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754 records – page 1 of 76.

[About a comprehensive pseudonymous registry]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23731
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):487-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1994
Author
O H Iversen
P F Hjort
Author Affiliation
Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Feb 10;114(4):487-8
Date
Feb-10-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidentiality
Humans
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries - standards
PubMed ID
8009492 View in PubMed
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Access to confidential sexual health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167386
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Sep;102(7):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Evelyn P Kennedy
Cyndee MacPhee
Author Affiliation
St. Francis Xavier University/Cape Breton University Nursing Program, Sydney, Nova Scotia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2006 Sep;102(7):29-31
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Confidentiality
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nova Scotia
Sexuality
Abstract
The authors conducted one-on-one interviews with adolescent females, aged 13 to 16, concerning their perception of the confidentiality of sexual health services available to them. Participants were selected from an urban school with a youth health centre (YHC) and also from a rural school without access to a YHC. They typically viewed traditional health services as not confidential and reported concern about disclosure to parents. This qualitative study suggests that adolescent females have an absolute need to maintain positive parental regard by preventing disclosure of sexual activity.
PubMed ID
16989098 View in PubMed
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Access to health care information: legal imperative or moral responsibility?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104003
Source
Health Law Can. 1990;10(3):213-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

Access to information for adult adoptees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226501
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1991
Author
K. Kimbell
Source
CMAJ. 1991 Apr 15;144(8):958-60
Date
Apr-15-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Adult
Birth Certificates
Canada
Confidentiality
Humans
Records as Topic
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1991 Oct 15;145(8):9231913424
PubMed ID
2009473 View in PubMed
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Access to medical records for research purposes: varying perceptions across research ethics boards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158011
Source
J Med Ethics. 2008 Apr;34(4):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
D J Willison
C. Emerson
K V Szala-Meneok
E. Gibson
L. Schwartz
K M Weisbaum
F. Fournier
K. Brazil
M D Coughlin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, St Joseph's Healthcare, McMaster University, 105 Main Street East, P1, Hamilton, ON L8N 1G8, Canada. willison@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Med Ethics. 2008 Apr;34(4):308-14
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - ethics - standards
Canada
Confidentiality - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology - standards
Ethics Committees, Research - ethics - standards
Humans
Medical Records - legislation & jurisprudence
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Research Subjects - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
Variation across research ethics boards (REBs) in conditions placed on access to medical records for research purposes raises concerns around negative impacts on research quality and on human subject protection, including privacy.
To study variation in REB consent requirements for retrospective chart review and who may have access to the medical record for data abstraction.
Thirty 90-min face-to-face interviews were conducted with REB chairs and administrators affiliated with faculties of medicine in Canadian universities, using structured questions around a case study with open-ended responses. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded manually.
Fourteen sites (47%) required individual patient consent for the study to proceed as proposed. Three (10%) indicated that their response would depend on how potentially identifying variables would be managed. Eleven sites (38%) did not require consent. Two (7%) suggested a notification and opt-out process. Most stated that consent would be required if identifiable information was being abstracted from the record. Among those not requiring consent, there was substantial variation in recognising that the abstracted information could potentially indirectly re-identify individuals. Concern over access to medical records by an outside individual was also associated with requirement for consent. Eighteen sites (60%) required full committee review. Sixteen (53%) allowed an external research assistant to abstract information from the health record.
Large variation was found across sites in the requirement for consent for research involving access to medical records. REBs need training in best practices for protecting privacy and confidentiality in health research. A forum for REB chairs to confidentially share concerns and decisions about specific studies could also reduce variation in decisions.
PubMed ID
18375687 View in PubMed
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Adolescent minors, informed consent and health information privacy: balancing paternalism, health and autonomy in the reproductive health care context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160481
Source
Health Law Can. 2007 Aug;28(1):16-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007

Adolescents' information management: comparing ideas about why adolescents disclose to or keep secrets from their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259163
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2014 May;43(5):803-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Lauree Tilton-Weaver
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2014 May;43(5):803-13
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Authoritarianism
Child
Cohort Studies
Communication
Confidentiality
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Self Disclosure
Social Support
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Recognizing that adolescents providing or withholding information about their activities is a strong predictor of parental knowledge, this article compares several ideas about what prompts adolescents to disclose information or keep secrets from their parents. Using a sample of 874 Northern European adolescents (aged 12-16 years; 49.8 % were girls), modified cross-lagged models examined parental monitoring (solicitation and monitoring rules), adolescent delinquency, and perceived parental support as predictors and consequences of adolescents disclosing to parents or keeping secrets, with adolescents' acceptance of parental authority as a moderator. Results suggest that, when adolescents view their parents as supportive, they subsequently disclose more and keep fewer secrets. Engaging in delinquent behavior was related reciprocally to keeping secrets. By comparison, the results generally did not support the idea that adolescents who are monitored provide information to parents, even when they accept parental authority. These results suggest that relationship dynamics and adolescents' delinquent behaviors play an important role in adolescents' information management.
PubMed ID
24002679 View in PubMed
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754 records – page 1 of 76.