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Community action success in public health: are we using a ruler to measure a sphere?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194794
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):90-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M A Boutilier
E. Rajkumar
B D Poland
S. Tobin
R F Badgley
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto. marie.boutilier@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):90-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Consumer Participation
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Program Evaluation - methods
Public Health Practice - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
The Community Action and Public Health study explored how Ontario public health practitioners interpret and implement guidance in community action. In-depth interviews were conducted with 107 public health professionals and community members in 6 Ontario health units. This report briefly describes the study methods and presents results pertaining to the measurement of success based on interviews with 67 public health professionals. Data substantiate the view that evaluation methodologies employing quantitative measures of epidemiological outcomes inadequately capture "success" in community action, possibly attributable to an unproductive dichotomization of "process" and "outcome". Results suggest two kinds of "success": a) changes related to stated goals and targets; and b) more iterative and process-oriented changes, including necessary but often undocumented shifts in relationships, structures, social conditions and processes. In order to legitimize and validate results that might otherwise pass unrecognized, we suggest a methodology that records project "milestones" as successes in their own right.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):87-911338158
PubMed ID
11338160 View in PubMed
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Family, friend or foe? Critical reflections on the relevance and role of social capital in health promotion and community development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175346
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jun;60(12):2819-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Sarah E L Wakefield
Blake Poland
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Toronto, Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3G3. sarah.wakefield@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Jun;60(12):2819-32
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Social Change
Social Environment
Abstract
Social capital has been the focus of considerable academic and policy interest in recent years. Despite this interest, the concept remains undertheorized: there is an urgent need for a critical engagement with this literature that goes beyond summary. This paper lays a foundation for a critical dialogue between social capital and health promotion, by examining problematics in the conceptualization and practice of social capital building and linking these to models of community development, a cornerstone health promotion strategy. In so doing, the paper contributes to the existing literature by providing a theoretical exposition and critique of various threads in social capital discourse, and linking these threads explicitly to community development practice. Distinctions between communitarian, institutional and critical approaches to social capital are elaborated, and the relationships between these three approaches and three models of community development-social planning, locality development, and social action-are discussed. The existing social capital literature is then critically examined in relation to three key themes common to both literatures: community integration, public participation, and power relations. This examination suggests that social capital cannot be conceived in isolation from economic and political structures, since social connections are contingent on, and structured by, access to material resources. This runs counter to many current policy discourses, which focus on the importance of connection and cohesion without addressing fundamental inequities in access to resources. This paper posits that approaches to community development and social capital should emphasise the importance of a conscious concern with social justice. A construction of social capital which explicitly endorses the importance of transformative social engagement, while at the same time recognising the potential negative consequences of social capital development, could help community organizers build communities in ways that truly promote health.
PubMed ID
15820589 View in PubMed
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Laying the groundwork for broadly based partnerships: the perceived influence of the National Forum on Breast Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208231
Source
Cancer Prev Control. 1997 Jun;1(2):141-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997

"Playing on shifting sand": reflections on the impact of political shifts on community action and public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194796
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):87-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
M A Boutilier
R F Badgley
B D Poland
S. Tobin
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Toronto. marie.boutilier@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):87-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Research
Humans
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Politics
Public Health Practice
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):90-411338160
PubMed ID
11338158 View in PubMed
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Reaching for environmental health justice: Canadian experiences for a comprehensive research, policy and advocacy agenda in health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142294
Source
Health Promot Int. 2010 Dec;25(4):453-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Jeffrey R Masuda
Blake Poland
Jamie Baxter
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Geography, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. jeff_masuda@umanitoba.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2010 Dec;25(4):453-63
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community-Based Participatory Research
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Advocacy
Consumer Participation
Environmental Health - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Social Justice
Abstract
Spatial disparities in environmental quality and practices are contributing to rising health inequalities worldwide. To date, the field of health promotion has not contributed as significantly as it might to a systematic analysis of the physical environment as a determinant of health nor to a critique of inequitable environmental governance practices responsible for social injustice-particularly in the Canadian context. In this paper, we explore ways in which health promotion and environmental justice perspectives can be combined into an integrated movement for environmental health justice in health promotion. Drawing on Canadian experiences, we describe the historical contributions and limitations of each perspective in research, policy and particularly professional practice. We then demonstrate how recent environmental justice research in Canada is moving toward a deeper and multi-level analysis of environmental health inequalities, a development that we believe can inform a comprehensive research, policy and advocacy agenda in health promotion toward environmental health justice as a fundamental determinant of health. Lastly, we propose four key considerations for health promotion professionals to consider in advancing this movement.
PubMed ID
20615911 View in PubMed
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