Skip header and navigation

Refine By

243 records – page 1 of 25.

Advanced Paternal Age and Risk of Musculoskeletal Congenital Anomalies in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277020
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;104(6):273-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Stine Kjaer Urhoj
Laust Hvas Mortensen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Source
Birth Defects Res B Dev Reprod Toxicol. 2015 Dec;104(6):273-80
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Paternal Age
Risk factors
Abstract
Previous research suggests that advanced paternal age increases the risk of musculoskeletal congenital anomalies (CAs) in offspring, but findings are inconsistent. This study aims to investigate the risk of musculoskeletal CAs according to paternal age at birth in an unselected population covering cohort of children.
A register-based prospective study of 1,605,885 children born in Denmark, 1978-2004, using information from record-linked health and administrative registers. The association between paternal age and overall musculoskeletal CAs, limb anomalies, craniosynostosis, skeletal dysplasias, syndromic musculoskeletal CAs, and other musculoskeletal CAs were investigated by multiple logistic regression analysis.
For overall musculoskeletal CAs, a slightly higher risk per 10-year increase in paternal age was found (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06 [95% CI: 1.01-1.11; where CI is confidence interval]). A 26% (95% CI: 2-56%) excess risk was found for fathers aged 50+ years compared to fathers aged 30-34 years. For syndromic musculoskeletal CAs, excess risks were found for fathers aged 40+ years, compared to fathers aged 30-34 years (40-44: OR = 1.38 [95% CI: 1.01-1.88], 45-49: OR = 1.45 [95% CI: 0.89-2.34], 50+: OR = 1.42 [95% CI: 0.73-2.79]). The risks in all other subgroups of musculoskeletal CAs were increased for fathers aged 50+ years.
A slightly higher risk for overall musculoskeletal CAs in offspring was found with increasing paternal age, mainly due to an excess risk of syndromic musculoskeletal CAs for fathers aged 40+ years. While associations between paternal age 50+ years and increased risk of all subtypes of musculoskeletal CAs were indicated, advanced paternal age likely plays a minor role in the etiology of these anomalies.
PubMed ID
26663788 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229677
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 1;141(11):1155-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1989
Author
R B Lowry
N Y Thunem
S. Anderson-Redick
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 1;141(11):1155-9
Date
Dec-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Registries
Vital statistics
Abstract
The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1977 Mar;6(1):35-41892967
Cites: Teratology. 1977 Dec;16(3):277-83594911
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1978 Oct;42(4):641-7696646
Cites: Teratology. 1968 Aug;1(3):263-805759547
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1981 Sep;10(3):247-527287285
Cites: Teratology. 1981 Dec;24(3):277-837330776
Cites: Lancet. 1982 Oct 23;2(8304):9376126782
Cites: Med J Aust. 1983 Aug 20;2(4):189-916877168
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1984 Dec;38(4):296-3056512482
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1985 Nov;22(3):545-523840650
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Jan 15;136(2):109-112947673
Cites: Genet Epidemiol. 1986;3(6):455-673803914
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1987 Nov;(224):37-443665254
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 May 1;138(9):819-233282629
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 May 15;140(10):1167-702713802
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 May 15;142(10):1038-92337839
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1990 Feb 1;142(3):211
PubMed ID
2819634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amniotic fluid chemokines and autism spectrum disorders: an exploratory study utilizing a Danish Historic Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131145
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2012 Jan;26(1):170-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Morsi W Abdallah
Nanna Larsen
Jakob Grove
Bent Nørgaard-Pedersen
Poul Thorsen
Erik L Mortensen
David M Hougaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Aarhus University School of Public Health, Aarhus, Denmark. mab@soci.au.dk
Source
Brain Behav Immun. 2012 Jan;26(1):170-6
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Amniotic Fluid - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Chemokine CCL2 - analysis - metabolism
Chemokine CCL3 - analysis - metabolism
Chemokine CCL5 - metabolism
Chemokines - metabolism
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - epidemiology - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Maternal Age
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Abstract
Elevated levels of chemokines have been reported in plasma and brain tissue of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to examine chemokine levels in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of individuals diagnosed with ASD and their controls.
A Danish Historic Birth Cohort (HBC) kept at Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen was utilized. Using data from Danish nation-wide health registers, a case-control study design of 414 cases and 820 controls was adopted. Levels of MCP-1, MIP-1a and RANTES were analyzed using Luminex xMAP technology. Case-control differences were assessed as dichotomized at below the 10th percentile or above the 90th percentile cut-off points derived from the control biomarker distributions (logistic regression) or continuous measures (tobit regression).
