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Antecedents and effects of consumer involvement in fish as a product group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197952
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H J Juhl
C S Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Information Science, MAPP Centre, The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark.
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Causality
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Denmark
Fish Products - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Psychological
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Abstract
The importance of the symbolic value and of the product utility for a consumer's involvement in fish products was determined by applying a model to data collected in Denmark in 1999. The relative importance of these two antecedents of product involvement differed between two segments of consumers important to marketing strategies. However, the potential effects of involvement did not differ between the segments. Rather, the customer's involvement ensures that sign value and utility have effects such as greater enjoyment of shopping and higher frequency of usage.
PubMed ID
10888289 View in PubMed
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Assessment of consumers’ level of engagement in following recommendations for lowering sodium intake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105022
Source
Appetite. 2014 Feb;73:51-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Julio Ernesto Mendoza
Grietje Anna Schram
JoAnne Arcand
Spencer Henson
Mary L'Abbe
Source
Appetite. 2014 Feb;73:51-7
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Diet
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Female
Food Handling
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Restaurants
Socioeconomic Factors
Sodium - administration & dosage
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - administration & dosage
Young Adult
Abstract
Population-wide sodium reduction strategies encourage consumer participation in lowering dietary sodium. This study aims to measure and rank consumers’ level of engagement in following 23 recommendations to reduce dietary sodium and to compare variation in level of consumers’ engagement by sociodemographic sub-groups. The study included 869 randomly selected participants of an online food panel survey from Ontario during November and December 2010. Rasch modelling was used for the analysis. Consumers were less likely to be engaged in 9 out of the 23 recommendations, in particular those related to avoiding foods higher in sodium and implementing sodium reduction strategies while eating in restaurants. Higher level of consumers’ engagement was observed in relation to food preparation practices, including use of low sodium ingredients. In comparison to the relevant reference group, men, older individuals, with lower educational level, single, and those who do not prepare food from scratch showed an overall lower level of engagement in following recommendations to lowering dietary sodium, particularly related to avoiding processed foods. These data provide novel insights and can inform public education campaigns, and highlight the need for interventions and programs targeted at the food supply that can assist consumers in lowering their sodium intake.
PubMed ID
24511619 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
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Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107672
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Amy Colquhoun
Janis Geary
Karen J Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Communication
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Health Literacy
Helicobacter Infections - prevention & control
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Public Health - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to illustrate, from a researcher's perspective, some of the challenges of conducting public health research in teams comprising members with varying backgrounds. The consequences of these challenges will be outlined, and potential solutions will be offered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986884 View in PubMed
Documents
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Coeur en santé St-Henri--a heart health promotion programme in Montreal, Canada: design and methods for evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214268
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Oct;49(5):495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
N. Kishchuk
K. Gray-Donald
L. Renaud
P. Finès
T. Barnett
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Montreal General Hospital, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1995 Oct;49(5):495-502
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Awareness
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Health Education - methods
Health promotion
Humans
Intervention Studies
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Research Design
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Urban health
Abstract
This paper describes the objectives, design, and methods of evaluation of the impact of the coeur en santé St-Henri programme, as well as selected results from the evaluation to date. It discusses the possible effects of study design choices made to maintain the impact evaluation within budget.
The impact of the programme is evaluated in a community trial which compares the prevalence of cardiovascular disease behavioural risk factors before and after programme implementation in the intervention and a matched comparison community, in both longitudinal cohort and independent sample surveys. In addition, repeated independent sample surveys are conducted in the intervention community to monitor awareness of and participation in the programme.
The baseline sample for both the longitudinal cohort and independent sample surveys included 849 subjects from the intervention community (79.3% of 1071 eligible subjects--8.0% could not be contacted and 12.6% refused) and 825 subjects from the comparison community (77.8% of 1066 eligible subjects--6.6% could not be contacted and 15.6% refused). The two surveys on awareness and participation conducted to date, included 461 (71.0% of 649 eligible subjects) and 387 (67.9% of 570 eligible subjects) subjects respectively from the intervention community.
