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An inventory of collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal peoples and the Canadian forest sector: linking policies to diversification in forms of engagement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115901
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Apr 15;119:47-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2013
Author
Jean-François Fortier
Stephen Wyatt
David C Natcher
Margaret A Peggy Smith
Martin Hébert
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Department of Sociology, 1030 Avenue des Sciences-Humaines, Local 3469, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada. jean-francois.fortier.1@ulaval.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2013 Apr 15;119:47-55
Date
Apr-15-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Support Techniques
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Forestry - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
This paper examines collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal peoples and the forest sector across Canada. Using a broad definition of collaboration, we identified 1378 arrangements in 474 Aboriginal communities in all Canadian provinces and territories, except Nunavut. We categorize these collaborative arrangements into five broad types: treaties and other formal agreements; planning and management activities; influence on decision-making; forest tenures; and economic roles and partnerships. Consistent data was available for only the first three types, which showed that close to 60% of Aboriginal communities use each approach. However, this masks significant differences between provinces. For example, economic roles and partnerships are in place in all New Brunswick communities and 74% of communities in British Columbia, but only 12% of Manitoban communities. The proportion of communities that have been involved in participatory processes in forest decision-making (such as advisory committees and consultation processes) is particularly high in Quebec with 88% of communities, but only 32% of communities hold forest tenures. We also find that three-quarters of all communities choose to engage in two or more approaches, despite the demands that this can place upon the time and energy of community members. We finally consider how policy environments in different jurisdictions affect the frequency of certain types of collaboration. This empirical study, and the typology that it demonstrates, can inform policy development for Aboriginal involvement in Canadian forestry and help guide future research into broader issues of collaborative governance of natural resources.
PubMed ID
23454413 View in PubMed
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Applying indigenous community-based participatory research principles to partnership development in health disparities research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134004
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Suzanne Christopher
Robin Saha
Paul Lachapelle
Derek Jennings
Yoshiko Colclough
Clarice Cooper
Crescentia Cummins
Margaret J Eggers
Kris Fourstar
Kari Harris
Sandra W Kuntz
Victoria Lafromboise
Deborah Laveaux
Tracie McDonald
James Real Bird
Elizabeth Rink
Lennie Webster
Author Affiliation
Montana State University, Bozeman 59717, USA. suzanne@montana.edu
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Research
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Intervention Studies
Questionnaires
Trust
United States
Universities
Abstract
This case study of community and university research partnerships utilizes previously developed principles for conducting research in the context of Native American communities to consider how partners understand and apply the principles in developing community-based participatory research partnerships to reduce health disparities. The 7 partnership projects are coordinated through a National Institutes of Health-funded center and involve a variety of tribal members, including both health care professionals and lay persons and native and nonnative university researchers. This article provides detailed examples of how these principles are applied to the projects and discusses the overarching and interrelated emergent themes of sharing power and building trust.
PubMed ID
21633218 View in PubMed
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Balancing empiricism and local cultural knowledge in the design of prevention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174453
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Philip A Fisher
Thomas J Ball
Author Affiliation
Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR 97401-2426, USA. philf@oslc.org
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2 Suppl 3):iii44-55
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - organization & administration
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Empirical Research
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research - methods
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Inuits - ethnology
Models, organizational
Primary Prevention - methods - organization & administration
Research Design
Abstract
Prevention research aims to address health and social problems via systematic strategies for affecting and documenting change. To produce meaningful and lasting results at the level of the community, prevention research frequently requires investigators to reevaluate the boundaries that have traditionally separated them from the subjects of their investigations. New tools and techniques are required to facilitate collaboration between researchers and communities while maintaining scientific rigor. This article describes the tribal participatory research approach, which was developed to facilitate culturally centered prevention research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This approach is discussed within the broader context of community-based participatory research, an increasingly prevalent paradigm in the prevention field. Strengths and limitations of the approach used in the study are presented.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15933330 View in PubMed
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Building capacity for heart health promotion: results of a 5-year experience in Nova Scotia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186929
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
David R MacLean
Jane Farquharson
Stephanie Heath
Kari Barkhouse
Celeste Latter
Christine Joffres
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, 5849 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4H7 Canada.
