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Accountability in public health units: using a modified nominal group technique to develop a balanced scorecard for performance measurement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183128
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Sep-Oct;94(5):391-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Victoria A Robinson
Duncan Hunter
Samuel E D Shortt
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. Robinson@hip.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Sep-Oct;94(5):391-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking - methods - standards
Consensus
Decision Making
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Planning Techniques
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health Administration - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Little attention has been paid to the need for accountability instruments applicable across all health units in the public health system. One tool, the balanced scorecard was created for industry and has been successfully adapted for use in Ontario hospitals. It consists of 4 quadrants: financial performance, outcomes, customer satisfaction and organizational development. The aim of the present study was to determine if a modified nominal group technique could be used to reach consensus among public health unit staff and public health specialists in Ontario about the components of a balanced scorecard for public health units.
A modified nominal group technique consensus method was used with the public health unit staff in 6 Eastern Ontario health units (n=65) and public health specialists (n=18).
73.8% of the public health unit personnel from all six health units in the eastern Ontario region participated in the survey of potential indicators. A total of 74 indicators were identified in each of the 4 quadrants: program performance (n=44); financial performance (n=11); public perceptions (n=11); and organizational performance (n=8).
The modified nominal group technique was a successful method of incorporating the views of public health personnel and specialists in the development of a balanced scorecard for public health.
PubMed ID
14577752 View in PubMed
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Accuracy, consensus, in-group bias, and cultural frame shifting in the context of national character stereotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104583
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jan-Erik Lönnqvist
Kenn Konstabel
Nellystiina Lönnqvist
Markku Verkasalo
Source
J Soc Psychol. 2014 Jan-Feb;154(1):40-58
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Character
Consensus
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Culture
Ethnic Groups
Female
Finland
Group Processes
Humans
Male
Multilingualism
Prejudice - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Stereotyping
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
We examined Finns' and bilingual Swedish-Finns' stereotypes regarding personality differences between Finns and Swedish-Finns and compared them with their respective self-ratings. Stereotype ratings by both groups converged on depicting Swedish-Finns as having a more desirable personality. In-group bias also influenced stereotypes. Contrary to predictions based on the Stereotype Content Model, out-group stereotypes were not compensatory. Consistent with the kernel of truth hypothesis of national stereotypes, Swedish-Finns' aggregate self-ratings resembled their stereotype of personality differences between the two groups, and their personality self-ratings were more desirable than Finns' self-ratings. Tentatively suggesting the occurrence of cultural frame shifting, the resemblance between Swedish-Finns' self-ratings and their stereotype of Swedish-Finns was, although only marginally statistically significantly, somewhat stronger when the self-ratings were provided in Swedish.
PubMed ID
24689336 View in PubMed
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[A consensus conference in forensic psychiatry is needed to coordinate survey and care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225664
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1991
Author
M. Elton
Author Affiliation
Rättspsykiatriska regionvårdsenheten, Birgittas sjukhus, Vadstena.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Sep 25;88(39):3200-1
Date
Sep-25-1991
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Forensic Psychiatry - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
1921615 View in PubMed
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[A consensus statement on estrogen replacement after menopause].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210352
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 11;93(50):4657-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-1996
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 11;93(50):4657-61
Date
Dec-11-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Menopause
Middle Aged
Sweden
PubMed ID
8999264 View in PubMed
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Addressing implementation challenges during guideline development - a case study of Swedish national guidelines for methods of preventing disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277834
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015 Jan 22;15:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2015
Author
Linda Richter-Sundberg
Therese Kardakis
Lars Weinehall
Rickard Garvare
Monica E Nyström
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015 Jan 22;15:19
Date
Jan-22-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Consensus
Evidence-Based Practice - organization & administration - standards
Health promotion - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Quality of Health Care
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
Many of the world's life threatening diseases (e.g. cancer, heart disease, stroke) could be prevented by eliminating life-style habits such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol use. Incorporating evidence-based research on methods to change unhealthy lifestyle habits in clinical practice would be equally valuable. However gaps between guideline development and implementation are well documented, with implications for health care quality, safety and effectiveness. The development phase of guidelines has been shown to be important both for the quality in guideline content and for the success of implementation. There are, however, indications that guidelines related to general disease prevention methods encounter specific barriers compared to guidelines that are diagnosis-specific. In 2011 the Swedish National board for Health and Welfare launched guidelines with a preventive scope. The aim of this study was to investigate how implementation challenges were addressed during the development process of these disease preventive guidelines.
Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of the guideline development management group. Archival data detailing the guideline development process were also collected and used in the analysis. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis as the analytical framework.
