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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Anomalies at the thoracic outlet are frequent in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214787
Source
Am J Surg. 1995 Jul;170(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
T. Juvonen
J. Satta
P. Laitala
K. Luukkonen
J. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Surg. 1995 Jul;170(1):33-7
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brachial Plexus - abnormalities
Cadaver
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Subclavian Artery - abnormalities
Thoracic Outlet Syndrome - epidemiology
Thorax - abnormalities
Abstract
Abnormal anatomy at the thoracic outlet is frequent in patients operated on for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). The present study was designed to find out the rate of thoracic outlet anomalies in the general population.
Fifty cadavers representing a general population were subjected to a total of 98 meticulously performed cervical dissections to ascertain the frequency of congenital anomalies in the thoracocervicoaxillary region.
During the 98 cervical dissections, 62 instances of abnormal anatomy of the thoracic outlet were found, and fully normal anatomy was found in 36 cases. Of the total 69 abnormalies, 66 could be classified according to Roos: 37 were type 3 abnormalities, 15 were type 5, 9 were type 11, and there was 1 each of type 4, type 6, type 7, type 9, and type 10 abnormalities. The remaining 3 abnormalities did not fit into Roos' classification. Only 10% (5/50) of the cadavers had a bilaterally normal anatomy.
The results demonstrate that abnormal structures, such as congenital bands in the thoracic outlet, are more common in the general population than had previously been described. We suggest that fibrous bands confer a predisposition for TOS following a certain degree of stress or injury.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Surg. 1995 Nov;170(5):5247485748
PubMed ID
7793491 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in children with birth defects and in their families: a population based cohort study of 5.2 million children from Norway and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93570
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Mar;17(3):500-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Bjørge Tone
Cnattingius Sven
Lie Rolv Terje
Tretli Steinar
Engeland Anders
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, N-5018 Bergen, Norway. tone.bjorge@isf.uib.no
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 Mar;17(3):500-6
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Family Health
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Registries
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cancer and birth defects may share factors that influence risk. A malformation may involve physiologic changes or changes in lifestyle that might affect cancer risks. METHODS: In Norway and Sweden, the population-based medical birth and cancer registries were linked to identify subsequent cancer occurrence in children with birth defects and among their parents and siblings. Altogether, 5.2 million children and their families were included. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) served as a measure of relative risk. RESULTS: There was an increased overall cancer risk in individuals with birth defects in the two countries [SIR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.6-1.9], and the increased risk remained into early adulthood. Individuals with malformations in the nervous system were at increased risk of developing cancer in the brain/nervous system (Norway: SIR, 58; 95% CI, 41-80; Sweden: SIR, 8.3; 95% CI, 4.0-15), individuals with Down syndrome were at an increased risk of leukemia (Norway: SIR, 36; 95% CI, 26-48; Sweden: SIR, 36; 95% CI, 28-46), and there was an increased overall cancer risk for individuals with multiple birth defects (Norway: SIR, 5.5; 95% CI, 3.3-8.7; Sweden: SIR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.2-5.4). There was no increased overall cancer risk among mothers (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 1.0-1.0), fathers (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.9-1.0), and siblings (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.9-1.1) of children with birth defects. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an increased overall cancer risk in individuals with birth defects. The highest risks were seen for individuals with malformations in the nervous system, Down syndrome, and multiple defects. No increased overall cancer risk was seen among their parents or siblings.
