Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Public participation for women's health: strange bedfellows or partners in a cause?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173838
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 May;26(5):398-421
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Wilfreda E Thurston
Ardene Robinson Vollman
Lynn M Meadows
Erin Rutherford
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. thurston@ucalgary.ca
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2005 May;26(5):398-421
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Consumer Participation - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making, Organizational
Female
Health Policy
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Program Evaluation
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
A major focus of health system reform in Canada has been the regionalization of health services administration. With a goal of bringing decision-making closer to the community, there has been a commitment to public participation in planning by some health authorities. Women, however, often feel that their participation is minimal or their needs are not addressed. During regionalization of the Alberta health system, the Calgary Health Region (CHR) negotiated an agreement with the Salvation Army to provide women's health services through the Grace Women's Health Centre, a major part of the region's women's health program. We present a case study exploring the process and final agreement and the impact of this agreement on women's participation in health policy development. The historical context and the nature and impact of the agreement are described and several participation strategies that occurred within the partnership are discussed. The development of a formal partnership agreement, a governance model, was a success for public participation in this case; however, the greatest success for women was maintenance of a political space in which women's health as a priority could be discussed in a context where the forces against gender equity talk are strong.
PubMed ID
16020006 View in PubMed
Less detail

The role of the media in public participation: framing and leading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172209
Source
Women Health. 2005;41(4):101-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Wilfreda E Thurston
Erin Rutherford
Lynn M Meadows
Ardene Robinson Vollman
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. thurston@ucalgary.ca
Source
Women Health. 2005;41(4):101-22
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Consumer Participation - trends
Female
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mass Media
Newspapers
Public Opinion
Public Policy
Women's health
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article focuses on the framing of women's health services in the context of restructuring dictated by health system regionalization. By examining the archives of a local newspaper and the minutes and documents of one of the key organizations involved in restructuring after regionalization, it was possible to examine the public discourse of the time and subsequently the journalists' and the readerships' understandings of women's health. The evidence suggests that the Salvation Army was instrumental in setting the tone that was taken by the media in framing the issues around the closure and move of its Grace Women's Health Centre. While the Calgary Health Region was successful in bringing the Grace under its mandate and organizational control, it was the Salvation Army, with its highly visible and powerful fundraising arm and its advocacy for holistic women's health that caught the public's attention. The internal discourse tracked some of the emerging issues, known only to those involved at managerial levels within the health system, but the public discourse kept women centered in decisions regarding the partnership. Women from many constituencies must continue to participate in the public policy realm to ensure that women's health remains an issue in health reform.
PubMed ID
16260416 View in PubMed
Less detail