The study identified several strategies and approaches that were used to address implementation challenges during guideline development. Four themes emerged from the analysis: broad agreements and consensus about scope and purpose; a formalized and structured development procedure; systematic and active involvement of stakeholders; and openness and transparency in the specific guideline development procedure. Additional factors concerning the scope of prevention and the work environment of guideline developers were perceived to influence the possibilities to address implementation issues.
This case study provides examples of how guideline developers perceive and approach the issue of implementation during the development and early launch of prevention guidelines. Models for guideline development could benefit from an initial assessment of how the guideline topic, its target context and stakeholders will affect the upcoming implementation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25608684 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in community care: developing a research agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162493
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):63-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Paul Masotti
Michael Green
Sam Shortt
Duncan Hunter
Karen Szala-Meneok
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queen's University. masottip@post.queensu.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):63-9
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Consensus
Education
Emergency medical services
Home Care Services
Humans
Medical Errors
Ontario
Quality of Health Care
Research
Abstract
Little is known about the extent to which adverse events compromise the quality of community care. This article describes the results of a consensus workshop in which 31 healthcare professionals were asked to identify and rank common adverse events and important research questions relating to community care. Workshop participants were decision-makers and healthcare providers with areas of expertise that included community and home care; acute and primary care; patient safety; medical errors; and health services policy, administration and research. Results include prioritized lists of adverse events, research questions and contributing factors associated with adverse events. Further study should be aimed at defining and implementing research priorities and developing standardized definitions of common adverse events associated with community care.
PubMed ID
17626548 View in PubMed
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[Agreement between clinical practice guidelines for management of community-acquired pneumonia. A retrospective study of 101 hospitalized patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181855
Source
Rev Mal Respir. 2003 Dec;20(6 Pt 1):858-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
J. Labarère
M. Fourny
P. Pavese
P. Bedouch
C. Brambilla
P. François
Author Affiliation
Unité d'Evaluation Médicale, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble, France. jlabarere@chu-grenoble.fr
Source
Rev Mal Respir. 2003 Dec;20(6 Pt 1):858-70
Date
Dec-2003
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Community-Acquired Infections - drug therapy
Consensus
Europe
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - drug therapy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Retrospective Studies
United States
Abstract
Management guidelines for acute community acquired pneumonia vary considerably. The objective is to estimate by a retrospective study the uniformity of the recommendations for the management of patients and the choice of initial empirical antibiotic therapy.
Eight English and French language guidelines published between 1998 and 2001 were identified by a search of the literature. They were applied retrospectively to a sample of 101 patients admitted to a university hospital in 2000 with a diagnosis of pneumonia.
Hospital admission was advocated for between 61% and 95% and admission to intensive care for between 8% and 35% of the patients, depending on the guidelines under consideration. The actual management conformed to that advocated for between 34% and 94% of the patients (kappa=0.27 [0,19; 0,34]). Compliance of the empirical antibiotic therapy (drug, dose, mode of administration) with the recommendations varied from 0% to 68% of the patients depending on the guidelines considered (kappa=0.01 [-0,10; 0,12]).
The heterogeneity of the guidelines is manifest by important variations in the recommendations for management and initial empirical therapy. These differences are due, in part, to a paucity of evidence based data upon which to base the guidelines. It would appear essential to harmonise the guidelines in a way that is appropriate for the country of their intended use.
Notes
Comment In: Rev Mal Respir. 2003 Dec;20(6 Pt 1):841-314743083
PubMed ID
14743087 View in PubMed
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Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines for newborns at a Copenhagen University Hospital - a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79323
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jan;96(1):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Brok Jesper
Greisen Gorm
Jacobsen Thorkild
Gluud Lise L
Gluud Christian
Author Affiliation
The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group, Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, H:S Rigshospitalet, Denmark. jbrok@ctu.rh.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jan;96(1):39-43
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Denmark
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Audit
Neonatology - standards
Practice Guidelines - standards
Abstract
AIM: To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development. METHODS: The recommendations in the reviews and guidelines were compared and classified as being in 'agreement', 'partial agreement' or 'disagreement'. The guideline authors were interviewed for reasons about disagreement and whether Cochrane reviews were considered during the guideline development. RESULTS: Agreement between reviews and guidelines was found for 133 interventions (77%), partial agreement for 31 interventions (18%) and disagreement for nine interventions (5%). Six interventions were recommended in the guidelines, but not in the reviews. Three interventions were recommended in the reviews, but not in the guidelines. Use of consensus statements, evidence on surrogate markers, observational studies, basic immunology and pathophysiological knowledge, expert opinion, economical constraints, reservations about the external validity and unawareness of reviews were reasons for disagreement. Cochrane reviews were rarely (22%) used during the guideline development. CONCLUSION: We found agreement between more than three quarters of Cochrane reviews and neonatal guidelines. However, few important disagreements occurred. Reviews were only used for guideline development in about a fifth of cases.
