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A snapshot of community-based research in Canada: Who? What? Why? How?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164983
Source
Health Educ Res. 2008 Feb;23(1):106-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Sarah Flicker
Beth Savan
Brian Kolenda
Matto Mildenberger
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, 4700 Keele Street, 244 HNES, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3. Flicker@yorku.ca
Source
Health Educ Res. 2008 Feb;23(1):106-14
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavioral Research - organization & administration
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation - methods
Consumer Satisfaction
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Universities - organization & administration
Abstract
Community-Based Research (CBR) is rapidly gaining recognitions as an important tool in addressing complex environmental, health and social problems. However, little is known about the Canadian CBR context. A web-based survey including 25 questions was circulated on list-servs and via targeted e-mails to investigate the status of CBR in Canada. Univariate and bivariate statistical analyses were performed to examine variables and relationships of interest. Our sample included a cross-section of CBR community and academic practitioners (n = 308). Respondents reported a wide range of project foci, experience, operating budgets and reasons for engaging in their last CBR endeavor. Academic partners were perceived to be most involved at all stages of the research process except dissemination. Service providers were also perceived as being very involved in most stages of research. Community members were substantially less engaged. High levels of satisfaction were reported for both CBR processes and outcomes. Respondents reported a number of positive outcomes as a result of their research endeavors, including changes in both agency and government policies and programs. Our study shows that CBR practitioners are engaged in research on a wide array of Canadian health and social issues that is making a difference. Finding appropriate levels of participation for community members in CBR remains an ongoing challenge.
PubMed ID
17322572 View in PubMed
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Volunteer environmental monitoring and the role of the universities: the case of Citizens' Environment Watch.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185607
Source
Environ Manage. 2003 May;31(5):561-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Beth Savan
Alexis J Morgan
Christopher Gore
Author Affiliation
Environmental Studies, Innis College, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. b.savan@utoronto.ca
Source
Environ Manage. 2003 May;31(5):561-8
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants
Humans
Private Sector
Universities
Volunteers
Abstract
Universities can provide a stable home for launching collaborative community research projects. Citizens' Environment Watch (CEW), an environmental monitoring initiative based at the University of Toronto, has made significant contributions to environmental education and stewardship in Ontario, Canada. Following dramatic cuts in provincial monitoring programs, citizens and youth have used chemical parameters and biological indicators to gauge water and air quality, and to identify areas requiring remediation and pollution prevention efforts. The relationship of Citizens' Environment Watch to government agencies, funders and other grassroots environmental groups has evolved over the past 5 years as CEW attempts to remain effective without taking on the investigative and enforcement roles to support the regulatory enforcement that has been largely abandoned by government. We explore the challenges inherent in developing and maintaining a volunteer organization that carries out rigorous and useful scientific work and we outline the ability of a university to help overcome these critical challenges. Finally, we present lessons learned for the benefit of other citizen and youth monitoring projects.
PubMed ID
12719888 View in PubMed
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