Source
Am J Health Promot. 2003 Jan-Feb;17(3):202-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Education
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Nova Scotia
Program Evaluation
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
To present the outcomes of a capacity-building initiative for heart health promotion.
Follow-up study combining quantitative and qualitative methods.
The Western Health Region of Nova Scotia, Canada.
Twenty organizations, including provincial and municipal agencies and community groups engaged in health, education, and recreation activities.
Two strategies were used for this study: partnership development and organizational development. Partnership development included the creation of multilevel partnerships in diverse sectors. Organizational development included the provision of technical support, action research, community activation, and organizational consultation.
Quantitative data included number and type of partnerships, learning opportunities, community activation initiatives, and organizational changes. Qualitative data included information on the effectiveness of partnerships, organizational consultation, and organizational changes.
Results included the development of 204 intersectoral partnerships, creation of a health promotion clearinghouse, 47 workshops attended by approximately 1400 participants, diverse research products, implementation of 18 community heart health promotion initiatives, and increased organizational capacity for heart health promotion via varied organizational changes, including policy changes, fund reallocations, and enhanced knowledge and practices.
Partnership and organizational development were effective mechanisms for building capacity in heart health promotion. This intervention may have implications for large-scale, community-based, chronic-disease prevention projects.
PubMed ID
12545589 View in PubMed
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Capacity building from the inside out: development and evaluation of a CITI ethics certification training module for American Indian and Alaska Native community researchers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257375
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2014 Feb;9(1):46-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Cynthia R Pearson
Myra Parker
Celia B Fisher
Claudia Moreno
Author Affiliation
University of Washington.
Source
J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2014 Feb;9(1):46-57
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Capacity building
Certification - standards
Community-Based Participatory Research
Comprehension
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Curriculum - standards
Educational Measurement
Ethics, Research - education
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Self Efficacy
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
Current human subject research training modules fail to capture ethically relevant cultural aspects of research involving American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) community members. Applying a Community Engaged Research (CEnR) approach, we adapted the Collaborative IRB Training Initiative training module "assessing risk and benefits." In a two-arm randomized controlled trial, followed by debriefing interviews, we evaluated module acceptability and understandability (test scores) among 40 reservation-based community members. Participants who took the adapted module, compared to those who took the standard module, reported higher scores on relevance of the material overall satisfaction, module quiz scores, and a trend toward higher self-efficacy. Implications of the efficacy of this approach for enhancing ethics training and community participation in research within AI/AN and other cultural populations within and outside the United States are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24572083 View in PubMed
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Citizen participation in the reform of health care policy: a case example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209321
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(2):31-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
D. Macfarlane
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Mental Health Society/Riverview Hospital, Port Coquitlam, Canada.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(2):31-5
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services Research
Humans
Ontario
Policy Making
Abstract
The trend toward greater citizen participation in health care policy reform has its roots in the consumerism of the 1960s. This era witnessed the beginning of a dispersion of power in health care and an increase in the number and variety of stakeholders involved in the policy development process. Using the reform Ontario's long-term care policy as a case example, this paper offers observations about the benefits and challenges of participative policy-making. Despite the challenges and the paucity of hard evidence pointing to benefits, the author concludes that broad citizen participation in health care policy reform is a desirable goal. However, the capacity for genuine collaboration remains underdeveloped and requires more systematic refinement.
PubMed ID
10159410 View in PubMed
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Community-academic research partnerships with vulnerable populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160639
Source
Annu Rev Nurs Res. 2007;25:317-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Janna Lesser
Manuel Angel Oscós-Sánchez
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Nursing Care, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA.
Source
Annu Rev Nurs Res. 2007;25:317-37
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Research - organization & administration
Research Design
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
Universities - organization & administration
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Community-academic research partnerships have evolved as a multidisciplinary approach to involve those communities experiencing health disparities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of health interventions. Community-academic partnerships are intended to bring together academic researchers and communities to share power, establish trust, foster colearning, enhance strengths and resources, build community capacity, and address community-identified needs and health problems. The purpose of this chapter is to review the current state of community-academic research partnerships in the United States and Canada. We discuss contextual issues; present a review of the current literature; identify the major strengths, challenges, and lessons learned that have emerged during the course of these research collaborations; and explore implications for future research and policy.
