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2310 records – page 1 of 231.

1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up of occlusal status and radiographic findings in mandibular condyles of the elderly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187416
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kaija Hiltunen
Miira M Vehkalahti
Jaakko S Peltola
Anja Ainamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, Finland. kaija.hiltunen@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Prosthodont. 2002 Nov-Dec;15(6):539-43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Dentition
Denture, Partial, Fixed
Dentures
Dislocations - classification - radiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - classification - rehabilitation
Logistic Models
Male
Mandibular Condyle - radiography
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis - classification - radiography
Osteosclerosis - classification - radiography
Radiography, Panoramic
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - classification - radiography
Abstract
The aim of the present 5-year follow-up was to clarify the nature of occlusal support status and radiographic changes in condyles of the elderly, and the association between these two variables.
The present study is part of a comprehensive medical survey of a random sample born in 1904, 1909, and 1914. A total of 364 subjects living in Helsinki participated in the dental part of the examination during 1990 to 1991, and after 5 years a total of 103 were reexamined. Comprehensive data on occlusal support status were available for 94 subjects, and radiographic data were available for 88 subjects. Occlusal support status was assessed on the basis of the Eichner index, radiographic changes were assessed from panoramic radiographs, and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were assessed using Helkimo's anamnestic index.
The most frequent radiographic finding in the mandibular joint was flattening of the articular surface of the condyle associated with osteoarthrosis, found at baseline in 17% and during follow-up in 13% of the subjects. During the 5-year follow-up, Eichner index for natural dentition remained unaltered in 94% of the subjects and in 85% of the subjects when removable dentures were included. There were no radiographic changes in 92% of the cases. No differences based on age or gender were found. A logistic regression model revealed associations between the selected baseline factors. The odds ratio for baseline Helkimo's anamnestic index was 4.1, 5.7 for Eichner index with the support of removable dentures, and 356 for radiographic findings.
Radiographic changes in condyles of elderly people were small during the 5-year follow-up, but baseline radiographic findings, Helkimo's anamnestic index, and Eichner index with removable dentures were risk factors for radiographic findings at the end of the follow-up.
PubMed ID
12475158 View in PubMed
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5-y Follow-up study of patients with neuroborreliosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31443
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Johan Berglund
Louise Stjernberg
Katharina Ornstein
Katarina Tykesson-Joelsson
Hallstein Walter
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. johan.berglund@ltblekinge.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2002;34(6):421-5
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Lyme Neuroborreliosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The objective of this follow-up study was to determine the long-term outcome of strictly classified cases of neuroborreliosis treated with antibiotics. A 1-y prospective population-based survey of Lyme borreliosis was conducted in southern Sweden between 1992 and 1993. A total of 349 identified cases with suspected neuroborreliosis were followed up 5 y later. Medical records were reviewed and all participants filled in a questionnaire. Of those patients classified with definite neuroborreliosis, 114/130 completed the follow-up, of whom 111 had completed the initial antibiotic treatment. Of the 114 patients followed up, 86 (75%) had recovered completely and 70 (61%) had recovered within 6 months. Residual neurological symptoms, such as facial palsy, concentration disorder, paresthesia and/or neuropathy, were reported by 28/114 patients. No significant differences between different antibiotic treatments were observed in terms of the occurrence of sequelae. To conclude, we found that 25% (95% confidence interval 17-33%) of the patients suffered from residual neurological symptoms 5 y post-treatment. However, the clinical outcome of treated neuroborreliosis is favorable as only 14/114 (12%) patients had sequelae that influenced their daily activities post-treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment would seem to be of great importance in order to avoid such sequelae.
PubMed ID
12160168 View in PubMed
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10-year results of a new low-monomer cement: follow-up of a randomized RSA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119286
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Per Söderlund
Jon Dahl
Stephan Röhrl
Bo Nivbrant
Kjell G Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Institution of Surgery and Perioperative Sciences and Department of Orthopedics, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. per.soderlund@orthop.umu.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2012 Dec;83(6):604-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - methods
Bone Cements - chemistry - therapeutic use
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Time Factors
Titanium
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The properties and performance of a new low-monomer cement were examined in this prospective randomized, controlled RSA study. 5-year data have already been published, showing no statistically significant differences compared to controls. In the present paper we present the 10-year results.
44 patients were originally randomized to receive total hip replacement with a Lubinus SPII titanium-aluminum-vanadium stem cemented either with the new Cemex Rx bone cement or with control bone cement, Palacos R. Patients were examined using RSA, Harris hip score, and conventional radiographs.
