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Accident prevention activities in the Norwegian municipalities: the local response to a nationwide campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36240
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
F. Thuen
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adult
Child
Consumer Participation - trends
Health Education - trends
Health Plan Implementation
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Abstract
The Norwegian "Campaign Against Home Accidents" was launched nationwide during 1988 to 1991, with the goal of reducing the incidence of home accidents by 20%. The aim of the campaign was to urge primarily the municipal health services to form local accident prevention groups and to implement local measures for prevention of home accidents. On the basis of two surveys, after one year and at the end of the national campaign, an evaluation was carried out concerning the participation of the municipal health services in the campaign and the impact of the campaign on local accident prevention activities. The results indicate that the national campaign engaged the majority of the municipalities and stimulated local accident prevention work to some extent. Most local activities were health education measures, whereas environmental intervention were less commonly reported. Involvement in the campaign was the variable most related to level of accident prevention activities at the end of the campaign period. However, the relationship was only modest. Restricted economical resources, too little emphasis on environmental change, lack of political involvement and insufficient use of coalition partners at the community level are suggested as the major explanations for the limited effect of the campaign.
PubMed ID
8367680 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of and support for youth involvement in public decision-making: a report on nine case studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201552
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):4p
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. McCall
B. Hill
M. Johnston
Author Affiliation
Canadian Association for School Health.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):4p
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Consumer Participation
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Lobbying
Public Health
PubMed ID
10401177 View in PubMed
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Being useful: achieving indigenous youth involvement in a community-based participatory research project in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124411
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Tara Ford
Stacy Rasmus
James Allen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology and Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA. tjford@alaska.edu
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-7
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Community-Based Participatory Research - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Abstract
To report on a participatory research process in southwest Alaska focusing on youth involvement as a means to facilitate health promotion. We propose youth-guided community-based participatory research (CBPR) as way to involve young people in health promotion and prevention strategizing as part of translational science practice at the community-level.
We utilized a CBPR approach that allowed youth to contribute at all stages.
Implementation of the CBPR approach involved the advancement of three key strategies including: (a) the local steering committee made up of youth, tribal leaders, and elders, (b) youth-researcher partnerships, and (c) youth action-groups to translate findings.
The addition of a local youth-action and translation group to the CBPR process in the southwest Alaska site represents an innovative strategy for disseminating findings to youth from a research project that focuses on youth resilience and wellbeing. This strategy drew from two community-based action activities: (a) being useful by helping elders and (b) being proud of our village.
In our study, youth informed the research process at every stage, but most significantly youth guided the translation and application of the research findings at the community level. Findings from the research project were translated by youth into serviceable action in the community where they live. The research created an experience for youth to spend time engaged in activities that, from their perspectives, are important and contribute to their wellbeing and healthy living. Youth-guided CBPR meant involving youth in the process of not only understanding the research process but living through it as well.
Notes
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Aug;69(4):565-7019596503
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2009;16(1):1-2419340763
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-20319700231
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:37819814791
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):498-50720044967
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2010 Apr;69(2):158-6720356467
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2010 Mar-Apr;27(2):104-1420433664
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2010 Sep;46(1-2):100-1420549334
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Sep;71(6):1102-920621405
Cites: J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2011 Jun;23(6):298-30421649772
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2003 Jan;42(1):57-6512500077
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2001 Apr;60(2):102-1111507959
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):473-8722067096
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2004 Jun;33(3-4):263-7315212184
Cites: ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2004 Jul-Sep;27(3):162-7515455579
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2005 Dec;36(3-4):275-9116389500
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Sep;96(9):1623-816873759
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2006 Jul;7(3):312-2316760238
