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Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264077
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Leanne M Currie
Charlene Ronquillo
Tania Dick
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - ethnology
Computer Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Health Information - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
24943574 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Access to own health information and services on the Internet by disability pensioners and other citizens]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91436
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Halldórsdóttir Gyda
Thoroddsen Asta St
Author Affiliation
Heilsuneti ehf. gyda@heilsunet.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2008 Nov;94(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2008
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Health Information
Disabled Persons - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Research
Humans
Iceland
Insurance, Disability
Internet
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Patient Access to Records
Patient satisfaction
Pensions
Perception
Questionnaires
Social Security
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study Icelandic citizens' perception, attitude and preferences regarding access to own health information and interactive services at the State Social Security Institute of Iceland (SSSI). Hypotheses regarding differences between disability pensioners and other citizens were put forward. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive mail survey was performed with a random sample from the Icelandic population, 1400 individuals, age 16 to 67, divided into two groups of 700 each: (1) persons entitled to disability pension (2) other citizens in Iceland. The questionnaire consisted of 56 questions, descriptive statistics were used and Chi square for comparison with 95% as confidence level of significance. Response rate was 34.9%. RESULTS: Perception of rights to access own's health information was significantly higher by pensioners than other citizens. Attitude concerning impact of access was in general positive, with pensioners significantly more positive about effectiveness, perception of health, communication and decisions owing to services, access at SSSI, maintaining health records and controlling access. CONCLUSIONS: The study, the first of its kind in Iceland, supports previous research. The results, as well as foreign models of research projects, are recommended to be used for evolution of electronic health services and researching employees' viewpoints. Future research in Iceland should address the impact of interactive health communication on quality of life, health and services' efficiency.
PubMed ID
18974434 View in PubMed
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Age transcended: a semiotic and rhetorical analysis of the discourse of agelessness in North American anti-aging skin care advertisements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104666
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:20-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Kirsten L Ellison
Author Affiliation
Joint Graduate Program in Communication & Culture, 3013 TEL Centre, 88 Pond Rd., York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada. Electronic address: klelliso@ucalgary.ca.
Source
J Aging Stud. 2014 Apr;29:20-31
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advertising as Topic - methods - utilization
Aging - genetics - psychology
Attitude to Health
Beauty Culture - methods
Canada
Consumer Health Information - methods
Data Display
Humans
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Mythology - psychology
Self Concept
Skin Aging
Skin Care - methods
United States
Abstract
Drawing from a collection of over 160 North American print advertisements for anti-aging skin care products from January to December of 2009, this paper examines the discourse of agelessness, a vision of esthetic perfection and optimal health that is continually referred to by gerontologists, cultural theorists, and scientific researchers as a state of being to which humankind can aspire. Employing critical discourse analysis through the use of semiotics and visual rhetoric, this paper explores the means through which anti-aging skin care advertisements present to their viewers a particular object of desire, looking, more specifically, at how agelessness is presented as a way out and ultimate transcendence of age. Through the analytical tools of semiotics and visual rhetoric, four visions of agelessness are identified and explored in this paper: Agelessness as Scientific Purity, Agelessness as Genetic Impulse, Agelessness as Nature's Essence, and Agelessness as Myth. Whether found in the heights of scientific purity, the inner core of our genetic impulse, the depths of nature's essence, or whether agelessness itself has reached its own, untouchable, mythic status, the advertisements in this study represent one of the most pervasive vehicles through which our current vision(s) of ageless perfection are reflected, reinforced, and suspended in a drop of cream.
PubMed ID
24655670 View in PubMed
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Always stay cheerful - health information in the 1920s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298442
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
10-30-2018
Author
Erlend Hem
Rannveig Nordhagen
Per E Børdahl
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Date
10-30-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health - history
Consumer Health Information - history
Health Education - history
Health Promotion - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Mothers - education - history
Norway
Posters as Topic
Preventive Health Services - history
Public Health - history
Abstract
The interwar period was a time of comprehensive preventive health programmes in Norway. Physical exercise, nutritious diets, strict sleep regimens and better hygiene were at the centre of these efforts. A massive mobilisation of volunteers and professionals took place. The publication of House Maxims for Mothers and Children was part of this large-scale mobilisation, and consisted of ten posters with pithy health advice for hanging on the wall. Mothers were an important target group for health promotion.