At 10 years, 33 hips could be evaluated clinically and 30 hips could be evaluated with RSA (16 Cemex and 14 Palacos). 9 patients had died and 4 patients were too old or infirm to be investigated. Except for 1 hip that was revised for infection after less than 5 years, no further hips were revised before the 10-year follow-up. There were no statistically significant clinical differences between the groups. The Cemex cement had magnitudes of migration similar to or sometimes lower than those of Palacos cement. In both groups, most hips showed extensive radiolucent lines, probably due to the use of titanium alloy stems.
At 10 years, the Cemex bone cement tested performed just as well as the control (Palacos bone cement).
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 2001 Dec;72(6):572-8411817871
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2004 Sep;86(7):974-815446521
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand Suppl. 1986;221:1-403468743
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 May 21;296(6634):1454-63132290
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res. 1993 May;27(5):565-748314809
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2000 Aug;15(5):570-510959994
Cites: Acta Orthop Scand. 1994 Feb;65(1):20-38154277
Cites: J Appl Biomater. 1995 Spring;6(1):75-837703541
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1996 Mar;78(3):325-308613438
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1996 Sep;78(5):802-88836075
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2008 Dec;79(6):826-3119085502
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1993 Oct;(295):239-458403655
PubMed ID
23116438 View in PubMed
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A 20-year ecological study of the temporal association between influenza and meningococcal disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30400
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Elise Snitker Jensen
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Susanne Samuelsson
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Henrik Carl Schønheyder
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Arhus, Denmark. esjensen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(2):181-7
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Meningococcal Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Periodicity
Poisson Distribution
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Both influenza and meningococcal disease (MD) show seasonal variation with peak incidence rates during the winter. We examined whether fluctuations in occurrence of influenza were associated with changes in the incidence rate of MD, either simultaneously or with a delay of one or 2 weeks, and whether age had an impact on these associations. This ecological study was based on weekly surveillance data on influenza and a complete registration of MD cases (n = 413) in North Jutland County, Denmark, during 1980-1999. A total of 379 MD cases occurred during weeks with influenza registration. The analysis was done using a Poisson regression model taking into account the seasonal variation and trend over time in incidence rate of MD, and stratified by age: or = 14 years (n = 152). An increase of 100 registered cases of influenza per 100,000 inhabitants was associated with a 7% (95% CI: -1 to 15%) increase in the number of MD cases during the same week. The association was most marked for
PubMed ID
15074574 View in PubMed
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The 32-base pair deletion of the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) is not associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis in 363 Scandinavian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168816
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
E. Melum
T H Karlsen
U. Broomé
E. Thorsby
E. Schrumpf
K M Boberg
B A Lie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Sognsvannsyn 20, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Pairing
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Deletion
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on T-cells and macrophages. A 32-base pair deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) leads to a non-functional receptor. Conflicting evidence exists whether this deletion is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We genotyped the CCR5-Delta32 variant in 363 PSC patients and 366 controls. No significant increase in the Delta32 allele frequency was detected in the PSC patients compared to controls (12.7% vs 10.7% OR = 1.22, 95% CI [0.88, 1.68], P = 0.23). Survival analysis did not reveal any significant effects from CCR5-Delta32 genotypes on disease progression. Thus, in this study (power > 90%, given OR = 2, alpha = 0.05), we were unable to replicate previous findings and our results do not support an involvement of CCR5-Delta32 in either PSC susceptibility or progression.
Notes
Erratum In: Tissue Antigens. 2006 Aug;68(2):192
PubMed ID
16774544 View in PubMed
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The 1996 and 1997 National survey of physician asthma management practices: background and study methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201629
Source
Can Respir J. 1999 May-Jun;6(3):269-72
Publication Type
Article
Author
R L Jin
B C Choi
Author Affiliation
Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, Canada. robert_jin@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 1999 May-Jun;6(3):269-72
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Asthma - therapy
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Male
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
To collect national baseline information on asthma management practices by physicians, and to compare these practices with the recommendations of the Canadian Asthma Consensus Conference ('the guidelines').
Cross-sectional survey of representative samples of physicians in Canada in late 1996 and early 1997.
Five specialty types of physicians who manage asthma patients: respirology, pediatrics, internal medicine, allergy and clinical immunology, and general practice and family medicine. Stratified sampling by province and specialty was used to select physicians for the study. Weighting was used in the analysis to generalize the results to the national level for the five specialty groups of physicians.
