admission rate than respondents before data collection but similar during and after data collection. The rate was higher during the whole period among ill or disabled non-respondents. Among people who could not be contacted during the data collection period a higher admission rate was only found immediately before and during data collection. CONCLUSIONS: Although admission rates differed between respondents and non-respondents these differences were too small to bias the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on respondents.
PubMed ID
16051660 View in PubMed
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Citizen Personas: Exploring Challenges of Citizen-Centric eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277534
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lone Stub Petersen
Pernille Bertelsen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Denmark
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Patient Participation
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Within the field of eHealth, there is a shift towards a patient perspective. However, the focus on the patient often fails to acknowledge and achieve a citizen-centric perspective because there is a lack of understanding of the context and complexities of the person and her relations, interests and activities. In this paper we use the persona of 'Citizen Hanne' for two purposes. Firstly, to highlight and provide detail in the understanding of the citizen perspective and thereby facilitate a shift towards a citizen-centric perspective, which is advanced by many in the field of eHealth. Secondly, we want to further nourish a critical goal of highlighting the challenges in doing citizen-centric eHealth and pointing out the barriers for reaching this goal.
PubMed ID
25991215 View in PubMed
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[Citizens' health. Interview by Grethe Kjaergaard].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223770
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1992
Author
E H Christensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 4-6
Date
May-20-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Advocacy
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Humans
Primary Health Care
PubMed ID
1455333 View in PubMed
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Constructing populations in biobanking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272957
Source
Life Sci Soc Policy. 2015;11:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Aaro Tupasela
Karoliina Snell
Jose A Cañada
Source
Life Sci Soc Policy. 2015;11:5
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Specimen Banks - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - trends
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Participation
Denmark
European Union
Genomics
Humans
Informed Consent - ethics
Policy Making
Public Opinion
Public Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Quality Control
Social Responsibility
Abstract
This article poses the question of whether biobanking practices and standards are giving rise to the construction of populations from which various biobanking initiatives increasingly draw on for legitimacy? We argue that although recent biobanking policies encourage various forms of engagement with publics to ensure legitimacy, different biobanks conceptualize their engagement strategies very differently. We suggest that biobanks undertake a broad range of different strategies with regard to engagement. We argue that these different approaches to engagement strategies are contributing to the construction of populations, whereby specific nationalities, communities, societies, patient groups and political systems become imbued or bio-objectified with particular characteristics, such as compliant, distant, positive, commercialized or authoritarian. This bio-objectification process is problematic in relation to policy aspirations ascribed to biobanking engagement since it gives rise to reified notions of different populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26194269 View in PubMed
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Consumer reporting of adverse drug reactions: a retrospective analysis of the Danish adverse drug reaction database from 2004 to 2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148127
Source
Drug Saf. 2009;32(11):1067-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Lise Aagaard
Lars Hougaard Nielsen
Ebba Holme Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Section for Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. laa@farma.ku.dk
Source
Drug Saf. 2009;32(11):1067-74
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems - statistics & numerical data
Chi-Square Distribution
Consumer Participation - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. Since 2003 in Denmark, consumers have been able to report ADRs directly to the authorities. The objective of this study was to compare ADRs reported by consumers with ADRs reported from other sources, in terms of their type, seriousness and the suspected medicines involved.
The number of ADRs reported to the Danish ADR database from 2004 to 2006 was analysed in terms of category of reporter, seriousness, category of ADRs by system organ class (SOC) and the suspected medicines on level 1 of the anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classification system. ADR reports from consumers were compared with reports from other sources (physicians, pharmacists, lawyers, pharmaceutical companies and other healthcare professionals). Chi-square and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to investigate the dependence between type of reporter and reported ADRs (classified by ATC or SOC).
We analysed 6319 ADR reports corresponding to 15 531 ADRs. Consumers reported 11% of the ADRs. Consumers' share of 'serious' ADRs was comparable to that of physicians (approximately 45%) but lower than that of pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. When consumer reports were compared with reports from other sources, consumers were more likely to report ADRs from the following SOCs: 'nervous system disorders' (OR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.05, 1.53); 'psychiatric disorders' (OR = 1.70; 95% CI 1.31, 2.20) and 'reproductive system and breast disorders' (OR = 2.02; 95% CI 1.13, 3.61) than other sources. Compared with other sources, consumers reported fewer ADRs from the SOCs 'blood and lymphatic system disorders' (OR = 0.22; 95% CI 0.08, 0.59) and 'hepatobiliary system disorders' (OR = 0.14; 95% CI 0.04, 0.57). Consumers were more likely to report ADRs from the ATC group N (nervous system) [OR = 2.72; 95% CI 2.34, 3.17], ATC group P (antiparasitic products) [OR = 2.41; 95% CI 1.32, 4.52] and ATC group S (sensory organs) [OR = 4.79; 95% CI 2.04, 11.23] than other sources. Consumers reported fewer ADRs from the ATC group B (blood and blood-forming organs) [OR = 0.04; 95% CI 0.006, 0.32] and the ATC groups J (anti-infective for systemic use) [OR = 0.44; 95% CI 0.33, 0.58], L (antioneoplastic and immunomodulating agents) [OR = 0.19; 95% CI 0.12, 0.30] and V (various) [OR = 0.03; 95% CI 0.004, 0.21] than other sources. In the SOC 'nervous system disorders', consumers reported seven categories of ADRs that were not reported by the other sources.
This study showed that compared with other sources, consumers reported different categories of ADRs for different types of medicines. Consumers should be actively included in systematic drug surveillance systems, including clinical settings, and their reports should be taken as seriously as reports from other sources.
PubMed ID
19810778 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.