The posters have previously received little attention in medical literature, but they can elucidate some features of life and the health propaganda of their time. We have used databases that provide access to newspapers, books and medical literature: Retriever, bokhylla.no, Oria, PubMed and Web of Science.
It is hard to quantify the effect of this popular movement when compared to political measures to improve living conditions. In any case, mortality rates fell, life expectancy increased and the dreaded communicable diseases were largely defeated. Special efforts were targeted at children, also with good results. Infant mortality fell and schoolchildren became healthier, stronger, taller and cleaner.
The line between social hygiene and general disciplining is blurred, for example the boundary between a healthy diet and bourgeois norms. The education of mothers and children also included a normative aspect that concerned good manners and control.
Notes
ErratumIn: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 Oct 31;138(19): PMID 30497256
PubMed ID
30378403 View in PubMed
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An AIDS-denialist online community on a Russian social networking service: patterns of interactions with newcomers and rhetorical strategies of persuasion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261537
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(11):e261
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Peter Meylakhs
Yuri Rykov
Olessia Koltsova
Sergey Koltsov
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2014;16(11):e261
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - psychology
Consumer Health Information
Denial (Psychology)
Humans
Information Seeking Behavior
Persuasive Communication
Russia
Social Media
Social Networking
Abstract
The rise of social media proved to be a fertile ground for the expansion of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-denialist movement (in the form of online communities). While there is substantial literature devoted to disproving AIDS-denialist views, there is a lack of studies exploring AIDS-denialists online communities that interact with an external environment.
We explored three research areas: (1) reasons for newcomers to come to an AIDS-denialist community, (2) the patterns of interactions of the community with the newcomers, and (3) rhetorical strategies that denialists use for persuasion in the veracity of their views.
We studied the largest AIDS-denialist community on one of the most popular social networking services in Russia. We used netnography as a method for collecting data for qualitative analysis and observed the community for 9 months (at least 2-3 times a week). While doing netnography, we periodically downloaded community discussions. In total, we downloaded 4821 posts and comments for analysis. Grounded theory approach was used for data analysis.
Most users came to the community for the following reasons: their stories did not fit the unitary picture of AIDS disease progression translated by popular medical discourse, health problems, concern about HIV-positive tests, and desire to dissuade community members from false AIDS beliefs. On the basis of strength in AIDS-denialist beliefs, we constructed a typology of the newcomers consisting of three ideal-typical groups: (1) convinced: those who already had become denialists before coming to the group, (2) doubters: those who were undecided about the truth of either human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) science theory or AIDS-denialist theory, and (3) orthodox: those who openly held HIV science views. Reception of a newcomer mainly depended on the newcomer's belief status. Reception was very warm for the convinced, cold or slightly hostile for the doubters, and extremely hostile or derisive for the orthodox. We identified seven main rhetorical strategies of persuasion used by the denialists on the "undecided".