Mailed questionnaire, self-administered by the respondent; three mailings of the questionnaires were used to increase the response rate.
The frequency with which each of the five specialty types chose specific asthma management choices was determined, using weighted percentages representative of the specialty groups on a national basis. ANOVA determined the statistically significant differences among the five specialties in choosing particular asthma management actions. Then, logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios showing an association between the characteristics of the physician respondents and specific asthma management choices that they made in the survey.
The data analysis demonstrated significant variations among physicians in asthma management practices, according to specialty type and other characteristics. The initial report was released in April 1998, and manuscripts for journal submissions are being prepared.
PubMed ID
10393288 View in PubMed
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5993 survivors of suspected myocardial infarction. 10 year incidence of later myocardial infarction and subsequent mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54402
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Galatius
J. Launbjerg
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine B. National University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):564-9
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Care Units
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the 10-year incidence of later infarction and subsequent mortality, as well as predictors of later infarction, in patients with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission. METHODS AND RESULTS: 5993 patients admitted with suspected myocardial infarction and alive on day 15 after admission were registered in The First Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial database in 1979-81. 2586 had definite infarction, 402 probable infarction and 3005 no infarction as they fulfilled 3, 2 and 1 criteria for infarction. They were followed for 10 years with respect to later infarction and death, i.e., including death after later infarction. The 10 year infarction rate after index admission was 48.8% in definite, 47.3% in probable and 24.6% in no infarction patients (P 65 years with definite or probable infarction. CONCLUSION: The 10-year infarction rate in patients with suspected myocardial infarction in whom the diagnosis is ruled out is lower than in those with definite or probable infarction, but the mortality after a later infarction is similar in all three groups.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1998 Apr;19(4):534-59597397
PubMed ID
9597404 View in PubMed
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The ability of vegetation size on echocardiography to predict clinical complications: a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54509
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1997 Jun;10(5):562-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
M D Tischler
P T Vaitkus
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Unit, University of Vermont College of Medicine and Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, USA.
Source
J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1997 Jun;10(5):562-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidence Intervals
Echocardiography
Embolism - etiology
Endocarditis, Bacterial - complications - mortality - surgery - ultrasonography
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Humans
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To clarify whether echocardiographic detection of a vegetation 10 mm or larger in size in patients with left-sided infective endocarditis poses an increased risk for complications, we performed a meta-analysis of English-language publications identified by a computerized search of the key words infective endocarditis and echocardiography. A pooled odds ratio was calculated by using the Robins, Greenland, and Breslow estimate of variance. The pooled odds ratio for increased risk of systemic embolization in the presence of a vegetation >10 mm (10 studies, 738 patients) was 2.80 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.95 to 4.02; p 10 mm pose a significantly increased risk of (1) systemic embolization and (2) a need for valve-replacement surgery than cases where either no or smaller vegetations are detected.
PubMed ID
9203497 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation and gender-specific risk of fatal coronary artery disease in the HUNT 1 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127351
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erik Madssen
Lars Vatten
Tom Ivar Nilsen
Kristian Midthjell
Rune Wiseth
Ane Cecilie Dale
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - metabolism - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
To assess fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) by gender and glucose regulation status.
47,951 people were followed up according to fatal CAD identified in the National Cause of Death Registry. Gender-effects of fatal CAD in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), newly diagnosed diabetes (NDM) or known diabetes (KDM) compared with people with normal glucose regulation (NGR) were calculated using Cox regression.
Using NGR as reference, the hazard ratios (HR, 95% confidence intervals) associated with IGR was 1.2 (0.8-1.9) for women and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) for men. The corresponding HRs were 1.6 (1.2-2.2) and 1.4 (1.1.-1.9) for NDM, and 2.5 (2.1-2.8) and 1.8 (1.6-2.1) for KDM. The gender-difference in mortality varied by category (P(interaction) = 0.003). Using women as the reference, the HRs for men were 2.1 (2.0-2.3) for NGR, 1.8 (1.0-3.3) for IGR, 1.6 (1.0-2.5) for NDM, and 1.2 (1.0-1.5) for KDM.
Diabetes mellitus, but not IGR, was associated with fatal CAD in both genders. The known gender-difference in CAD mortality was attenuated in people with abnormal glucose regulation, evident already in people with IGR.
PubMed ID
22303857 View in PubMed
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2310 records – page 1 of 231.