AF volume for 331 cases and 698 controls was sufficient for Luminex analysis. Including all individuals in the cohort yielded no significant differences in chemokine levels in cases versus controls. Logistic regression analyses, performed on individuals diagnosed using ICD-10 only, showed increased risk for ASD with elevated MCP-1 (elevated 90th percentile adjusted OR: 2.32 [95% CI: 1.17-4.61]) compared to controls. An increased risk for infantile autism with elevated MCP-1 was also found (adjusted OR: 2.28 [95% CI: 1.16-4.48]). Elevated levels of MCP-1 may decipher an etiologic immunologic dysfunction or play rather an indirect role in the pathophysiology of ASD. Further studies to confirm its role and to identify the potential pathways through which MCP-1 may contribute to the development of ASD are necessary.
Notes
Comment In: Brain Behav Immun. 2012 Mar;26(3):39322001185
PubMed ID
21933705 View in PubMed
Less detail

An increased incidence of total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage among aboriginal Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213587
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1996 Jan;12(1):81-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
B W McCrindle
M M Wood
G F Collins
B. Wheatley
R D Rowe
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 1996 Jan;12(1):81-5
Date
Jan-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant, Newborn
Manitoba - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Pulmonary Veins - abnormalities
Registries
Risk
Abstract
To determine whether Aboriginal Canadians from Manitoba and Ontario have an increased incidence of isolated total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD) and to compare results obtained from two different data sources and time periods.
A nonconcurrent cohort study was undertaken. Incidence rates and relative risk from 'traditional' data sources (cases from medical records data; births from Census, Vital Statistics and Native Registry data for Manitoba and Ontario) from 1972-84 were derived and compared with those from computerized hospital abstract data from Manitoba for 1987-91.
Using traditional data sources an incidence of 0.282/1000 live births was noted in Aboriginals versus 0.062 in non-Aboriginals for a relative risk of 4.6 (95% CI = 2.7-7.7). For Manitoba only the relative risk was 5.8 (95% CI = 2.6-12.8). Using computerized administrative data from Manitoba the relative risk was 5.8 (95% CI = 1.3-25.8).
There is an increased incidence of isolated TAPVD in Aboriginal peoples from Manitoba and Ontario. Further epidemiological investigation is necessary to determine the nature of this association.
PubMed ID
8595573 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annual trends in use of periconceptional folic acid and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108772
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Audrey-Ann Richard-Tremblay
Odile Sheehy
Anick Bérard
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - physiopathology
Databases, Factual
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities - epidemiology
Nervous System Malformations - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that periconceptional folic acid use could not only prevent neural tube defects but also other malformations. The objectives of this study were to assess trends in dispensed high dose periconceptional folic acid (5 mg) and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.
The Quebec Pregnancy Registry, an administrative database with information on periconceptional prescribed medication and diagnostic codes was used to conduct this study. All pregnant women insured by the Quebec public drug plan between January 1(st) 1998 and December 31(st) 2008 were included. The exposure was defined as the use of high dose periconceptional folic acid 30 days before, and during the first 70 days of pregnancy. The outcome measured was the birth prevalence of major congenital malformations among live births.
We identified 152,392 pregnancies and babies. The annual prevalence of high dose periconceptional folic acid use increased from 0.17% to 0.80% (p
PubMed ID
23845112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antenatal screening for congenital nephrosis in Finland by maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242012
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1983 May;90(5):437-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
M. Ryynänen
M. Seppälä
P. Kuusela
J. Rapola
P. Aula
A. Seppä
V. Jokela
O. Castren
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1983 May;90(5):437-42
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amniocentesis
Amniotic Fluid - analysis
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Mass Screening
Nephrosis - congenital - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
alpha-Fetoproteins - analysis
Abstract
In the Kuopio and North-Karelia districts of Finland 10724 pregnancies were screened for congenital nephrosis by maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) measurement. Outcome was known for 10504 (98%) pregnancies, of which 509 (4 X 8%) had a serum AFP level greater than or equal to 2 X 5 multiples of the normal median (MoM) at 15-18 weeks gestation. After exclusion of those women who had a normal serum AFP level (less than 2 X 5 MoM) in a second sample, 'wrong dates' or multiple pregnancy, 267 (2 X 5%) remained with a high serum AFP level. Amniocentesis was carried out in 225 (2 X 1%) and 16 women had an amniotic fluid AFP level greater than 10 SD above the normal mean. In this group there were six fetuses with congenital nephrosis (four confirmed and two suspected), six other serious malformations (including an intrauterine death) and four without obvious abnormality. In the 98% pregnancies followed up there were no infants with congenital nephrosis that had been missed. Babies with congenital nephrosis require permanent hospitalization and have a mean survival of 8 months. In Finland, within certain areas, the birth prevalence is as high as 1 in 2600 per year. In such areas maternal serum AFP measurement appears to be a useful method of screening for congenital nephrosis. The service was also well accepted since 94% of the women with raised serum AFP levels wished to be screened again in a future pregnancy.
