Skip header and navigation

Refine By

44 records – page 1 of 5.

Assessment of dermal exposure to bitumen condensate among road paving and mastic crews with an observational method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134338
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2011 Jul;55(6):578-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Michela Agostini
Wouter Fransman
Frank De Vocht
Berna Van Wendel de Joode
Hans Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2011 Jul;55(6):578-90
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Construction Industry
Construction Materials
Denmark - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Floors and Floorcoverings
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Hydrocarbons - analysis
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Observation
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification
Protective Clothing - utilization
Skin
Transportation
Abstract
To assess dermal exposure to bitumen condensate among road pavers and indoor mastic workers in multiple crews using a semi-quantitative observational method [DeRmal Exposure Assessment Method (DREAM)].
Two skilled observers assessed dermal exposure to bitumen condensate among 85 asphalt workers from 12 crews from nine companies active within four European countries using the DREAM methodology, which produces an estimate of exposure expressed in dimensionless DREAM units. Both observers independently evaluated each crew member's job (N = 14 jobs) for road paving and mastic applications. Potential and actual dermal exposures were estimated for hands and for the rest of the body separately, taking into account the effect of protective clothing. To evaluate the reproducibility of the observational method intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were estimated. The exposures in DREAM units were modelled using linear mixed models to estimate average relative scores for each job. Correlations between dermal exposure parameters were evaluated by estimating Pearson correlation coefficients.
A total of 170 observations were completed by two observers independently (n = 118 and n = 52 for 59 road pavers and 26 mastic workers, respectively) in 11 days. The mean ICCs (for potential and actual exposure in DREAM units) varied between 0.74 and 0.80 with values for actual units being slightly higher. Geometric mean potential dermal exposure units of mastic workers were higher than for road pavers (factor 3 for hands and factor 4 for rest of the body). Differences for actual dermal exposure units were smaller for hands (factor 2) and larger for actual exposure units of rest of the body (factor 5). Differences in dermal exposure at the hands between jobs within a paving crew were much larger than between jobs within a mastic crew. Within paving crews, a consistent pattern for all exposure units emerged with 'screed man' and 'raker' as the two highest exposed jobs. Within mastic crews, 'driver dumper truck' and 'spreader of mastic' were scored as the two jobs with the highest exposure units. Potential and actual exposure units were highly correlated. Hands were more profoundly exposed than the rest of the body, with transfer from contaminated surface to the hands as the most important route.
DREAM observations were reproducible and showed a consistent dermal exposure pattern among the observed crews. The study provided a clear picture of dermal exposure among road pavers and indoor mastic workers, with the mastic workers being considerably more highly exposed. The most important route of exposure appeared to be transferred from contaminated surfaces to the hands.
PubMed ID
21597048 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between perceived present working conditions and demands versus attitude to early retirement among construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266541
Source
Work. 2014;48(2):217-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Einar Jebens
Jon I Medbø
Oddvar Knutsen
Asgeir Mamen
Kaj Bo Veiersted
Source
Work. 2014;48(2):217-28
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude
Construction Industry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Forecasting
Health status
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - etiology - psychology
Norway
Perception
Posture
Questionnaires
Retirement
Time Factors
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload - psychology
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Early retirement is an increasing problem in the construction industry. There is limited information about causes leading employees to leave working life early. We have compared construction workers present situation with their perception of future demands at work to avoid early retirement.
All 87 employees in a medium-sized Norwegian construction company participated in the study. All were men and answered questionnaires on health and pain, work ability, mechanical exposure, psychosocial conditions, and demands regarding future working conditions.
Most workers showed good work ability, irrespective of age. Many reported high levels of mechanical exposure at work. The level of musculoskeletal pain was higher in the middle-aged (30-50 year old) age groups and seniors aged over 50 years than among the youngest workers less than 30 years of age. All workers reported that good health was important for continued working. Most workers stated that future work must not be too physically demanding. Many workers reported relatively low job satisfaction; consequently an interesting job was rated as important for continuing work. Good social conditions were a high priority.
According to the examined construction workers, good health and reduced levels of mechanical exposure at work are essential to avoid early retirement.
PubMed ID
24858514 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between V?O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285221
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 21;17(1):272
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-21-2017
Author
Lene Lehmann Moberg
Lars-Kristian Lunde
Markus Koch
Anne Therese Tveter
Kaj Bo Veiersted
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 Mar 21;17(1):272
Date
Mar-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Construction Industry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Strength
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Occupations
Prevalence
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Construction and health care workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, and they are assumed to have physically demanding jobs. Profession- and gender-specific associations between individual capacity and musculoskeletal pain have not been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between individual capacity (maximal oxygen uptake (V?O2max) and handgrip strength) and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.
