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308 records – page 1 of 31.

Accelerating client-driven care: pilot study for a social interaction approach to knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155589
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Carol L McWilliam
Anita Kothari
Beverly Leipert
Catherine Ward-Griffin
Dorothy Forbes
Mary Lou King
Marita Kloseck
Karen Ferguson
Abram Oudshoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. cmcwill@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2008 Jun;40(2):58-74
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consumer Participation
Diffusion of Innovation
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Group Processes
Health Planning Councils
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Abstract
This study piloted a knowledge translation (KT) intervention promoting evidence-based home care through social interaction. A total of 33 providers organized into 5 heterogeneous, geographically defined action groups participated in 5 researcher-facilitated meetings based on the participatory action model. The KT evidence reflects an empowering partnership approach to service delivery. Exploratory investigation included quantitative pre-post measurement of outcomes and qualitative description of data, presented herein. The critical reflections of the groups reveal macro-, meso-, and micro-level barriers to and facilitators of KT as well as recommendations for achieving KT. Insights gleaned from the findings have informed the evolution of the KT intervention to engage all 3 levels in addressing barriers and facilitators, with a conscious effort to transcend "push" and "pull" tendencies and enact transformative leadership. The findings suggest the merit of a more prolonged longitudinal investigation with expanded participation.
PubMed ID
18714898 View in PubMed
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Accounting for expected attrition in the planning of community intervention trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166860
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Jun 15;26(13):2615-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2007
Author
Monica Taljaard
Allan Donner
Neil Klar
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Health Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada. mtaljaard@ohri.ca
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Jun 15;26(13):2615-28
Date
Jun-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cluster analysis
Consumer Participation
Humans
Models, Statistical
Patient Dropouts - statistics & numerical data
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Sample Size
Abstract
Trials in which intact communities are the units of randomization are increasingly being used to evaluate interventions which are more naturally administered at the community level, or when there is a substantial risk of treatment contamination. In this article we focus on the planning of community intervention trials in which k communities (for example, medical practices, worksites, or villages) are to be randomly allocated to each of an intervention and a control group, and fixed cohorts of m individuals enrolled in each community prior to randomization. Formulas to determine k or m may be obtained by adjusting standard sample size formulas to account for the intracluster correlation coefficient rho. In the presence of individual-level attrition however, observed cohort sizes are likely to vary. We show that conventional approaches of accounting for potential attrition, such as dividing standard sample size formulas by the anticipated follow-up rate pi or using the average anticipated cohort size m pi, may, respectively, overestimate or underestimate the required sample size when cluster follow-up rates are highly variable, and m or rho are large. We present new sample size estimation formulas for the comparison of two means or two proportions, which appropriately account for variation among cluster follow-up rates. These formulas are derived by specifying a model for the binary missingness indicators under the population-averaged approach, assuming an exchangeable intracluster correlation coefficient, denoted by tau. To aid in the planning of future trials, we recommend that estimates for tau be reported in published community intervention trials.
PubMed ID
17068842 View in PubMed
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Addressing the realities [correction of realties] of health care in northern aboriginal communities through participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175481
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Author Affiliation
Center for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. bruce.minore@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - economics - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Rural Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
To address concerns about disruptions in the continuity of health care delivered to residents in three remote aboriginal communities in northern Ontario, Canada, the local health authority initiated a study in collaboration with the department of Health Canada responsible for ensuring that aboriginal reserves receive mandatory health services, and an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from two universities. The study focussed on the delivery of oncology, diabetes and mental health care, specifically, as well as systems issues such as recruitment and retention of health human resources and financial costs. The paper discusses the procedures involved, the benefits derived and the challenges encountered in doing this as a community driven participatory action research project. It also summarizes the findings that led to community formulated policy and program recommendations.
PubMed ID
15801551 View in PubMed
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Advocacy and activism. Supervised injection facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186145
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Fiona Gold
Author Affiliation
AIDS/STD Prevention Street Nurse Program, British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.
Source
Can Nurse. 2003 Feb;99(2):14-8
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Consumer Participation
Drug Overdose - prevention & control
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Humans
Preventive Health Services
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - nursing - virology
PubMed ID
12656011 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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All components of the system must be aligned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184914
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J E Turnball
Author Affiliation
National Patient Safety Foundation,Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation
Safety Management - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Abstract
A culture of safety in healthcare will not be achieved until the fragmentation that currently characterizes the delivery system is replaced by an alignment of the many component parts, including providers, patients and their families and front-line workers on the "sharp end'--physicians, nurses and pharmacists. A systemic approach should be introduced that would recognize the interacting nature of the delivery system's component parts, and that a change in one component of the system will provoke a change in another part. Consumers and their families can be empowered through programs that raise awareness, prevent error and mitigate its effect when error does happen. Within the system, the "safety sciences' can provide guides to effective work processes. Finally, it is critical to capture knowledge of what type of error occurs in what place and to elucidate strategies to prevent the error.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):10-3112811154
PubMed ID
12811156 View in PubMed
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Americans must have the right to purchase prescription drugs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184600
Source
Md Med. 2003;4(2):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernard Sanders
Author Affiliation
Bernie@mail.house.gov
Source
Md Med. 2003;4(2):45-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Cost Savings
Drug Prescriptions - economics
Humans
Prescription Fees
Travel
United States
PubMed ID
12847829 View in PubMed
Less detail

An activity-theoretical method for studying user participation in IS design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183365
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S. Hyysalo
J. Lehenkari
Author Affiliation
Center for Activity Theory and Developmental Work Research, Department of Education, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 47 FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. sampsa.hyysalo@helsinki.fi
Source
Methods Inf Med. 2003;42(4):398-404
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Consumer Participation
Databases as Topic - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Disease Management
Finland
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
Software Design
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
This paper aims to present an activity-theoretical method for studying the effects of user participation in IS development.
This method is developed through a case study of the process of designing a diabetes database.
The method consists of a historical analysis of the design process, an ethnographical study of the use of the database, and researcher-driven interventions into the on-going user-producer interaction. In the historical analysis, we study particularly which user groups of the database have influenced the design work and which perspectives need to be incorporated into the design in the near future. An analytical model consisting of perspectives on local design, particular technology, and societal domain is introduced as a conceptual tool for this analysis. We also introduce the possibility of employing the historical analysis in guiding an ethnographical study of the user sites and researcher-driven interventions, which provide the participants with tools for improving their design process.
PubMed ID
14534640 View in PubMed
Less detail

308 records – page 1 of 31.