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Acculturation and depressive symptoms in Muslim university students: personal-family acculturation match.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158048
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Yasmin Asvat
Vanessa L Malcarne
Author Affiliation
San Diego State University, CA 92120-4913, USA.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Apr;43(2):114-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Cultural Characteristics
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Islam - psychology
Male
Mass Screening
Parenting
Religion and Psychology
Social Identification
Social Values
Students - psychology
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationships of personal acculturation and of personal-family acculturation match to depressive symptoms were investigated in a sample of 68 Muslim university students. Two dimensions of personal and family acculturation were assessed: heritage and mainstream culture identification. Participants completed the Vancouver Index of Acculturation (Ryder, Alden, & Paulhus, 2000 ) and the depressive disorder subscale of the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire (Zimmerman & Mattia, 1999 ). For personal acculturation, individuals with high personal heritage culture identification reported fewer lifetime (but not past-year) depressive symptoms. In contrast, individuals with high personal mainstream culture identification reported more past-year (but not lifetime) depressive symptoms. The hypothesis that a match between personal and family acculturation orientation would be associated with fewer depressive symptoms was supported for heritage culture identification only. For past-year depression, the two match conditions (low or high personal and family heritage culture identification) were associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than a low personal/high family mismatch but did not differ from a high personal/low family mismatch. For lifetime depression, a high personal/high family match was associated with significantly fewer depressive symptoms than all other conditions. Findings suggests that, for Muslims, a match of high personal and high family heritage culture identification may act as a protective factor for the experience of depressive symptoms both in the short term (past year) and in the long term (lifetime).
PubMed ID
22023606 View in PubMed
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Adding a baby to the equation. married and cohabiting women's relationship satisfaction in the transition to parenthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126051
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Øystein Mortensen
Torbjørn Torsheim
Ole Melkevik
Frode Thuen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. oystein.mortensen@uib.no
Source
Fam Process. 2012 Mar;51(1):122-39
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Confidence Intervals
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Models, Psychological
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Report
Spouses - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Time Factors
Women's health
Abstract
The trajectory of relationship satisfaction among married and cohabiting women in their transition to parenthood was compared in a potential sample of 71,504 women taking part in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Prospective longitudinal data were collected in 4 waves over a 2-year period starting 6 months prebirth. Results from latent curve models suggested that married and cohabiting women experience similar negative change in relationship satisfaction during the transition to parenthood. However, cohabiting women start off and stay less satisfied throughout the transition period, suggesting the presence of a negative cohabitation effect that prevailed after controlling for various covariates. Extending investigation on the cohabitation effect to the transition to parenthood, and replicating it in a Scandinavian context, is discussed in relation to the understanding of what causes the cohabitation effect, and its clinical implications.
PubMed ID
22428715 View in PubMed
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Adolescent suicide attempts in Bærum, Norway, 1984-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138824
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Gudrun Dieserud
Ragnhild M Gerhardsen
Hanne Van den Weghe
Karina Corbett
Author Affiliation
Department of Suicide Research and Prevention, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. gudi@fhi.no
Source
Crisis. 2010;31(5):255-64
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology
Attitude to Health
Conflict (Psychology)
Family - psychology
Female
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Motivation
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - trends
Population Surveillance
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Suburban Population - trends
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - trends
Abstract
There are presently few international studies that examine adolescents' own experience of both triggering and the underlying reasons behind their suicide attempts.
To present the rates, triggering factors, and underlying reasons for such behavior.
The 23-year (1984-2006) surveillance study reported includes all general hospital-treated suicide attempters aged between 13 and 19 years (n = 254) living in the municipality of Bærum, a suburb on the outskirts of Oslo, Norway.
Suicide attempt rates for both sexes decreased during the period of study. The female suicide attempt rate was on average 3.5 times higher than the male rate. An average of 8.2% of the suicide attempters made a repeat attempt within the following year. Overall, the most commonly reported trigger was a relational conflict (50.2%), and the most commonly reported underlying reason was a dysfunctional family situation (43.6%), followed by mental health problems (22.8%). The main gender difference for both triggers and underlying reasons was that relational conflicts were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys as triggers (55.0% versus 32.7%), and dysfunctional family issues were reported significantly more often by girls than by boys (47.1% versus 30.8%) as underlying reasons for the attempt. Mental health problems were reported less frequently as an underlying reason by girls than boys (21.2% versus 28.8%).
A family-oriented intervention embracing the extended family system seems warranted in a majority of the cases in our study.
PubMed ID
21134845 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease feel ambivalent towards their parents' concern for them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87529
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Reichenberg Kjell
Lindfred Helene
Saalman Robert
Author Affiliation
The Nordic School of Public Health and The Vårdal Institute, Lund and Göteborg Universities, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell@reichenberg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
This is a grounded theory study to identify concepts for describing how adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) respond to their parents' concern for them. Ten adolescent boys and seven girls were interviewed. In the analysis four main categories emerged: ambivalence, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. We found ambivalence to be the most distinctive theme to appear in the way in which these young people described how they felt about their parents' response to their disease. The core category ambivalence was expressed as an oscillation between seeking close contact with one's parents or, sometimes, staving them off, one moment feeling anxiously dependent upon them or turning to them for protection and support and the next, trying to achieve a dialogue with them. The core category comprised three subcategories, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. The clinical support for young individuals with IBD should include an awareness of the simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, reactions and emotions.