PubMed ID
18296646 View in PubMed
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Cigarette, alcohol, and coffee consumption and congenital defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224733
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Jan;82(1):91-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
A D McDonald
B G Armstrong
M. Sloan
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Jan;82(1):91-3
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Causality
Coffee - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Musculoskeletal Diseases - congenital - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Quebec - epidemiology
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
We analyzed data from a survey of occupational and other factors and pregnancy outcome to assess the effects of cigarette, alcohol, and coffee consumption. There was no evidence of an association between any congenital defect and smoking. Results for alcohol and coffee consumption were largely negative, but there was a weak association with musculoskeletal defects in babies born to women who drank one or more alcoholic drinks a day.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Mar;92(3):457-60632992
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Aug;44(8):527-333651351
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Br Commonw. 1972 Dec;79(12):1057-734646562
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1983 Dec;73(12):1397-96638236
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 1981 Oct;5(4):305-97302603
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1987 Aug;44(8):521-63651350
Cites: Teratology. 1986 Aug;34(1):65-713764779
Cites: Nature. 1971 Jun 25;231(5304):529-304933000
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1971 Sep;111(1):53-95107001
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1988 Sep;45(9):581-83179232
PubMed ID
1536342 View in PubMed
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Congenital anomalies ascertained by two record systems run in parallel in the Canadian Province of Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197656
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 May-Jun;91(3):193-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
S W Wen
J. Rouleau
R B Lowry
B. Kinakin
S. Anderson-Redick
B. Sibbald
T. Turner
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, LCDC-HPB-Health Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2000 May-Jun;91(3):193-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Records
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Abstract
To assess the quality and appropriateness of Canadian Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System (CCASS), a system based on routine hospital admission/separation records, we compared the congenital anomalies ascertained by CCASS for the period of January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1993 in the province of Alberta with corresponding figures obtained from Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System (ACASS), a specific-purpose surveillance program collecting information on congenital anomalies from multiple sources with mechanisms to evaluate diagnosis. Rates of congenital anomalies estimated by CCASS tended to be higher. Agreement between CCASS and ACASS depended on diagnosis: for the International Clearinghouse for Birth Defects Monitoring System standard categories of congenital anomalies (except for anomalies of abdominal wall), agreement usually exceeded 50%; for less clear-cut diagnoses, it was well below 50%. We conclude that routine medical records can be used for surveillance purposes for major congenital anomalies with clear-cut diagnosis.
PubMed ID
10927847 View in PubMed
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Congenital defects in a cohort followed for seven years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248318
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 Sep;67(5):601-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1978
Author
A. Klemetti
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1978 Sep;67(5):601-5
Date
Sep-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
A geographically limited cohort of Finnish children was followed from birth for seven years, and all congenital abnormalities were recorded and classified and special attention was given to the cumulative detection rate, and the time of detection of various defects. Of 3674 pregnancies 135 babies with or without defects were stillborn or died during the neonatal period. The remaining 3539 were followed up to seven years, when the percentage follow-up was 81.7%. Detailed information on 76 malformed livebirths registered in the neonatal period was available in 63 cases (82.9%). The diagnosis was found to be incorrect in 6 cases and additional defects were registered in 7 of these children. Additional congenital abnormalities detected in the follow-up study were divided into three groups: all congenital disorders or abnormalities with prenatal etiology (248 children), all congenital defects (111 of these 248) and structural malformations (31 of these 111). The cumulative detection rates in these groups increased with time and at the end of the study when the children were aged seven were 9.4%, 5.6% and 2.6%, respectively.
PubMed ID
696305 View in PubMed
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Minor physical anomalies in schizophrenic patients and their siblings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203714
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;155(12):1695-702
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
B. Ismail
E. Cantor-Graae
T F McNeil
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Am J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;155(12):1695-702
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Craniofacial Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Family
Female
Foot Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology - genetics
Hand Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and type of minor physical anomalies in schizophrenic patients and their normal siblings.
Sixty adult patients with schizophrenia, 21 siblings of these patients, and 75 normal comparison subjects were assessed through use of an extended scale consisting of the Waldrop scale and 23 other minor physical anomalies.
Patients had significantly more minor physical anomalies than comparison subjects in all body areas tested and also more minor physical anomalies in total than their siblings. Hand, eye, and mouth minor physical anomalies best discriminated patients from comparison subjects. Siblings had significantly more minor physical anomalies than normal comparison subjects. Sixty percent of the patients and 38% of the siblings, but only 5% of the comparison subjects, had a higher rate of minor physical anomalies (i.e., six or more). With the exception of ear minor physical anomalies, no association was found between minor physical anomalies in the patient and sibling in the same family.