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Dec;63(11):2938-4816952416
Cites: Addiction. 2008 Feb;103(2):205-1518042193
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2008 Feb;35(1):70-8616740514
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2008 Aug;98(8):1398-40618556605
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2008 Jun;38(3):311-2018611129
Cites: AIDS Care. 2008 Oct;20(9):1039-4918825513
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Jun;68(3):274-9119705659
PubMed ID
22584510 View in PubMed
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Benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs in three low-income Ontario communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193476
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H G Edward
S. Evers
Author Affiliation
St. Joseph's Health Care System Research Network, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Diet
Female
Focus Groups
Food Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Ontario
Poverty - psychology
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs. We did a content analysis of focus groups with parents (n=21), teachers (n=10), project staff (n=21), and children (n=17) in three low-income Ontario communities. The key benefits identified by the three adult groups were hunger alleviation and social contact opportunities for both parents and children. Parents also benefited from volunteering with and/or participating in food programs because neighbourhood support networks developed. Teachers reported that children who attended breakfast programs became more attentive in school. The food programs also provided an opportunity for nutrition education. Offering food as part of all community programs (not just those designed to increase food availability) encouraged participation and increased attendance. Children thought that attending food programs kept them healthy, and helped them work harder in school. Parents' pride was the main barrier to participation in programs; however, parents who were actively involved in program delivery did not feel stigmatized accepting food. To encourage participation, nutrition professionals should collaborate with local residents to develop and implement community-based food programs.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002 Summer;63(2):52; author reply 52-312084182
PubMed ID
11524050 View in PubMed
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Bicycle helmet promotion. Prototype for physician activism in injury prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218093
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1074-5, 1080-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
R. Cushman
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1074-5, 1080-1
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - injuries
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Consumer Participation
Head Protective Devices
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Physician's Role
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 1985 Feb;32(1):141-513975084
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 25;320(21):1361-72716781
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Oct 27;262(16):2256-612795807
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1581-51571869
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Oct;40:1703-47950463
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1116-248019188
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1126-318019189
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1132-78019190
PubMed ID
8019179 View in PubMed
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Bicycle helmet use among schoolchildren. Impact of a community education program and a cycling fatality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218091
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1116-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
L L Rourke
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1116-24
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bicycling - injuries
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Female
Head Protective Devices - economics - utilization
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Fairs
Humans
Male
Motivation
Ontario
Ownership
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Schools
Sex Factors
Wounds and Injuries - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
To assess the effect of a community bicycle helmet education and subsidy program and the further effect of a bicycle rodeo on helmet ownership and use among elementary schoolchildren. The unanticipated effect of a child cyclist fatality was also measured.
Helmet ownership and use were measured in two ways: a questionnaire was sent to all elementary schoolteachers asking about helmet ownership and use by their students; and volunteers counted the children riding their bicycles to school.
Elementary schools in the town of Goderich, population 7400, and the town of Kincardine, population 6227, both on Lake Huron in southwestern Ontario.
More than 80% of the 1050 elementary school students in Goderich and, for comparison, more than 90% of the 1439 elementary school students in Kincardine.
An extensive education campaign with programs, assemblies, teaching aids, speakers, and a colouring and poster contest, coupled with a discount helmet offer in October 1991. Incentives to helmet use, such as bicycle rodeos, took place in May 1992 and 1993. A child cyclist not wearing a helmet was fatally injured in September 1992.
Teachers polled students on helmet use and student volunteers counted children riding bicycles and noted helmet use.
A total of 250 helmets were purchased, and helmet use was observed to increase among 5- to 14-year-old children from 0.75% to 12.8% during 9 months. Program effect was significantly greater on younger children, and girls used helmets more often than boys did. The cycling fatality in Goderich was associated with a dramatic increase in helmet use (to more than 50%), a significantly higher rate than in Kincardine. A second subsidy and rodeo did not further increase helmet use.