PubMed ID
18036010 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences among women prisoners: relationships to suicide attempts and drug abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256618
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Christine Friestad
Rustad Åse-Bente
Ellen Kjelsberg
Author Affiliation
1Oslo University Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;60(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - diagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Life Change Events
Likelihood Functions
Norway
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Spouse Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women prisoners are known to suffer from an accumulation of factors known to increase the risk for several major health problems. This study examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and the relationship between such experiences and suicide attempts and drug use among incarcerated women in Norway.
A total of 141 women inmates (75% of all eligible) were interviewed using a structured interview guide covering information on demographics and a range of ACE related to abuse and neglect, and household dysfunction. The main outcome variables were attempted suicide and adult drug abuse.
Emotional, physical and sexual abuse during childhood was experienced by 39%, 36% and 19%, respectively, and emotional and physical neglect by 31% and 33%, respectively. Looking at the full range of ACE, 17% reported having experienced none, while 34% reported having experienced more than five ACEs. After controlling for age, immigrant background and marital status, the number of ACEs significantly increased the risk of attempted suicide and current drug abuse.
The associations observed between early life trauma and later health risk behaviour indicate the need for early prevention. The findings also emphasize the important role of prison health services in secondary prevention among women inmates.
PubMed ID
23045353 View in PubMed
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Adverse childhood experiences in relation to mood and anxiety disorders in a population-based sample of active military personnel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124248
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
J. Sareen
C A Henriksen
S L Bolton
T O Afifi
M B Stein
G J G Asmundson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. sareen@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Psychol Med. 2013 Jan;43(1):73-84
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Domestic Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family Conflict - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel - psychology
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although it has been posited that exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increases vulnerability to deployment stress, previous literature in this area has demonstrated conflicting results. Using a cross-sectional population-based sample of active military personnel, the present study examined the relationship between ACEs, deployment related stressors and mood and anxiety disorders.
Data were analyzed from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey-Canadian Forces Supplement (CCHS-CFS; n = 8340, age 18-54 years, response rate 81%). The following ACEs were self-reported retrospectively: childhood physical abuse, childhood sexual abuse, economic deprivation, exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce/separation, parental substance abuse problems, hospitalization as a child, and apprehension by a child protection service. DSM-IV mood and anxiety disorders [major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic attacks/disorder and social phobia] were assessed using the composite international diagnostic interview (CIDI).
Even after adjusting for the effects of deployment-related traumatic exposures (DRTEs), exposure to ACEs was significantly associated with past-year mood or anxiety disorder among men [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.34, 99% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.73, p
PubMed ID
22608015 View in PubMed
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Adverse trajectories of mental health problems predict subsequent burnout and work-family conflict - a longitudinal study of employed women with children followed over 18 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282979
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-08-2016
Author
Wendy Nilsen
Anni Skipstein
Evangelia Demerouti
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 Nov 08;16(1):384
Date
Nov-08-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Conflict (Psychology)
Employment - psychology
Family Characteristics
Family Conflict
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Norway
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
The long-term consequence of experiencing mental health problems may lead to several adverse outcomes. The current study aims to validate previous identified trajectories of mental health problems from 1993 to 2006 in women by examining their implications on subsequent work and family-related outcomes in 2011.
Employed women (n?=?439) with children were drawn from the Tracking Opportunities and Problems-Study (TOPP), a community-based longitudinal study following Norwegian families across 18 years. Previous identified latent profiles of mental health trajectories (i.e., High; Moderate; Low-rising and Low levels of mental health problems over time) measured at six time points between 1993 and 2006 were examined as predictors of burnout (e.g., exhaustion and disengagement from work) and work-family conflict in 2011 in univariate and multivariate analyses of variance adjusted for potential confounders (age, job demands, and negative emotionality).
We found that having consistently High and Moderate symptoms as well as Low-Rising symptoms from 1993 to 2006 predicted higher levels of exhaustion, disengagement from work and work-family conflict in 2011. Findings remained unchanged when adjusting for several potential confounders, but when adjusting for current mental health problems only levels of exhaustion were predicted by the mental health trajectories.
The study expands upon previous studies on the field by using a longer time span and by focusing on employed women with children who experience different patterns of mental health trajectories. The long-term effect of these trajectories highlight and validate the importance of early identification and prevention in women experiencing adverse patterns of mental health problems with regards to subsequent work and family-related outcomes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27825325 View in PubMed
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Advocacy for patients: are outsiders necessary? A psychiatric hospital perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234333
Source
Health Law Can. 1988;8(4):108-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Affected in the nightclub. A case study of regular clubbers' conflictual practices in nightclubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113967
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jakob Demant
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Denmark. jd@crf.au.dk
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Music
Philosophy
Psychological Theory
Restaurants
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The nightclub as a space is presented as a free and hedonistic place for pleasure. This space is also part of a wider socio-spatial-economic framework in which various forms of regulation apply to clubbers and the cultivation of affects. This paper researches marginal and contested forms of experiences within a club as a way of understanding the complexities of pleasure. The study does so by addressing experiences through the concept of affects, which is situated within a framework of a non-representational theory of space. Anxiety, pride, anger, shame and embarrassment are embodied simultaneously with the affects of love, joy, sympathy and so on. Alcohol, illicit drugs, bouncers, music and other human or non-human actants are part of the place. It is within this heterogeneous assemblage that affects become embodied. The data consists of 273 cases from a large Copenhagen nightclub where guests have complained about being rejected or being given quarantine. The paper suggests that if the space of the club is approached as being more than a mono-affectual space of either risk or pleasure, then it would be possible to reduce conflicts and produce more inclusive spaces.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):167-7223352332
PubMed ID
23664721 View in PubMed
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444 records – page 1 of 45.