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Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107672
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Amy Colquhoun
Janis Geary
Karen J Goodman
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pages 864-870 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):864-870
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Communication
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Health Literacy
Helicobacter Infections - prevention & control
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwest Territories
Public Health - methods
Yukon Territory
Abstract
Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to illustrate, from a researcher's perspective, some of the challenges of conducting public health research in teams comprising members with varying backgrounds. The consequences of these challenges will be outlined, and potential solutions will be offered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23986884 View in PubMed
Documents
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Collaboration versus communication: The Department of Energy's Amchitka Island and the Aleut Community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89766
Source
Environ Res. 2009 May;109(4):503-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Burger Joanna
Gochfeld Michael
Pletnikoff Karen
Author Affiliation
Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082, USA. burger@biology.Rutgers.edu
Source
Environ Res. 2009 May;109(4):503-10
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Communication
Consensus
Conservation of Natural Resources
Consumer Participation
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Nuclear Warfare
Public Policy
Public-Private Sector Partnerships
Radioisotopes - analysis
Research
Risk assessment
United States
United States Government Agencies
Waste management
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
Increasingly managers and scientists are recognizing that solving environmental problems requires the inclusion of a wide range of disciplines, governmental agencies, Native American tribes, and other stakeholders. Usually such inclusion involves communication at the problem-formulation phase, and at the end to report findings. This paper examines participatory research, the differences between the traditional stakeholder involvement method of communication (often one-way, at the beginning and the end), compared to full collaboration, where parties are actively involved in the scientific process. Using the Department of Energy's (DOE) Amchitka Island in the Aleutians as a case study, we demonstrate that the inclusion of Aleut people throughout the process resulted in science that was relevant not only to the agency's needs and to the interested and affected parties, but that led to a solution. Amchitka Island was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971, and virtually no testing of radionuclide levels in biota, subsistence foods, or commercial fish was conducted after the 1970s. When DOE announced plans to close Amchitka, terminating its managerial responsibility, without any further testing of radionuclide levels in biota, there was considerable controversy, which resulted in the development of a Science Plan to assess the potential risks to the marine environment from the tests. The Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) was the principle entity that developed and executed the science plan. Unlike traditional science, CRESP embarked on a process to include the Alaskan Natives of the Aleutian Islands (Aleuts), relevant state and federal agencies, and other stakeholders at every phase. Aleuts were included in the problem-formulation, research design refinement, the research, analysis of data, dissemination of research findings, and public communication. This led to agreement with the results, and to developing a path forward (production of a biomonitoring plan designed to provide early warning of any future radionuclide leakage and ecosystem/human health risks). The process outlined was successful in resolving a previously contentious situation by inclusion and collaboration with the Aleuts, among others, and could be usefully applied elsewhere to complex environmental problems where severe data gaps exist.
PubMed ID
19264301 View in PubMed
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Source
Canadian Nurse. 1978 Oct; 74(9):24-27.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
Trimmer, B.L.
Source
Canadian Nurse. 1978 Oct; 74(9):24-27.
Date
1978
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Training
Community health aides
Family service aide
Community health representatives
Canada
Communication
Community Health Nursing
Consumer Participation
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1607.
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Consumer participation in cancer system planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216210
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(4):27-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
R. Gray
M. Fitch
M. Greenberg
S. Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 1995;11(4):27-33
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Community Networks
Consumer Participation
Female
Health Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Neoplasms
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
PubMed ID
8648519 View in PubMed
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Development of a public participation and communication protocol for establishing fish consumption advisories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184714
Source
Risk Anal. 2003 Jun;23(3):461-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Cynthia G Jardine
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, 302 Human Ecology Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2N1, Canada. cindy.jardine@ualberta.ca
Source
Risk Anal. 2003 Jun;23(3):461-71
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Communication
Consumer Participation
Eating
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk Management
Trust
Abstract
Enabling people to make an informed choice on whether to change consumption behavior is ultimately the objective of any fish consumption advisory. This will occur only if people are aware of the advisory, know and understand the advisory information, and believe the information to be true. Interactive, meaningful communication and the opportunity to participate in the process to develop and review advisories are key to achieving these attributes. A case study was undertaken in a community in Alberta, Canada (where an existing advisory was under consideration for review) to determine public awareness, knowledge, compliance, communication effectiveness, information needs, and desire for involvement related to the advisory. The information obtained from this case study was used to develop 14 guiding principles as a foundation for the incorporation of public participation and risk communication into the process of developing and reviewing fish consumption advisories.
PubMed ID
12836839 View in PubMed
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The hopes and hazards of health goals development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219996
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
N J Fraser-Lee
P J Macdonald
J M Howell
P A Hessel
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Services Administration and Community Medicine, University of Alberta.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Nov-Dec;84(6):419-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Communication
Consumer Participation
Health Planning Councils
Health Priorities
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Urban health
Abstract
As part of the Edmonton Board of Health's centennial celebrations, health goals and objectives were developed for the city. The intensely collaborative process used to develop the goals and objectives is reviewed and critical activities such as communication, media and community involvement, committee membership, and implementation are discussed. It is hoped that the information will be useful for others who are developing health goals and objectives at the municipal level.
PubMed ID
8131149 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.