This cross-sectional study examined 137 construction and health care workers (58 women and 79 men) with a mean age of 41.8 years (standard deviation 12). Aerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the Åstrand cycle test, and strength was assessed by a handgrip test. Musculoskeletal pain was described by total pain, divided into neck, shoulder, and low back pain, during the last 12 months, and it was dichotomized in below or above 30 days. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between V?O2max, strength, and musculoskeletal pain in the total study sample and separately for construction and health care workers. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and selected mechanical and psychosocial factors.
Every second participant (51.8%) reported pain in either neck, shoulders or low back for more than 30 days during the last 12 months. Among the health care workers, a small but significant association was found between a high V?O2max, high handgrip strength, and a low level of musculoskeletal pain. No association was found for the construction workers.
An association between V?O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain was found for health care workers but not for construction workers. These results indicate that activities promoting individual capacity may reduce musculoskeletal pain for health care workers.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Apr;19(2):73-848316782
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Oct 18;14:108425326786
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2013 Sep 17;13:85524044699
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2010 Mar;53(3):285-32319753591
Cites: Ergonomics. 2009 Feb;52(2):232-4419296319
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2009 Apr;108(2):339-4219544938
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jun;33(6 Suppl):S379-99; discussion S419-2011427763
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Mar;26(3):291-825682984
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):357-6520352174
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Aug;85(6):615-2221986907
Cites: Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Sep;61(6):407-1521752940
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2012 Dec;54(12):1520-623114388
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Dec 10;9(12 ):e11505925494175
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Nov 12;15:111526563136
Cites: Workplace Health Saf. 2013 May;61(5):223-9; quiz 23023639038
Cites: Prog Cardiovasc Dis. 2015 Jan-Feb;57(4):387-9525446555
Cites: J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2014 Jun;43(1):1-826182667
Cites: Int J Occup Saf Ergon. 2013;19(4):667-7324321645
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand Suppl. 1960;49(169):1-9213794892
Cites: Eur Spine J. 2012 Jul;21(7):1265-7222134487
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2013 Feb 1;38(3):272-622814306
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 Oct 16;14:107525318646
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2012 Apr;69(4):250-522107796
Cites: Epidemiology. 2000 Sep;11(5):519-2210955403
Cites: J Appl Physiol. 1954 Sep;7(2):218-2113211501
Cites: Appl Ergon. 1987 Sep;18(3):233-715676628
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2001 Sep;41(3):312-711533560
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Aug 27;11:67121871113
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2007;22(6):379-8717356925
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2012 Apr;114(2):514-822755456
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2006 Aug;32(4):294-916932827
PubMed ID
28320356 View in PubMed
Less detail

Back and neck pain due to working in a cold environment: a cross-sectional study of male construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120448
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Oct;86(7):809-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Lage Burström
Bengt Järvholm
Tohr Nilsson
Jens Wahlström
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden, lage.burstrom@envmed.umu.se.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Oct;86(7):809-13
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Biomechanical Phenomena
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Construction Industry
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace
Abstract
To study whether work in a cold environment increased the risk of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and low back among construction workers.
This cross-sectional study is based on a cohort of male workers in the Swedish construction industry that participated in regular health examinations through a nationwide occupational health service. The analysis is based on workers examined from 1971 to 1974, who answered a questionnaire including questions about neck and back pain. The cohort consists of 134,754 male workers, including 16,496 office workers and foremen. The health examinations of the workers were conducted in provinces covering Sweden from the south to the north, and temperature data were collected for the provinces. In the analyses, the results were adjusted for age, BMI and use of nicotine.
The prevalence's of neck and low back pain were higher among manual construction workers than among foremen and office workers (24.3 vs. 8.6 % and 16.5 vs. 6.2 %, respectively); the corresponding adjusted ORs for low back and neck pain were 1.59 (95 % CI 1.52-1.66) and 1.39 (95 % CI 1.30-1.49), respectively. Workers in the northern and central provinces had higher ORs for low back and neck pain compared to workers in the southern province. The test for trends showed an increased risk of developing low back and neck pain with decreased outdoor temperature.
Outdoor work in a cold environment may increase the risk of low back and neck pain.
