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The changing role and legitimate boundaries of epidemiology: community-based prevention programmes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235761
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(6):589-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(6):589-98
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Community Health Services
Consumer Participation
Epidemiology
Health education
Humans
Preventive Health Services
Public Health
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiology is the basic science of public health. It combines medical and social sciences, both of which are developing with new inventions. Therefore, the role of epidemiology and its boundaries are also changing over time. An important role of epidemiology is to develop and implement community-based control programmes for major diseases in the community. Such programmes are essential for large scale public health policy. It is necessary that epidemiological research can as freely as possible test new methods of disease prevention and health promotion. The first community-based control programme for cardiovascular diseases, the North Karelia Project is reviewed against this background. At present, it is still possible to define the boundaries of epidemiology geographically and culturally, but in the future, however, it will become more difficult. There is no doubt that epidemiology will remain as the basic science of public health but the scope of public health problems are growing much wider. These include the prevention of the final epidemic--the destruction of our planet by nuclear bombs. In the control of the existing epidemics and in the prevention of new ones the boundaries of epidemiology cannot stay rigid but they must be changing as new facts about the emerging public health problems are identified.
PubMed ID
3686092 View in PubMed
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Community-based strategies to fight smoking. Experiences from the North Karelia project in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241404
Source
N Y State J Med. 1983 Dec;83(13):1335-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983

Impact of mass media and interpersonal health communication on smoking cessation attempts: a study in North Karelia, 1989-1996.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197322
Source
J Health Commun. 1998 Apr-Jun;3(2):105-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Korhonen
A. Uutela
H J Korhonen
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Mannerheimintie, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Health Commun. 1998 Apr-Jun;3(2):105-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Consumer Participation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Persuasive Communication
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation
Abstract
This article summarizes an impact evaluation of the North Karelia Project (Finnish CINDI program) on smoking cessation attempts. During the period 1989-1996, data were collected by annual surveys, with response rates varying from 66% to 76%. This study included 1,694 adult current smokers or persons who had quit smoking during the past year, out of a total of 6,011 respondents. Smoking cessation attempts during the past 12 months were examined as a dependent variable. Reported exposures to mass media and interpersonal health communication were examined as possible determinants of smoking cessation. Weekly exposure to mass media health messages was significantly associated with cessation attempts among men only. In contrast, interpersonal health communication, or social influence, was a significant determinant of cessation attempts among both sexes. Exposure to both mass media and interpersonal health communication had an even stronger impact on cessation attempts. Thus, interpersonal communication appears to be an important catalyst of community programs, and its inclusion should be emphasized to obtain a higher impact with community programs.
PubMed ID
10977248 View in PubMed
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Theory and action for health promotion illustrations from the North Karelia Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243745
Source
Am J Public Health. 1982 Jan;72(1):43-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1982
Author
A. McAlister
P. Puska
J T Salonen
J. Tuomilehto
K. Koskela
Source
Am J Public Health. 1982 Jan;72(1):43-50
Date
Jan-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Smoking
Time Factors
Abstract
The North Karelia Project in Finland illustrates the fundamental goals of health promotion. Specific activities of the project serve as examples of how concepts from the social and behavioral sciences can be applied to achieve estimated reductions in predicted risk of disease. The results in North Karelia are not conclusive, but they are encouraging, and the investigations conducted there is an essential reference for future research in health promotion and disease prevention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7053618 View in PubMed
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