PubMed ID
6189511 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anticonvulsants and parental epilepsy in the development of birth defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251352
Source
Lancet. 1976 Feb 7;1(7954):272-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1976
Author
S. Shapiro
S C Hartz
V. Siskind
A A Mitchell
D. Slone
L. Rosenberg
R R Monson
O P Heinonen
Source
Lancet. 1976 Feb 7;1(7954):272-5
Date
Feb-7-1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Epilepsy - complications - drug therapy
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intelligence Tests
Male
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Phenobarbital - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Phenytoin - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
United States
Abstract
The results of two studies, one in Finland and one in the U.S.A., raise the possibility that fetal damage previously attributed to phenytoin and other anticonvulsant drugs, principally phenobarbitone, may be due to epilepsy itself. In the U.S.A., drug-exposure information was collected before delivery in a cohort of 50 282 mother/child pairs. The total malformation rate in 305 children born to epileptic mothers was 10.5%, as against 6.4% in the remainder (p less than 0.01); corresponding rates for major malformations were 6.6% and 2.7%. When the fathers had epilepsy, the malformation-rates in their children were intermediate. The rates did not vary significantly according to maternal anticonvulsants therapy. Mental and motor scores as 8 months of age, and intelligence quotient scores at 4 years were lower in children of epileptic mothers, but not in children of epileptic fathers. The scores showed only random variation according to maternal anticonvulsant therapy. In Finland, 2784 children with craniofacial anomalies were compared with an equal number of normal children; 8 and 2 mothers, respectively, received anticonvulsants, while pregnant, for epilepsy. In that study, the separate effects of the disease and its treatmet could not be evaluated. Both studies did not find evidence of fetal damage when phenobarbitone was taken for indications other than epilepsy.
PubMed ID
55587 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists teratogenic in humans?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135113
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jun;31(3):356-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Birgitta Norstedt Wikner
Bengt Källén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Solna, Clinical Pharmacology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. birgitta.norstedt-wikner@karolinska.se
Source
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jun;31(3):356-9
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology
Acetamides - adverse effects
Adult
Azabicyclo Compounds - adverse effects
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
GABA-A Receptor Agonists - adverse effects
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - adverse effects
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Parturition - drug effects
Piperazines - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pyridines - adverse effects
Pyrimidines - adverse effects
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
Hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists (HBRAs; zolpidem, zopiclone, and zaleplon) are used in the treatment of insomnia. Little is known about the safety of HBRAs during pregnancy.
Data from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry from July 1, 1995, up to 2007 were used to identify 1318 women who reported the use of HBRAs in early pregnancy. They gave birth to 1341 infants. Maternal characteristics and the presence of congenital malformations were compared with all other women who gave birth (n = 1,106,001) and all other infants (n = 1,125,734) born during the study period.
Use and/or reporting of HBRAs increased with maternal age and were higher at first than higher parity. Maternal smoking was strongly associated with reported use of HBRAs. The probability of using HBRAs increased in women who had had 3 or more earlier miscarriages or 5 or more years of involuntary childlessness. An excess use of other drugs and above all psychoactive drugs were seen in women reporting use of HBRAs.Hypnotic benzodiazepine receptor agonists were not associated with an increased risk for congenital malformations. A statistically significant high risk for other intestinal malformations than atresias/stenosis was based on only 4 infants.
Maternal use of HBRAs does not seem to increase malformation risk. The tentative association with some intestinal malformations may be due to chance because of multiple testing and needs confirmation.