Contrary to the widespread public health depiction of AIDS denialists as totally irrational, our study suggests that some of those who become AIDS denialists have sufficiently reasonable grounds to suspect that "something is wrong" with scientific theory, because their personal experience contradicts the unitary picture of AIDS disease progression. Odd and inexplicable practices of some AIDS centers only fuel these people's suspicions. We can conclude that public health practitioners' practices may play a role in generating AIDS-denialist sentiments. In interactions with the newcomers, the experienced community members highlighted the importance of personal autonomy and freedom of choice in decision making consistent with the consumerist ideology of health care. The study findings suggest that health care workers should change a one-size-fits-all mode of counseling for a more complex and patient-tailored approach, allowing for diversity of disease progression scenarios and scientific uncertainty.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25403351 View in PubMed
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An exploratory study of canadian aboriginal online health care forums.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156593
Source
Health Commun. 2008;23(3):270-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lorie Donelle
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Commun. 2008;23(3):270-81
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Health Information - methods
Humans
Internet
Population Groups
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
Internet-based discussion forums provide access to health information and social support, and serve as a resource for others. This investigation analyzed health-oriented Aboriginal Internet discussion forum (Forum A; Forum B) conversations. The findings were framed with Nutbeam's model of health literacy. Discussions within Forum B were centralized around issues of political activism and advocacy regarding Aboriginal health care. Activity in Forum A encouraged the development of "virtual" social capital, with health care discussions providing a "just-in-time" model for health education. Members of Forum A functioned as a smoking cessation self-help group and as health educators. The Internet provided a venue for the dissemination of health information and also served as a virtual voice for lifestyle coaching, political action, community building, and advocacy.
PubMed ID
18569056 View in PubMed
Less detail

An integrated multi-institutional diabetes prevention program improves knowledge and healthy food acquisition in northwestern Ontario First Nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157398
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2008 Aug;35(4):561-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Lara S Ho
Joel Gittelsohn
Rajiv Rimal
Margarita S Treuth
Sangita Sharma
Amanda Rosecrans
Stewart B Harris
Author Affiliation
Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. lho@jhsph.edu
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2008 Aug;35(4):561-73
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Health Services - methods
Consumer Health Information
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - prevention & control
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - ethnology
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
This article presents the impact results of a feasibility study in Canada for prevention of risk factors for diabetes in seven northwestern Ontario First Nations. Baseline and follow-up data were collected before and after the 9-month intervention program in schools, stores, and communities that aimed to improve diet and increase physical activity among adults. Regression analyses indicate a significant change in knowledge among respondents in intervention communities (p
PubMed ID
18456866 View in PubMed
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[A place and role of an educational component in the package of measures ensuring the populations sanitary and epidemiological welfare (in case of parasitology)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156649
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2008 Apr-Jun;(2):53-6
Publication Type
Article

Are we ready? Evidence of support mechanisms for Canadian health care workers in multi-jurisdictional emergency planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160462
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tracey L O'Sullivan
Carol A Amaratunga
Jill Hardt
Darcie Dow
Karen P Phillips
Wayne Corneil
Author Affiliation
Women's Health Research Unit, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):358-63
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Consumer Health Information
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Education, Public Health Professional
Female
Government
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Planning - organization & administration
Health Policy
Humans
Information Dissemination
Interinstitutional Relations
Male
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control - psychology
Public Health Administration - education
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
Federal, provincial and municipal leaders in Canada have adopted a culture of preparedness with the development and update of emergency plans in anticipation of different types of disasters. As evident during the 2003 global outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), it is important to provide support for health care workers (HCWs) who are vulnerable during infectious outbreak scenarios. Here we focus on the identification and evaluation of existing support mechanisms incorporated within emergency plans across various jurisdictional levels.
Qualitative content analysis of 12 emergency plans from national, provincial and municipal levels were conducted using NVIVO software. The plans were scanned and coded according to 1) informational, 2) instrumental, and 3) emotional support mechanisms for HCWs and other first responders.
Emergency plans were comprised of a predominance of informational and instrumental supports, yet few emotional or social support mechanisms. All the plans lacked gender-based analysis of how infectious disease outbreaks impact male and female HCWs differently. Acknowledgement of the need for emotional supports was evident at higher jurisdictional levels, but recommended for implementation locally.
While support mechanisms for HCWs are included in this sample of emergency plans, content analysis revealed few emotional or social supports planned for critical personnel; particularly for those who will be required to work in extremely stressful conditions under significant personal risk. The implications of transferring responsibilities for support to local and institutional jurisdictions are discussed.
PubMed ID
17985675 View in PubMed
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[Are you familiar with the poison center? Concise evidence-based information for optimal management of poisonings ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115938
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 May-Jun;9(3):28-9
Publication Type
Article

89 records – page 1 of 9.