Higher levels of minor physical anomalies (especially in the eye, mouth, and hand/foot regions) characterize both schizophrenic patients and their normal siblings, but there is little similarity in these anomalies between patients and siblings in the same family. Thus, one or more genetic or shared environmental factors may increase the risk for development of both minor physical anomalies and schizophrenia in these families at large. Minor physical anomalies associated with schizophrenia are frequently found in, but are clearly not limited to, the head or facial region. The Waldrop scale identifies minor physical anomalies strongly associated with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, assessment of the new items clearly indicates that many additional minor physical anomalies are found in schizophrenic patients.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Psychiatry. 2000 Mar;157(3):48610698853
PubMed ID
9842778 View in PubMed
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Prevalence and geographic disparities in certain congenital anomalies in Quebec: comparison of estimation methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201111
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1999;20(2):51-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
R. Choinière
M. Pageau
M. Ferland
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux (RRSSS) de Montréal-Centre, Direction de la santé publique, Montreal, Quebec, H2X 3L9, Canada. Robert_Choiniere@ssss.gouv.qc.ca.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1999;20(2):51-7
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Quebec from MED-ECHO hospitalization records and from records of stillbirths. The results are first compared with those from the Canadian Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System (CCASS) for Quebec and Canada; then the data are examined by period and region of residence. The study results show that, for the congenital anomalies selected for the study, the prevalence rates measured for Quebec from the MED-ECHO data tend to be lower than the prevalence rates for Canada, whereas the rates estimated by CCASS are higher for Quebec than for Canada. The MED-ECHO data cover practically all Quebec births, compared with only 15% coverage by CCASS, and therefore provide a more accurate picture of congenital anomalies in Quebec.
PubMed ID
10455037 View in PubMed
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Relationship between interpregnancy interval and congenital anomalies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105032
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):564.e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Innie Chen
Gian S Jhangri
Sujata Chandra
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, and School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):564.e1-8
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta - epidemiology
Birth Intervals - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Folic Acid Deficiency - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To assess the association between interpregnancy intervals and congenital anomalies.
A retrospective cohort study on women who had 2 consecutive singleton births from 1999-2007 was conducted using a linked dataset from the Alberta Perinatal Health Program, the Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System, and the Alberta Health and Wellness Database. Interpregnancy interval was calculated as the interval between 2 consecutive deliveries minus the gestational age of the second infant. The primary outcome of congenital anomaly was defined using the International Classification of Diseases. Maternal demographic and obstetric characteristics and interpregnancy intervals were included in multivariable logistic regression models for congenital anomalies.
The study included 46,243 women, and the overall rate of congenital anomalies was 2.2%. Both short and long interpregnancy intervals were associated with congenital anomalies. The lowest rate was for the 12-17 months category (1.9%, reference category), and increased rates were seen for both short intervals (2.5% for 0-5 months; adjusted odds ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.72) and long intervals (2.3% for 24-35 months; adjusted odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.52). Statistically significant associations were also observed for folate independent anomalies, but not for folate dependent anomalies.
The risk of congenital anomalies appears to increase with both short and long interpregnancy intervals. This study supports the limited existing studies in the literature, further explores the types of anomalies affected, and has implications for further research and prenatal risk assessment.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jun;210(6):498-924603097
PubMed ID
24508646 View in PubMed
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Upper limb deficiencies and associated malformations: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222630
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Dec 1;44(6):767-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1992
Author
U G Froster
P A Baird
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Medizinische Universität zu Lübeck, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Am J Med Genet. 1992 Dec 1;44(6):767-81
Date
Dec-1-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Arm - abnormalities
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Congenital Abnormalities - classification - epidemiology
Female
Hand Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
As part of an ongoing analysis of limb deficiencies occurring among 1,213,913 consecutive livebirths in British Columbia during the years 1952-1984, all cases with deficiencies of the upper limbs were analysed with a view to identifying associated patterns of anomalies. This analysis resulted in seven subgroups. For each subgroup, incidence figures for cases with and without additional anomalies were calculated separately. The proportion of cases with additional anomalies varied markedly by subgroup. For example, 89% of cases with longitudinal defects of the radius had additional malformations, while only 28% of cases with transverse defects of the radius had other organ anomalies (chi 2 = 40.55; P
PubMed ID
1481845 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.