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An Evaluation of In-Person and Online Engagement in Central Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277010
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Peter Wilton
Doreen Neville
Rick Audas
Heather Brown
Roger Chafe
Source
Healthc Policy. 2015 Nov;11(2):72-85
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluates the use of in-person focus groups and online engagement within the context of a large public engagement initiative conducted in rural Newfoundland.
Participants were surveyed about their engagement experience and demographic information. Pre and post key informant interviews were also conducted with organizers of the initiative.
Of the 111 participants in the focus groups, 97 (87%) completed evaluation surveys; as did 23 (88%) out of 26 online engagement participants. Overall, focus group participants were positive about their involvement, with 87.4% reporting that they would participate in a similar initiative. Online participation was below expectations and these participants viewed their experience less positively than in-person participants. Organizers viewed the engagement initiative and the combined use of online and in-person engagement positively.
This study presents a real-world example of the use of two methods of engagement. It also highlights the importance of the successful execution of whatever engagement mechanism is selected.
Notes
Cites: Med Teach. 2009 Feb;31(2):e36-919330662
Cites: Healthc Manage Forum. 2008 Winter;21(4):6-2119363962
Cites: Health Policy. 2009 Aug;91(3):219-2819261347
Cites: Healthc Q. 2010;13(3):86-9020523159
PubMed ID
26742117 View in PubMed
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Antecedents and effects of consumer involvement in fish as a product group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197952
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H J Juhl
C S Poulsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Information Science, MAPP Centre, The Aarhus School of Business, Denmark.
Source
Appetite. 2000 Jun;34(3):261-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Causality
Consumer Participation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Data Collection
Denmark
Fish Products - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Psychological
Product Surveillance, Postmarketing
Abstract
The importance of the symbolic value and of the product utility for a consumer's involvement in fish products was determined by applying a model to data collected in Denmark in 1999. The relative importance of these two antecedents of product involvement differed between two segments of consumers important to marketing strategies. However, the potential effects of involvement did not differ between the segments. Rather, the customer's involvement ensures that sign value and utility have effects such as greater enjoyment of shopping and higher frequency of usage.
PubMed ID
10888289 View in PubMed
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An urgent need to improve life conditions of seniors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140269
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
R. Hebert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2010 Oct;14(8):711-4
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Consumer Participation
Disabled Persons
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatrics - education
Health Priorities
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Poverty - prevention & control
Public Policy - trends
Quebec
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
In the fall of 2007, the Government of Quebec set up a Public Consultation on Living Conditions of Seniors. Fifty sessions were held in 26 cities across all 17 regions of the province. More than 4000 seniors attended the sessions and 275 briefs were received from scientists and associations. Three themes were identified in the report published in 2008: supporting seniors and their caregivers, reinforcing the place of seniors in society, and preventing problems associated with aging (suicide, abuse, addictions). The main actions that I recommended included: Increasing the Guaranteed Income Supplement to prevent poverty; Modifying pension plans and working conditions to allow for progressive retirement; Making a major investment in home care to provide access to services regardless of place of residence; Introducing an Autonomy Support Benefit and autonomy insurance program for financing services to support people with disabilities; Generalizing an Integrated Service Delivery Network providing services to frail older people; Better training for professionals in gerontology. I also recommended setting up a National Policy on Seniors to align all government departments and agencies, municipalities and the private sector around a vision, objectives and a set of actions for improving the integration of seniors in an aging society. This would contribute to a more equitable, interdependent and wiser society. Unfortunately, the Government did not support these recommendations. It is now time for scientists to get involved in leading policy on seniors and in the political arena.