A small community with limited resources can mount a bicycle helmet education and incentive program with high exposure and participation rates by children. Despite an initial 17-fold increase in observed helmet use, more than 87% of cyclists still did not wear helmets. The cycling fatality was associated with a significant increase in helmet use.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1220-13407826
Cites: Pediatrics. 1993 Apr;91(4):772-78464665
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 25;320(21):1361-72716781
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Oct 27;262(16):2256-612795807
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1990 Jun;30(6):677-802345336
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1990 Jun;144(6):727-312346157
Cites: CMAJ. 1990 Jul 15;143(2):108-122364332
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1990 Aug;144(8):928-92378342
Cites: Pediatrics. 1991 Jul;88(1):43-72057272
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1044-61853997
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):972-31854012
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1581-51571869
Cites: Pediatrics. 1992 Jun;89(6 Pt 2):1216-201594379
Cites: Pediatrics. 1992 Jun;89(6 Pt 2):1248-501594383
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1992 May-Jun;107(3):283-91594738
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 4;266(21):3016-81820476
Cites: Pediatrics. 1992 Sep;90(3):354-81518688
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1992 Nov;31(11):672-71424396
Cites: J Trauma. 1992 Dec;33(6):887-931474633
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1993 Feb;28(2):214-68437084
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1074-5, 1080-18019179
PubMed ID
8019188 View in PubMed
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CHARGE association looking at the future--the voice of a family support group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219893
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Nov-Dec;19(6):395-409
Publication Type
Article
Author
K D Blake
D. Brown
Author Affiliation
Memorial University, St Johns, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Child Care Health Dev. 1993 Nov-Dec;19(6):395-409
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Case Management - standards
Child
Child Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Cost of Illness
Developmental Disabilities - etiology - therapy
Education, Special - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hearing Disorders - etiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Movement Disorders - etiology - therapy
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Self-Help Groups - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Teratogens
Vision Disorders - etiology - therapy
Voluntary Health Agencies - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
CHARGE association is a non-random collection of congenital anomalies. The condition is becoming more widely known to medical and educational professionals. The number of children diagnosed is increasing, probably because of the greater awareness of this condition. This paper considers some of the long-term management problems which are often deferred in the early months, when acute life threatening problems take priority. Questionnaires were sent to parents via the CHARGE Association Family Support Group, UK. Thirty-nine were returned and incomplete information was sought by personal contact or telephone. The majority of children were known professionally to one or both authors and information was therefore checked from medical and educational notes. There is still widespread misunderstanding about the impact of multiple disability, especially when this includes multi-sensory impairment, on the early development of the child. Therefore, the information collected from the study has been from an educational and medical perspective, thereby aiding the understanding of these complex problems. At the parents request, information was gathered about certain teratogens, of which Lindane, an organophosphate, is highlighted.
PubMed ID
9098398 View in PubMed
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Child factors associated with parent involvement in usual clinical care of children and adolescents: a national register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77600
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(3):173-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Israel Pravin
Thomsen Per H
Langeveld Johannes H
Stormark Kjell M
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stavanger University Hospital, Hillevåg, Stavanger, Norway. pravin@sir.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2007;61(3):173-81
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Child Development - classification
Community Mental Health Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Health
Family Relations
Family Therapy - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Role
Sex Factors
Abstract
The study examined the role of child level characteristics of age, gender, disorder and experience of family breakdown on parent involvement in the treatment of children and adolescents in a usual clinical care setting. Data from the national register of 20,856 children and adolescents treated in psychiatric hospitals and clinics in Norway in 2002 were analyzed using a three-level hierarchical model. Consultations attended by the child, mother and father were constructed as level 1, child characteristics as level 2 and clinics as level 3. Results indicated that 42% of the variance was explained by within-family differences of consultations and 56% by child characteristics. Only 2% of the variance was explained by clinic-to-clinic differences. In the total model, child factors of gender, disorder and family breakdown (but not age) were significant predictors of consultation with children and parents. Therapists should take into account the role of the gender, disorder and family breakdown in promoting parent involvement and hindering premature termination.
PubMed ID
17523028 View in PubMed
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Community-based action research in a multi-site prevention project: challenges and resolutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215589
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):229-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M. Reitsma-Street
R. Arnold
Author Affiliation
Laurentian University.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):229-40
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
This article examines the use of action research strategies over a four-year period in developing and evaluating a prevention program for children and their families. This research has taken place in a low-income multi-cultural neighbourhood in Sudbury. Strategies to foster participation and the practical relevance of findings are described, both for the initial proposal development stage, and for the period after a local program was funded as part of a multi-site evaluation project. After reviewing the challenges inherent in doing action research within a multicultural neighbourhood, and within a multi-site design, we discuss which strategies have worked, and what remains to be resolved.
PubMed ID
10151078 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.