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Bringing 'the public' into health technology assessment and coverage policy decisions: from principles to practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167360
Source
Health Policy. 2007 Jun;82(1):37-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Julia Abelson
Mita Giacomini
Pascale Lehoux
Francois-Pierre Gauvin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Health Sciences Centre, Hamilton Ontario, Canada. abelsonj@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2007 Jun;82(1):37-50
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Humans
Insurance Coverage
National health programs - organization & administration
Policy Making
Quebec
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
Those making health care coverage decisions rely on health technology assessment (HTA) for crucial technical information. But coverage decision-making, and the HTA that informs it, are also inherently political. They involve the values and judgments of a range of stakeholders as well as the public. Moreover, governments are politically accountable for their resource allocation decisions. Canadian policy makers are at an early stage in the design of legitimate mechanisms for the public to contribute to, and to be apprised of, HTA and coverage decisions. As they consider the options, questions arise about whom to involve (e.g., which publics), how to engage them (e.g., through what public involvement or accountability mechanisms), and for what purpose (e.g., to inform the public of decisions and their rationales, or to have the public directly affect those decisions). Often key concepts, such as the difference between public accountability and public participation, are not well articulated or distinguished in these debates. Guidance is needed regarding both rationales and methods for involving the public in HTA and technology coverage decisions. We offer a framework that clearly distinguishes specific roles for the public, and relates them to several layers of policy analysis and policy making where 'the public' may engage in different tasks. The framework offers a menu of choices for policy makers contemplating changes to public involvement, as well as a model that can be used to characterize and analyze different approaches across jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
16996637 View in PubMed
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"It all depends": conceptualizing public involvement in the context of health technology assessment agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97801
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 May;70(10):1518-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Francois-Pierre Gauvin
Julia Abelson
Mita Giacomini
John Eyles
John N Lavis
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Sante Publique du Quebec, National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy, 945 avenue Wolfe, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. fpgauvin@gmail.com
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 May;70(10):1518-26
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Technology - standards
Canada
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Government Agencies - organization & administration
Great Britain
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Policy Making
Technology Assessment, Biomedical - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
There have been calls in recent years for greater public involvement in health technology assessment (HTA). Yet the concept of public involvement is poorly articulated and little attention has been paid to the context of HTA agencies. This article investigates how public involvement is conceptualized in the HTA agency environment. Using qualitative concept analysis methods, we reviewed the HTA literature and the websites of HTA agencies and conducted semi-structured interviews with informants in Canada, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Our analysis reveals that HTA agencies' role as bridges or boundary organizations situated at the frontier of research and policymaking causes the agencies to struggle with the idea of public involvement. The HTA community is concerned with conceptualizing public involvement in such a way as to meet scientific and methodological standards without neglecting its responsibilities to healthcare policymakers. We offer a conceptual tool for analyzing the nature of public involvement across agencies, characterizing different domains, levels of involvement, and types of publics.
PubMed ID
20207061 View in PubMed
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Moving cautiously: Public involvement and the health technology assessment community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137652
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2011 Jan;27(1):43-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
François-Pierre Gauvin
Julia Abelson
Mita Giacomini
John Eyles
John N Lavis
Author Affiliation
Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Quebec G1V 5B3, Canada. francois-pierre.gauvin@inspq.qc.ca
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2011 Jan;27(1):43-9
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Denmark
Great Britain
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
This study explores the factors that enhance or reduce the prospects for public involvement in the activities of health technology assessment (HTA) agencies.
The analytical framework for this study is based on the work of John W. Kingdon, which provides a comprehensive synthesis of the factors influencing governments and public organizations' agenda. The study draws insights from forty-two semistructured telephone interviews with informants involved in international HTA networks and/or in HTA agencies in Canada, Denmark, and the United Kingdom.
This exploratory study suggests that the HTA community is moving toward greater public involvement. However, the HTA community remains cautious and ambivalent about the technical feasibility of public involvement, its acceptability to policy makers and practitioners, and its impacts on HTA agencies' resources and procedures.
The study stresses the importance of conducting rigorous and compelling evaluations to inform HTA agencies' decision to adopt, or reject, public involvement practices.
PubMed ID
21262071 View in PubMed
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