PubMed ID
17958297 View in PubMed
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Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Nancy Cavanaugh
Kaats Saa Waa Della Cheney
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, USA.
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Health Care Coalitions
Health status
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Public Health Administration
State Government
Abstract
This article describes the collaborative efforts of the Sitka Turning Point Towards Health partnership in Sitka, Alaska. Key steps to its success include defining our terms, finding consensus, maintaining an attitude of respect, engaging people--building relationships, creating work groups, sharing leadership, committing to collaborative leadership, building in sustainability, and telling our story. We have chosen to interlace a weaving metaphor to reflect our Alaskan Native American culture and the vision of our partnership.
Notes
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):34-511789035
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):36-811789036
PubMed ID
11789032 View in PubMed
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Community collaboration to increase foreign-born women's participation in a cervical cancer screening program in Sweden: a quality improvement project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267612
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13:62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Erik Olsson
Malena Lau
Svante Lifvergren
Alexander Chakhunashvili
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13:62
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Culture
Doulas
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Quality Improvement
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Abstract
The prevailing inequities in healthcare have been well addressed in previous research, especially screening program participation, but less attention has been paid to how to overcome these inequities. This paper explores a key factor of a successful improvement project: collaboration with local doulas to raise cervical cancer screening participation by more than 40 percent in an area with a large number of foreign-born residents.
Data was collected through two focus group discussions with the doulas in order to design interventions and debrief after interventions had been carried out in the community. Various tools were used to analyze the verbal data and monitor the progress of the project.
Three major themes emerged from the focus group discussions: barriers that prevent women from participating in the cervical cancer screening program, interventions to increase participation, and the role of the doulas in the interventions.
This paper suggests that several barriers make participation in cervical cancer screening program more difficult for foreign-born women in Sweden. Specifically, these barriers include lack of knowledge concerning cancer and the importance of preventive healthcare services and practical obstacles such as unavailable child care and language skills. The overarching approach to surmount these barriers was to engage persons with a shared cultural background and mother tongue as the target audience to verbally communicate information. The doulas who helped to identify barriers and plan and execute interventions gained increased confidence and a sense of pride in assisting to bridge the gap between healthcare providers and users.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25106490 View in PubMed
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Community governance of the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project, Kahnawake Territory, Mohawk Nation, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184076
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Sep;18(3):177-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Margaret Cargo
Lucie Lévesque
Ann C Macaulay
Alex McComber
Serge Desrosiers
Treena Delormier
Louise Potvin
Author Affiliation
KSDPP, Kahnawake Territory, Kanien'keh (Mohawk Nation), Québec, Canada. mcargo@total.net
Source
Health Promot Int. 2003 Sep;18(3):177-87
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advisory Committees
Canada
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Decision Making
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology - prevention & control
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
School Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
Health promotion emphasizes the importance of community ownership in the governance of community-based programmes, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study examined perceptions of community ownership among project partners taking responsibility for decision-making related to the Kahnawake Schools Diabetes Prevention Project (KSDPP). Project partners were surveyed cross-sectionally at 18 months (T1) and 60 months (T2) into the project. The perceived influence of each project partner was assessed at T1 and T2 for three domains: (i) KSDPP activities; (ii) KSDPP operations; and (iii) Community Advisory Board (CAB) activities. Project staff were perceived to have the greatest influence on KSDPP activities, KSDPP operations and CAB activities at both T1 and T2. High mean scores of perceived influence for CAB members and community researchers, however, suggests that project decision-making was a shared responsibility among multiple community partners. Although academic researcher influence was consistently low, they were satisfied with their level of influence. This was unlike community affiliates, who were less satisfied with their lower level of influence. In keeping with Kanien'kehaka (Mohawk) culture, the findings suggest a participatory democracy or shared decision-making as the primary mode of governance of KSDPP.
PubMed ID
12920138 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.