Baseline data for the longitudinal cohort and independent sample surveys on behavioural risk factor outcomes including use of tobacco, physical activity behaviour, high fat diet, and behaviours related to blood pressure and cholesterol control were collected in 35 minute telephone interviews in both the intervention and comparison communities. Data on awareness of and participation in the programme were collected in 10 minute interviews in the intervention community only in two independent sample surveys conducted seven and 22 months respectively after the baseline survey.
With the exception of smoking, the intervention and comparison communities were similar at baseline with regard to the prevalence of behavioural risk factors studied. Awareness of the coeur en santé programme increased from 64.1% in January 1993 to 72.9% 15 months later. Participation in the programme increased from 21.3% to 33.7%.
This paper presents background information on the evaluation of the impact of the coeur en santé programme, as a reference for future publications.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7499993 View in PubMed
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Collaboration versus communication: The Department of Energy's Amchitka Island and the Aleut Community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89766
Source
Environ Res. 2009 May;109(4):503-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Burger Joanna
Gochfeld Michael
Pletnikoff Karen
Author Affiliation
Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA. burger@biology.Rutgers.edu
Source
Environ Res. 2009 May;109(4):503-10
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Communication
Consensus
Conservation of Natural Resources
Consumer Participation
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Nuclear Warfare
Public Policy
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Radioisotopes - analysis
Research
Risk assessment
United States
United States Government Agencies
Waste management
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Increasingly managers and scientists are recognizing that solving environmental problems requires the inclusion of a wide range of disciplines, governmental agencies, Native American tribes, and other stakeholders. Usually such inclusion involves communication at the problem-formulation phase, and at the end to report findings. This paper examines participatory research, the differences between the traditional stakeholder involvement method of communication (often one-way, at the beginning and the end), compared to full collaboration, where parties are actively involved in the scientific process. Using the Department of Energy's (DOE) Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study, we demonstrate that the inclusion of Aleut people throughout the process resulted in science that was relevant not only to the agency's needs and to the interested and affected parties, but that led to a solution. Amchitka Island was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971, and virtually no testing of radionuclide levels in biota, subsistence foods, or commercial fish was conducted after the 1970s. When DOE announced plans to close Amchitka, terminating its managerial responsibility, without any further testing of radionuclide levels in biota, there was considerable controversy, which resulted in the development of a Science Plan to assess the potential risks to the marine environment from the tests. The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) was the principle entity that developed and executed the science plan. Unlike traditional science, CRESP embarked on a process to include the Alaskan Natives of the Aleutian Islands (Aleuts), relevant state and federal agencies, and other stakeholders at every phase. Aleuts were included in the problem-formulation, research design refinement, the research, analysis of data, dissemination of research findings, and public communication. This led to agreement with the results, and to developing a path forward (production of a biomonitoring plan designed to provide early warning of any future radionuclide leakage and ecosystem/human health risks). The process outlined was successful in resolving a previously contentious situation by inclusion and collaboration with the Aleuts, among others, and could be usefully applied elsewhere to complex environmental problems where severe data gaps exist.
PubMed ID
19264301 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Canadian Nurse. 1978 Oct; 74(9):24-27.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
Trimmer, B.L.
Source
Canadian Nurse. 1978 Oct; 74(9):24-27.
Date
1978
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Training
Community health aides
Family service aide
Community health representatives
Canada
Communication
Community Health Nursing
Consumer Participation
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1607.
Less detail
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Nancy Cavanaugh
Kaats Saa Waa Della Cheney
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, USA.
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):13-20
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Data Collection
Health Care Coalitions
Health status
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Leadership
Pilot Projects
Program Development
Public Health Administration
State Government
Abstract
This article describes the collaborative efforts of the Sitka Turning Point Towards Health partnership in Sitka, Alaska. Key steps to its success include defining our terms, finding consensus, maintaining an attitude of respect, engaging people--building relationships, creating work groups, sharing leadership, committing to collaborative leadership, building in sustainability, and telling our story. We have chosen to interlace a weaving metaphor to reflect our Alaskan Native American culture and the vision of our partnership.
Notes
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):34-511789035
Comment In: J Public Health Manag Pract. 2002 Jan;8(1):36-811789036
PubMed ID
11789032 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.