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The planning and implementation of government-sponsored community-based primary prevention: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215592
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J C Sylvestre
S M Pancer
K. Brophy
G. Cameron
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, ON.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):189-95
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Consumer Participation - legislation & jurisprudence
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Female
Health Plan Implementation - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Planning Technical Assistance - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Humans
Infant
Interprofessional Relations
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Abstract
Governments at all levels have become increasingly involved in initiating and funding projects within which community residents work collaboratively with local service providers in the development of programs for the betterment of themselves, their families, and their community. Inherent in these initiatives, however, are a number of possible sources of tension which, left unresolved, may hamper the intentions of governments to seed grass-roots solutions to community problems. A qualitative research methodology was used to examine the nature of the relationship between government and community representatives (both residents and local service providers) in establishing community-based primary prevention programs under the auspices of the Better Beginnings, Better Futures initiative of the Government of Ontario. We examine a number of issues and tensions that have arisen from this project, both during the development of the program model by the government, and through to its implementation in several communities in the province.
PubMed ID
10151075 View in PubMed
Less detail

Resident participation in the Better Beginnings, Better Futures prevention project: Part II--Factors that facilitate and hinder involvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215590
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):213-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
G. Cameron
L. Peirson
S M Pancer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Welfare Studies, Wilfrid Laurie University, Waterloo, ON.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):213-27
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services
Consumer Participation
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Female
Health Plan Implementation
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Resident participation is the cornerstone of any community-based prevention program. However, many challenges exist which make it difficult to involve residents in a meaningful way in the development of such programs. How can programs be organized so as to provide for significant participation of community residents in the process of program development? This article outlines the procedures that were utilized in seven community-based prevention programs established under the Better Beginnings, Better Futures initiative of the Government of Ontario to enlist the participation of community residents in program decision making and implementation.
PubMed ID
10151077 View in PubMed
Less detail

Resident participation in the Better Beginnings, Better Futures prevention project: Part I--The impacts of involvement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215591
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):197-211
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S M Pancer
G. Cameron
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1994;13(2):197-211
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Symptoms - prevention & control
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - prevention & control
Child, Preschool
Community Mental Health Services - economics
Consumer Participation
Consumer Satisfaction
Developmental Disabilities - prevention & control
Early Intervention (Education) - economics
Female
Financing, Government
Health Plan Implementation - economics
Humans
Infant
Learning Disorders - prevention & control
Male
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Abstract
What impact does the involvement of community residents in developing prevention programs have on the residents themselves, the programs they help to create, and the communities in which they live? The research literature suggests that resident involvement in program decision making can enhance residents' sense of control or empowerment, improve programs and services, and provide a better match between the needs of the community and the kinds of services provided. Much of this literature, however, has focused on relatively few of the benefits and costs that residents can experience as a result of their involvement. The investigation reported in this paper utilized a qualitative research methodology to discover the outcomes, both positive and negative, that residents derive from their involvement. Prevention programs operating in seven Ontario communities under the auspices of the Better Beginnings, Better Futures primary prevention initiative are featured in the discussion.
PubMed ID
10151076 View in PubMed
Less detail