PubMed ID
21508851 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are prenatal, obstetric, and infant complications associated with postpartum psychosis among women with pre-conception psychiatric hospitalisations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118550
Source
BJOG. 2013 Mar;120(4):446-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
W L Hellerstedt
S M Phelan
S. Cnattingius
C M Hultman
B L Harlow
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA. helle023@umn.edu
Source
BJOG. 2013 Mar;120(4):446-55
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bipolar Disorder - complications - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Preconception Care - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the associations of maternal and infant complications with postpartum hospitalisation for psychosis in women with a pre-conception history of psychiatric hospitalisation.
Population-based study.
Swedish medical birth register.
Primiparous women who gave birth between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 2001, and who had a pre-conception history of psychiatric hospitalisation but who were not hospitalised during pregnancy (n = 1842).
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes were used to identify prenatal, obstetric, postpartum maternal complications, and newborn health conditions. We used multivariable logistic regression to describe the associations between maternal and infant health conditions and the odds for postpartum hospitalisation for psychosis.
Psychiatric hospitalisation within 90 days of delivery.
Compared with women who did not have a postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation, hospitalised women were at 2.3 times higher odds (95% CI 1.0-4.9) of having non-psychiatric puerperium complications (e.g. infection, lactation problems or venous complications). No other maternal complications were associated with postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation. Although their infants were at no higher odds for health complications, the offspring of women who had a postpartum psychiatric hospitalisation were at 4.1 times higher odds (95% CI 1.3-12.6) of death within the first 365 days of life than those of women who were not hospitalised.
We found no prenatal indicators of postpartum risk for psychiatric hospitalisation among high-risk women, but they had higher odds of postpartum pregnancy-related medical problems and, rarely, offspring death.
Notes
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jan;64(1):42-817199053
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2006 May;15(4):352-6816724884
Cites: PLoS Med. 2009 Feb 10;6(2):e1319209952
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;166(4):405-819339365
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2009;24(11):659-6719504049
Cites: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2010 Feb;13(1):45-720127455
Cites: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2011 Apr;14(2):89-9821128087
Cites: Bipolar Disord. 2003 Apr;5(2):98-10512680898
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jan 24;363(9405):303-1014751705
Cites: Psychol Med. 1981 May;11(2):341-507267875
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Jun;157(6):924-3010831472
Cites: Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2000 Feb;14(1):73-8710789261
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1987 May;150:662-733651704
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Jan 15;153(2):110-311159154
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jun;158(6):913-711384899
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2001 Jul;58(7):674-911448375
Cites: Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):E3511483845
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2001 Nov;104(5):323-3111722312
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Jul;159(7):1080-9212091183
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 Nov;37(11):527-3112395142
Cites: Schizophr Res. 2002 Dec 1;58(2-3):221-912409162
Cites: J Affect Disord. 1993 May;28(1):39-508326079
Cites: J Affect Disord. 1994 Feb;30(2):77-878201128
Cites: J Affect Disord. 1995 Jan 11;33(1):11-227714304
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Mar;91(3):167-737625190
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1997 Aug;45(2):164-69267376
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1999 Jul;100(1):40-610442438
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2004 Dec;83(2-3):215-2015555716
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;162(6):1045-5615930050
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2005 Jul;112(1):47-5315952945
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2005;59(6):457-6416316898
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2006 Jan;188:32-616388067
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2008 Jan;117(1):12-917941968
PubMed ID
23194279 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of environmental health risks is feasible by secondary use of administrative registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115387
Source
Inform Health Soc Care. 2013 Sep;38(3):291-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Mika Gissler
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. mika.gissler@thl.fi
Source
Inform Health Soc Care. 2013 Sep;38(3):291-301
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Fertility
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
National register systems include detailed individual-level information. In the Nordic countries, these data sources include personal identification number, which can be used for linkages between registers. A case study on the effects of possible hazardous waste on the former and current residents of Myllypuro in Helsinki, Finland, is presented to assess if the utilisation of pre-collected official health register information is feasible in environmental health research. National register information was used as the primary data source, since large-scale health examination studies are seldom feasible and the use of surveys may result in biased information. The exposure data were based on residence information from the Central Population Register and the outcome data came from three national population and health registers. No evidence of health problems was found. The use of administrative register data was feasible, since the main prerequisites of epidemiological studies - the enumeration of exposed population without selection bias, the tracking of exposed population without loss to follow-up and the formation of different exposure measures - were reached. The small size of study sample and the rarity of several outcome measures impeded the analysis and the evaluation of clinical and public health aspects of the main findings.
PubMed ID
23514042 View in PubMed
Less detail

243 records – page 1 of 25.