PubMed ID
23001633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bargaining for health: a case study of a collective agreement-based health program for manual workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274879
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Sep;37:123-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Morten Saaby Pedersen
Jacob Nielsen Arendt
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Sep;37:123-36
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Adult
Construction Industry
Denmark
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Abstract
This paper examines the short- and medium-term effects of the PensionDanmark Health Scheme, the largest privately administered health program for workers in Denmark, which provides prevention and early management of work-related injuries. We use a difference-in-differences approach that exploits a natural variation in the program rollout across collective agreement areas in the construction sector and over time. The results show only little evidence of an effect on the prevention of injuries requiring medical attention in the first 3 years after the program was introduced. Despite this, we find evidence of significant positive effects on several labor market outcomes, suggesting that the program enables some work-injured individuals to maintain their work and earnings capacity. In view of its low costs, the program appears to be cost-effective overall.
PubMed ID
24992391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biomarkers of endothelial activation and thrombosis in tunnel construction workers exposed to airborne contaminants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285393
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 May;90(4):309-317
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Dag G Ellingsen
Ingebjørg Seljeflot
Yngvar Thomassen
Magny Thomassen
Berit Bakke
Bente Ulvestad
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 May;90(4):309-317
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biomarkers - blood
CD40 Ligand - blood
Carbon - analysis
Construction Industry
Fatty Acids - blood
Humans
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
P-Selectin - blood
Particulate Matter - analysis
Platelet Activation
Quartz - analysis
Thrombosis
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - blood
Vehicle Emissions
Abstract
The aims were to study biomarkers of systemic inflammation, platelet/endothelial activation and thrombosis in tunnel construction workers (TCW).
Biomarkers and blood fatty acids were measured in blood of 90 TCW and 50 referents before (baseline) and towards the end (follow-up) of a 12 days work period. They had been absent from work for 9 days at baseline. Air samples were collected by personal sampling.
Personal thoracic air samples showed geometric mean (GM) particulate matter and a-quartz concentrations of 604 and 74 µg/m(3), respectively. The arithmetic mean (AM) concentration of elemental carbon was 51 µg/m(3). The GM (and 95% confidence interval) concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-a decreased from 2.2 (2.0-2.4) at baseline to 2.0 pg/mL (1.8-2.2) (p?=?0.02) at follow-up among the TCW. Also the platelet activation biomarkers P-selectin and CD40L decreased significantly [25.4 (24.1-26.6) to 24.4 (22.9-26.0)] ng/mL, p?=?0.04 and 125 (114-137) to 105 (96-115) pg/mL, p?
Notes
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Aug 15;176(4):395-40017446340
Cites: Biochim Biophys Acta. 2015 Apr;1851(4):469-8425149823
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Jul;114(7):992-816835049
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2007 Aug;64(8):515-917303673
Cites: J Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;17(5):169-7617827864
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Jul;115(7):1072-8017637925
Cites: AIHAJ. 2001 Jul-Aug;62(4):457-6511549139
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Oct;88(7):943-5125632885
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1999 Apr;13(4):810-310362045
Cites: J Lipid Res. 1982 Sep;23(7):1072-56897259
Cites: Mediators Inflamm. 2013;2013:61952324058272
Cites: Atheroscler Suppl. 2013 Aug;14(2):230-623958478
Cites: Part Fibre Toxicol. 2010 Jan 20;7:220205860
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Sep 13;357(11):1075-8217855668
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2014 Jul;235(1):150-6124835434
Cites: J Intern Med. 2012 Sep;272(3):224-3922724512
Cites: Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2005 Nov;289(5):C1229-3915972838
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006 Feb 15;173(4):432-4116293802
Cites: Biomarkers. 2010 Sep;15(6):498-50720528258
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Aug;115(8):1192-617687446
Cites: Biol Res Nurs. 2007 Oct;9(2):97-10717909162
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2012 Apr;221(2):536-4322317966
Cites: Front Pharmacol. 2015 Mar 23;6:5525852557
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2015 Feb;72(2):108-1325358744
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2010 Jun 3;411(11-12):785-9320188719
Cites: Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2006 May;290(5):L962-7016373671
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Oct;54(10):727-3321761428
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e4602823029372
Cites: Can J Biochem Physiol. 1959 Aug;37(8):911-713671378
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Jan;53(1):11-68563852
Cites: J Nutr Biochem. 2010 Sep;21(9):781-9220382009
Cites: Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2004 Jul;287(1):C55-6314973144
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jun 1;121(21):2331-7820458016
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2004 Jul;46(1):16-2215202121
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Dec;29(24):3043-5118952612
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2005 Sep 1;207(2 Suppl):483-815979665
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2014 Aug;58(7):818-2924902863
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2007 Jun;50(6):403-817450544
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2009 Apr;66(4):264-819017687
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Aug 15;176(4):370-617463411
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2015;27(8):363-7726194035
PubMed ID
28124139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Boat builders' occupational contact dermatitis - 11-year data from the Finnish register of occupational diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295403
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 May; 78(5):370-371
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2018
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Occupational Medicine, 00032 Työterveyslaitos, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2018 May; 78(5):370-371
Date
May-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Construction Industry
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Registries
Ships
PubMed ID
29383726 View in PubMed
Less detail

Communication of Ergonomics in building and construction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127180
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:4111-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Viveca Wiberg
Author Affiliation
Swedish Work Environment Authority.
