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Community action success in public health: are we using a ruler to measure a sphere?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194794
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):90-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M A Boutilier
E. Rajkumar
B D Poland
S. Tobin
R F Badgley
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto. marie.boutilier@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):90-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consumer Participation
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Program Evaluation - methods
Public Health Practice - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Community Action and Public Health study explored how Ontario public health practitioners interpret and implement guidance in community action. In-depth interviews were conducted with 107 public health professionals and community members in 6 Ontario health units. This report briefly describes the study methods and presents results pertaining to the measurement of success based on interviews with 67 public health professionals. Data substantiate the view that evaluation methodologies employing quantitative measures of epidemiological outcomes inadequately capture "success" in community action, possibly attributable to an unproductive dichotomization of "process" and "outcome". Results suggest two kinds of "success": a) changes related to stated goals and targets; and b) more iterative and process-oriented changes, including necessary but often undocumented shifts in relationships, structures, social conditions and processes. In order to legitimize and validate results that might otherwise pass unrecognized, we suggest a methodology that records project "milestones" as successes in their own right.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):87-911338158
PubMed ID
11338160 View in PubMed
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