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790 records – page 1 of 79.

Consumer involvement in seafood as family meals in Norway: an application of the expectancy-value approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195456
Source
Appetite. 2001 Apr;36(2):173-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S O Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Science and Marketing, The Norwegian College of Fishery Science, University of Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Appetite. 2001 Apr;36(2):173-86
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Aged
Animals
Attitude
Consumer Participation - psychology
Diet Surveys
Eating
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Norway
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Seafood
Social Environment
Social Responsibility
Abstract
A theoretical model of involvement in consumption of food products was tested in a representative survey of Norwegian households for the particular case of consuming seafood as a common family meal. The empirical study is based on using structural equation approach to test construct validity of measures and the empirical fit of the theoretical model. Attitudes, negative feelings, social norms and moral obligation were proved to be important, reliable and different constructs and explained 63% of the variation in seafood involvement. Negative feelings and moral obligation was the most important antecedents of involvement. Both our proposed model and modified model with seafood involvement as a mediator fit well with the data and proved our expectations in a promising way.
PubMed ID
11237353 View in PubMed
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Identifying and prioritizing gaming workers' health and safety concerns using mapping for data collection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196146
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2001 Jan;39(1):42-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
M M Keith
B. Cann
J T Brophy
D. Hellyer
M. Day
S. Egan
K. Mayville
A. Watterson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health and Community Studies, DeMontfort University, Leicester, UK. mkeith@ohcow.on.ca
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2001 Jan;39(1):42-51
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Female
Focus Groups
Follow-Up Studies
Gambling
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects
Health Priorities
Human Engineering
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Ontario
Safety
Safety Management
Stress, Physiological - etiology - prevention & control
Temperature
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Workplace
Abstract
This research was prompted by the clinical presentation of workers from a variety of gaming occupations with injuries and illnesses and multiple health and safety concerns.
Using participatory action research principles, 51 gaming workers in Ontario and 20 gaming workers in Manitoba were consulted during a series of focus group sessions. Mapping exercises were used to survey the participants about their health concerns, perceived occupational hazards and the impact of working conditions on their personal lives. Participants were then asked to prioritize their concerns and make recommendations for improvements.
Gaming workers from both provinces identified similar health, hazard and psycho-social concerns. They prioritized the issues of stress, ergonomics, indoor air quality (including second-hand smoke and temperature), biological hazards, physical hazards and noise.
This study points to a need to more fully investigate and address health and safety issues in the gaming industry. It also demonstrates the effectiveness of a worker-driven, participatory consultation.
PubMed ID
11148014 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Reflect Nurs Leadersh. 2003;29(2):26-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