PubMed ID
20922350 View in PubMed
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[Basic education. Less mothering--more responsibility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230944
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1989 Apr 26;89(17):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-1989
Author
G. Kjaergaard
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1989 Apr 26;89(17):4-7
Date
Apr-26-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Education, Nursing - trends
Humans
Social Responsibility
Students, Nursing
Teaching - methods
PubMed ID
2749573 View in PubMed
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[Being together is better than medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223772
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 20-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1992
Author
G. Kjaergaard
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 20-1
Date
May-20-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Humans
Primary Health Care
Self Care
PubMed ID
1455331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys, 1987-1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51830
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mette Kjøller
Henrik Thoning
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. mk@niph.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2005 Oct;15(5):528-35
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bias (epidemiology)
Consumer Participation - trends
Denmark
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Refusal to Participate
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The types and quantity of non-response in surveys influence the extent to which the results may be generalized. This study analysed trends in non-response in the Danish Health Interview Surveys from 1987 to 1994 and used the National Patient Registry to assess whether non-response biased the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on responders. METHODS: The data were for the 23,096 adults sampled for the Danish Health Interview Surveys in 1987, 1991 and 1994. All were followed using the National Patient Registry to obtain such information as hospital admissions. RESULTS: Non-response increased from 20.0% in 1987 to 22.6% in 1994. Four combinations of background variables characterized the non-response: gender and age; gender and civil status; county of residence and age; survey year and age. Non-respondents and respondents had identical gender- and age-standardized hospital admission rates for approximately 5 years before and 2 years after data collection, but non-respondents had a significantly higher rate immediately before and during data collection. Admissions rates were analysed according to reasons for non-response. Refusers had a lower admission rate than respondents before data collection but similar during and after data collection. The rate was higher during the whole period among ill or disabled non-respondents. Among people who could not be contacted during the data collection period a higher admission rate was only found immediately before and during data collection. CONCLUSIONS: Although admission rates differed between respondents and non-respondents these differences were too small to bias the estimated population prevalence of morbidity when solely based on respondents.
PubMed ID
16051660 View in PubMed
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Citizen Personas: Exploring Challenges of Citizen-Centric eHealth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277534
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Lone Stub Petersen
Pernille Bertelsen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;210:582-6
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation - methods
Denmark
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Models, organizational
Patient Participation
Telemedicine - organization & administration
Abstract
Within the field of eHealth, there is a shift towards a patient perspective. However, the focus on the patient often fails to acknowledge and achieve a citizen-centric perspective because there is a lack of understanding of the context and complexities of the person and her relations, interests and activities. In this paper we use the persona of 'Citizen Hanne' for two purposes. Firstly, to highlight and provide detail in the understanding of the citizen perspective and thereby facilitate a shift towards a citizen-centric perspective, which is advanced by many in the field of eHealth. Secondly, we want to further nourish a critical goal of highlighting the challenges in doing citizen-centric eHealth and pointing out the barriers for reaching this goal.
PubMed ID
25991215 View in PubMed
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[Citizens' health. Interview by Grethe Kjaergaard].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223770
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1992
Author
E H Christensen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1992 May 20;92(21):suppl 4-6
Date
May-20-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Advocacy
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Humans
Primary Health Care
PubMed ID
1455333 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community participation after spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164345
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Apr;88(4):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Christine Carpenter
Susan J Forwell
Lyn E Jongbloed
Catherine L Backman
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy and Dietetics, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK. c.carpenter@coventry.ac.uk
Source
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2007 Apr;88(4):427-33
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Patient Participation
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Spinal Cord Injuries - psychology - rehabilitation
Transportation
Abstract
To describe participation among a community-based sample of adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the relationship between participation and life satisfaction.
Survey.
Community.
A sample of 357 people (response rate, 44%) with SCI recruited through the British Columbia Paraplegic Association. The mean age +/- standard deviation was 46.0+/-14.7 years, mean time since SCI was 13.0+/-11.0 years, and 68% of the respondents were men.
Not applicable.
Descriptive survey data on community participation specifically related to social involvement, physical activity and relationship with others, transportation, and community access. Life satisfaction and happiness assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale and Happiness Scale.
No limitations to participation were experienced by 18.5% of the respondents. Satisfaction with transportation was associated with owning one's own vehicle (P
PubMed ID
17398242 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.