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:4111-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control
Communication
Construction Industry
Human Engineering
Humans
Information Dissemination
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Injuries - prevention & control
Pamphlets
Sweden
Abstract
For the coming years SWEA is planning for communication and information actions. One of the sectors concerned is the building and construction industry. Focus of the information is to avoid accidents and injuries, and how companies by themselves can prevent risks. The objective of the information is to increase awareness among all stakeholders in order to secure that they are willing and able to reduce risks for workers. At the conference two brochures will be presented. They are designed to provide information and knowledge about specific risks of occupational accidents and occupational diseases which occur frequently during construction work and how they can be prevented. They are directed to all those who are involved in the construction process at different stages and who are subject to SWEAs rules and regulations. New identified risk groups are e.g. students, apprentices, self-employed, and foreign workers temporarily working in Sweden. We also see that work is still being carried out in narrow installation spaces during erection stage of buildings because the people responsible for the drawings do not take notice of the need for sufficient space to do the work. SWEA experienced that it is difficult to reach all the groups concerned with the message about how to avoid injuries and unnecessary musculoskeletal disorders.
PubMed ID
22317351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cumulative years in occupation and the risk of hip or knee osteoarthritis in men and women: a register-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128031
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 May;69(5):325-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Susan Andersen
Lau Caspar Thygesen
Michael Davidsen
Karin Helweg-Larsen
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. sua@niph.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2012 May;69(5):325-30
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology
Construction Industry - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - epidemiology - etiology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Sex Factors
Workload
Abstract
Occupational workload has been associated with an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA), but only little research has been conducted among female workers. The objective of this study was to analyse if men and women in farming, construction or healthcare work have increased risk of developing OA of the hip or knee.
A follow-up study based on register data of the whole Danish working population in the period 1981 to 2006 followed up for hip or knee OA during 1996 to 2006. Cumulative years in occupation were calculated for assessment of dose-response relationship. Gender-specific analyses were carried out with Cox regression models using age as timescale and adjusting for calendar period, income, unemployment and previous knee injury, and done separately for hip and knee OA.
Male floor layers and bricklayers and male and female healthcare assistants had the highest risks of knee OA, and farmers had the highest risk of hip OA. Male farmers had increased risk of hip OA already after 1-5 years in occupation (HR, 1.63) and a dose-response-related risk of hip OA (HR up to 4.22). Generally, the risk of OA increased with cumulative years in the occupation in both men and women.
Occupations with heavy physical workload present a strong risk for hip and knee OA in both men and women, and the risks increase with cumulative years in occupation and noticeable hip OA among male farmers.
PubMed ID
22241844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Digging into construction: social networks and their potential impact on knowledge transfer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123436
Source
Work. 2012;42(2):223-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
N A Carlan
D M Kramer
P. Bigelow
R. Wells
E. Garritano
P. Vi
Author Affiliation
Centre of Research Expertise for the Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders, Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada. ncarlan@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Work. 2012;42(2):223-32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Canada
Construction Industry - manpower
Decision Making, Organizational
Efficiency, Organizational
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Information Systems - organization & administration
Interinstitutional Relations
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Labor Unions - organization & administration
Musculoskeletal Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Safety Management - methods - standards
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Social Networking
Workload - standards
Abstract
A six-year study is exploring the most effective ways to disseminate ideas to reduce musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the construction sector. The sector was targeted because MSDs account for 35% of all lost time injuries. This paper reports on the organization of the construction sector, and maps potential pathways of communication, including social networks, to set the stage for future dissemination.
The managers, health and safety specialists, union health and safety representatives, and 28 workers from small, medium and large construction companies participated.
Over a three-year period, data were collected from 47 qualitative interviews. Questions were guided by the PARIHS (Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services) knowledge-transfer conceptual framework and adapted for the construction sector.
The construction sector is a complex and dynamic sector, with non-linear reporting relationships, and divided and diluted responsibilities. Four networks were identified that can potentially facilitate the dissemination of new knowledge: worksite-project networks; union networks; apprenticeship program networks; and networks established by the Construction Safety Association/Infrastructure Health and Safety Association.
Flexible and multi-directional lines of communication must be used in this complex environment. This has implications for the future choice of knowledge transfer strategies.
PubMed ID
22699189 View in PubMed
Less detail

44 records – page 1 of 5.