Americans must have the right to purchase prescription drugs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184600
Source
Md Med. 2003;4(2):45-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Bernard Sanders
Author Affiliation
Bernie@mail.house.gov
Source
Md Med. 2003;4(2):45-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Cost Savings
Drug Prescriptions - economics
Humans
Prescription Fees
Travel
United States
PubMed ID
12847829 View in PubMed
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Development of a public participation and communication protocol for establishing fish consumption advisories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184714
Source
Risk Anal. 2003 Jun;23(3):461-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Cynthia G Jardine
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, 302 Human Ecology Building, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2N1, Canada. cindy.jardine@ualberta.ca
Source
Risk Anal. 2003 Jun;23(3):461-71
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Communication
Consumer Participation
Eating
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Risk Management
Trust
Abstract
Enabling people to make an informed choice on whether to change consumption behavior is ultimately the objective of any fish consumption advisory. This will occur only if people are aware of the advisory, know and understand the advisory information, and believe the information to be true. Interactive, meaningful communication and the opportunity to participate in the process to develop and review advisories are key to achieving these attributes. A case study was undertaken in a community in Alberta, Canada (where an existing advisory was under consideration for review) to determine public awareness, knowledge, compliance, communication effectiveness, information needs, and desire for involvement related to the advisory. The information obtained from this case study was used to develop 14 guiding principles as a foundation for the incorporation of public participation and risk communication into the process of developing and reviewing fish consumption advisories.
PubMed ID
12836839 View in PubMed
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Survey of consumer and non-consumer mental health service providers on assertive community treatment teams in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184715
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2003 Jun;39(3):265-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Helen White
Chantal Whelan
J Derrick Barnes
Bruce Baskerville
Author Affiliation
Carlington Community & Health Services--Assertive Community Treatment Team in Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2003 Jun;39(3):265-76
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Mental Health Services - manpower - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Patient care team
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Therapeutic Community
Abstract
Reflecting the increasing trend of consumers as providers in mental health services, the standards for Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams in Ontario, Canada require the hiring of at least 0.5 full-time equivalent consumer as a service provider. Through a mail-out survey, we explored how the consumer position has been integrated into these ACT teams. It was found that despite some variation in the roles and degree of integration of the consumers on these teams, consumers were generally well-incorporated team members with equal or better job satisfaction as compared to other employees.
PubMed ID
12836807 View in PubMed
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Can medicare be saved? Reflections from Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184890
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(3):60-7; discussion 88-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
R. Bear
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(3):60-7; discussion 88-91
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Consumer Participation
Health Care Reform
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration
Organizational Case Studies
Regional Health Planning
Social Values
State Government
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2000 Summer;1(3):9-2012811186
PubMed ID
12811193 View in PubMed
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The "Canadian model" in the international context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184894
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
M. Hirschfeld
Author Affiliation
Long-Term Care, World Health Organization, Geneva,Switzerland.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2000;1(4):103-7, discussion 109-12
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Developing Countries
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Internationality
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Poverty
Technology Transfer
World Health Organization
Abstract
The focus of this commentary is on the relevance of the Canadian experience for developing countries. It highlights the growing urgency poor countries face in preserving their major human and social capital--community solidarity and family care. Developing countries face a double burden of disease--communicable and non-communicable diseases alike, with very few, and often shrinking, resources. While poorer countries will be able to learn about the essential elements of home-based care from the examples of Canada and other industrialized countries, they do need to develop their own systems based upon their economic, social, political and cultural realities. The primary health care system would seem to provide a foundation for the provision of long-term care on a sustainable and cost-effective basis. In contrast to the often-prevailing practice in developed countries, home-based care services could be integrated into the overall health and social system. Functional disability, regardless of disease aetiology or age of the care recipient, as well as the needs of family caregivers would thus become the defining elements of service eligibility. While the question remains open as to how much poor countries can learn from the experience of others, developing countries do have the opportunity to initiate a rational process where they first provide support to communities and informal caregivers and help to maintain patients in their homes and only later develop other service elements.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2000 Fall;1(4):9-3612811170
PubMed ID
12811182 View in PubMed
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All components of the system must be aligned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184914
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J E Turnball
Author Affiliation
National Patient Safety Foundation,Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):38-43, discussion 86-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care
Decision Making, Organizational
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Patient Participation
Safety Management - organization & administration
Systems Integration
Abstract
A culture of safety in healthcare will not be achieved until the fragmentation that currently characterizes the delivery system is replaced by an alignment of the many component parts, including providers, patients and their families and front-line workers on the "sharp end'--physicians, nurses and pharmacists. A systemic approach should be introduced that would recognize the interacting nature of the delivery system's component parts, and that a change in one component of the system will provoke a change in another part. Consumers and their families can be empowered through programs that raise awareness, prevent error and mitigate its effect when error does happen. Within the system, the "safety sciences' can provide guides to effective work processes. Finally, it is critical to capture knowledge of what type of error occurs in what place and to elucidate strategies to prevent the error.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2001;2(1):10-3112811154
PubMed ID
12811156 View in PubMed
Less detail

Connecting for Health researching with community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184984
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2003;13(2):8-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

790 records – page 1 of 79.