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Public engagement in setting priorities in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156398
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jul 1;179(1):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2008
Author
Rebecca A Bruni
Andreas Laupacis
Douglas K Martin
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. rebecca.bruni@utoronto.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Jul 1;179(1):15-8
Date
Jul-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Canada
Consumer Participation
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Public Opinion
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 18;179(11):1174-519015569
PubMed ID
18591516 View in PubMed
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Public involvement in the priority setting activities of a wait time management initiative: a qualitative case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160274
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Rebecca A Bruni
Andreas Laupacis
Wendy Levinson
Douglas K Martin
Author Affiliation
Joint Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. rebecca.bruni@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:186
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Health Care Rationing
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Planning Techniques
Policy Making
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Qualitative Research
Regional Health Planning
Risk Management
Social Responsibility
Time Management
Waiting Lists
Abstract
As no health system can afford to provide all possible services and treatments for the people it serves, each system must set priorities. Priority setting decision makers are increasingly involving the public in policy making. This study focuses on public engagement in a key priority setting context that plagues every health system around the world: wait list management. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting for the Ontario Wait Time Strategy, with special attention to public engagement.
This study was conducted at the Ontario Wait Time Strategy in Ontario, Canada which is part of a Federal-Territorial-Provincial initiative to improve access and reduce wait times in five areas: cancer, cardiac, sight restoration, joint replacements, and diagnostic imaging. There were two sources of data: (1) over 25 documents (e.g. strategic planning reports, public updates), and (2) 28 one-on-one interviews with informants (e.g. OWTS participants, MOHLTC representatives, clinicians, patient advocates). Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation.
The Ontario Wait Time Strategy partially meets the four conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness'. The public was not directly involved in the priority setting activities of the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy.
We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18021393 View in PubMed
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