PubMed ID
17187601 View in PubMed
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Agreement on disease-specific criteria for do-not-resuscitate orders in acute stroke. Members of the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortiums.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212814
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
A V Alexandrov
P M Pullicino
E M Meslin
J W Norris
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Buffalo General Hospital, State University of New York, USA.
Source
Stroke. 1996 Feb;27(2):232-7
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Brain Damage, Chronic
Brain diseases
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - nursing - physiopathology
Consensus
Ethics, Medical
Ethics, Nursing
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
New York
Patient care team
Patient Selection
Physicians
Professional-Family Relations
Prognosis
Resuscitation Orders
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
The do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order is a mechanism of withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The lack of DNR guidelines specific for acute stroke may result in many stroke patients receiving unnecessary and futile resuscitation and ventilator-assisted breathing.
A prospective multicenter evaluation of disease-specific criteria for DNR orders in acute stroke was initiated using a modified Delphi process. The participants were the Canadian and Western New York Stroke Consortium members who are closely involved in caring for acute stroke patients and conducting clinical trials at the academic centers. Previously published provisional criteria were reviewed by the participants. Modifications were made to the criteria until statistically significant agreement (P
PubMed ID
8571415 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and pregnancy consensus clinical guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138492
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Aug;32(8 Suppl 3):S1-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
George Carson
Lori Vitale Cox
Joan Crane
Pascal Croteau
Lisa Graves
Sandra Kluka
Gideon Koren
Marie-Jocelyne Martel
Deana Midmer
Irena Nulman
Nancy Poole
Vyta Senikas
Rebecca Wood
Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Aug;32(8 Suppl 3):S1-31
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis
Alcoholism - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Consensus
Counseling
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - etiology - prevention & control
Fetal Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Preconception Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - therapy
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Temperance
Abstract
to establish national standards of care for the screening and recording of alcohol use and counselling on alcohol use of women of child-bearing age and pregnant women based on the most up-to-date evidence.
published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library in May 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., pregnancy complications, alcohol drinking, prenatal care) and key words (e.g., pregnancy, alcohol consumption, risk reduction). Results were restricted to literature published in the last five years with the following research designs: systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2010. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment (HTA) and HTA-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, clinical practice guideline collections, and clinical trial registries. Each article was screened for relevance and the full text acquired if determined to be relevant. The evidence obtained was reviewed and evaluated by the members of the Expert Workgroup established by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were made according to guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
the quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1).
the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
these consensus guidelines have been endorsed by the Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Quebec; the Canadian Association of Midwives; the Canadian Association of Perinatal, Women's Health and Neonatal Nurses (CAPWHN); the College of Family Physicians of Canada; the Federation of Medical Women of Canada; the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada; and Motherisk. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. There is evidence that alcohol consumption in pregnancy can cause fetal harm. (II-2) There is insufficient evidence regarding fetal safety or harm at low levels of alcohol consumption in pregnancy. (III) 2. There is insufficient evidence to define any threshold for low-level drinking in pregnancy. (III) 3. Abstinence is the prudent choice for a woman who is or might become pregnant. (III) 4. Intensive culture-, gender-, and family-appropriate interventions need to be available and accessible for women with problematic drinking and/or alcohol dependence. (II-2).
1. Universal screening for alcohol consumption should be done periodically for all pregnant women and women of child-bearing age. Ideally, at-risk drinking could be identified before pregnancy, allowing for change. (II-2B) 2. Health care providers should create a safe environment for women to report alcohol consumption. (III-A) 3. The public should be informed that alcohol screening and support for women at risk is part of routine women's health care. (III-A) 4. Health care providers should be aware of the risk factors associated with alcohol use in women of reproductive age. (III-B) 5. Brief interventions are effective and should be provided by health care providers for women with at-risk drinking. (II-2B) 6. If a woman continues to use alcohol during pregnancy, harm reduction/treatment strategies should be encouraged. (II-2B) 7. Pregnant women should be given priority access to withdrawal management and treatment. (III-A) 8. Health care providers should advise women that low-level consumption of alcohol in early pregnancy is not an indication for termination of pregnancy. (II-2A).
PubMed ID
21172102 View in PubMed
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276 records – page 1 of 28.